Tommy Simpson

williamcope1990
williamcope1990 Posts: 22
edited January 2014 in Road general
Any reason why he isn't celebrity as much as (in my opinion) he should be?

Up until Wiggo he was the spearhead of British road cycling!

Comments

  • Before the age of internet, 24 hour news, and the insatiable need for the public to adore celebrities. Just these days it all has to happen instantly and has to be hyped up so much so that it makes millions to the investors/sponsors/etc.

    To those who knew and cared, I'm sure he was a major celebrity at the time - certainly books have been written and films have been made which is pretty huge for the time.

    I guess the nature of his death means that no one now will be that interested when the cycling world is trying to rid itself of the drugs image.
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  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    He got SPOTY didn't he? What more can a man ask for!!

    Seriously though, I am not old enough to have been aware of Tom when he was alive but I think this is probably as per Schobie's post, the age of celebrity has changed. Nowadays, the celebrity status (and associated 'fame') goes to any third rate actor who can write a moronic tweet. Back in Tom's day, you had to be the first man to land on the moon or climb Everest to achieve the status, with the associated media interest. Also, bear in mind that around the same time the major sport (by a long, long way) was footy. I suspect Joe Public could have named all 11 players of the world cup team yet be unable to name 3 pro cyclists.
  • de_sisti
    de_sisti Posts: 1,283
    Nuff said. Thread can be closed.
  • Up until Wiggo he was the spearhead of British road cycling!

    That rather overlooks Robert Millar's achievements.
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    Up until Wiggo he was the spearhead of British road cycling!

    That rather overlooks Robert Millar's achievements.

    And Chris Boardman and Barry Hoban and Colin Sturgess and David Millar and Malcolm Elliott and Jeremy Hunt and Sean Yates and....oh hang on, there's loads.....
  • chris_bass
    chris_bass Posts: 4,913
    probably due to the fact that he was known to have taken performance enhancing drugs (although this wasnt banned at the time) and that's ultimately what led to his death.
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  • tomisitt
    tomisitt Posts: 257
    PEDs were banned (and criminalised in France) two and a half years before Simpson's death.

    What I find interesting is how some dopers are still revered (Merckx, Simpson, Pantani, Fignon, Kelly), while others are detested (the Toxic Texan, Vino, Ricco, Rasmussen, etc). Why is that?

    And as for putting SPOTY on that monument...really? Might as well put his Cycle Proficiency Certificate on there as well.
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    Same can be said for Beryl Burton Vs. Laura Trott, Victoria Pendleton and Co.

    Bradley who???
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  • LegendLust
    LegendLust Posts: 1,022
    Simpson is still the best one day classics rider we've ever had.

    Nuff said
  • What I find interesting is how some dopers are still revered (Merckx, Simpson, Pantani, Fignon, Kelly), while others are detested (the Toxic Texan, Vino, Ricco, Rasmussen, etc). Why is that?

    I've often thought that. I sometimes think it may be something to do with the fact that we assume back in those days the drugs simply weren't very good, so didn't help that much. After all, Tom Simpson was meant to have been knocking back his amphetamines with a bottle of brandy so it all seems a bit more charming and innocent than Lance Armstrong's cold and clinical doping regime.
  • LegendLust
    LegendLust Posts: 1,022
    vertigo16 wrote:
    What I find interesting is how some dopers are still revered (Merckx, Simpson, Pantani, Fignon, Kelly), while others are detested (the Toxic Texan, Vino, Ricco, Rasmussen, etc). Why is that?

    I've often thought that. I sometimes think it may be something to do with the fact that we assume back in those days the drugs simply weren't very good, so didn't help that much. After all, Tom Simpson was meant to have been knocking back his amphetamines with a bottle of brandy so it all seems a bit more charming and innocent than Lance Armstrong's cold and clinical doping regime.

    And Simpson wasn't a c**t
  • imposter2.0
    imposter2.0 Posts: 12,028
    LegendLust wrote:
    vertigo16 wrote:
    What I find interesting is how some dopers are still revered (Merckx, Simpson, Pantani, Fignon, Kelly), while others are detested (the Toxic Texan, Vino, Ricco, Rasmussen, etc). Why is that?

    I've often thought that. I sometimes think it may be something to do with the fact that we assume back in those days the drugs simply weren't very good, so didn't help that much. After all, Tom Simpson was meant to have been knocking back his amphetamines with a bottle of brandy so it all seems a bit more charming and innocent than Lance Armstrong's cold and clinical doping regime.

    And Simpson wasn't a c**t

    Good point, well made... ;)
  • Pross
    Pross Posts: 40,553
    Personality, likeability, vulnerability and repentance all play a huge part in how we perceive dopers just as how we perceive other people who've committed crimes and misdemeanors.
  • jordan_217
    jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    Holding your hands up and saying (sincerely) "I fooked up, I'm guilty, sorry" goes a long way with your public image and no doubt with your peers in the pro peleton. David Millar could never be excused for what he done but at least he had the bollocks to serve his time and try to change things afterwards. A great ambassador for the sport and for anti-doping. Shame he's almost done….
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • LegendLust
    LegendLust Posts: 1,022
    jordan_217 wrote:
    Holding your hands up and saying (sincerely) "I fooked up, I'm guilty, sorry" goes a long way with your public image and no doubt with your peers in the pro peloton. David Millar could never be excused for what he done but at least he had the **** to serve his time and try to change things afterwards. A great ambassador for the sport and for anti-doping. Shame he's almost done….

    And one of the classiest riders on a bike. Bags of talent as well
  • Considering how long it is since his heyday, and the circumstances of his death, Tommy Simpson is quite well recognised; there are plenty of other great athletes (from many sports) from the not-so-distant past that are completely forgotten. If you approach Joe Public and ask him to name some cyclists, the names I would expect to hear are Wiggins, Froome and Cavendish, followed by Laura Trott, Jo Rowsell, Lizzie Armitstead, Dani King et al. A great many people can name some football legends, but most of them probably haven't heard of Eddy Merckx.

    But to say that he's the 'spearhead of British cycling up until Wiggo' is ludicrously ignorant.
  • How many people can name a famous Hockey player from the sixties? Or Polo? Or swimmer? Or Judoist?

    Cyclists remember him fondly and appreciate him, surely that is what is most important?
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    How many people can name a famous Hockey player from the sixties? Or Polo? Or swimmer? Or Judoist?

    Cyclists remember him fondly and appreciate him, surely that is what is most important?

    Anton Gesink :D
  • Garry H wrote:
    How many people can name a famous Hockey player from the sixties? Or Polo? Or swimmer? Or Judoist?

    Cyclists remember him fondly and appreciate him, surely that is what is most important?

    Anton Gesink :D

    So that's one Dutch person, any British without googling? ;-)
  • LegendLust
    LegendLust Posts: 1,022
    Considering how long it is since his heyday, and the circumstances of his death, Tommy Simpson is quite well recognised; there are plenty of other great athletes (from many sports) from the not-so-distant past that are completely forgotten. If you approach Joe Public and ask him to name some cyclists, the names I would expect to hear are Wiggins, Froome and Cavendish, followed by Laura Trott, Jo Rowsell, Lizzie Armitstead, Dani King et al. A great many people can name some football legends, but most of them probably haven't heard of Eddy Merckx.

    But to say that he's the 'spearhead of British cycling up until Wiggo' is ludicrously ignorant.

    Yes I'd say that accolade lies with Brian Robinson. Paved the way for Simpson and loads more until the WCPP was put in place
  • Garry H
    Garry H Posts: 6,639
    Garry H wrote:
    How many people can name a famous Hockey player from the sixties? Or Polo? Or swimmer? Or Judoist?

    Cyclists remember him fondly and appreciate him, surely that is what is most important?

    Anton Gesink :D

    So that's one Dutch person, any British without googling? ;-)

    Brian Jacks' coach :wink: