How often do you change your tyres?

gregwari
gregwari Posts: 230
edited December 2013 in Road beginners
Simple one really, how often do you change your tyres? I got my first bike in March and (after coming off at the weekend) I was wondering how often people changed their tyres? I guess I've been riding something like 60 miles a week, there's no obvious signs of excessive wear either but there's no tread left (bike came fitted with Schwalbe Lugano tyres which had a small tread pattern in, I run them at around 95psi).

Cheers

Comments

  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    When they need it. So if they start to puncture a lot or I can see the carcass. Tread isnt really an issue on road bikes.
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    I changed my tyres at the beginning of Nov for some that are more puncture resistant and are wider.
    The old ones still have life left in them and they'll go back on when the weather warms up a bit ...

    Some tyres are better for grip in the cold & wet - those would be what I'd want on my bike in the winter ... I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    As above - when they need it. Suddenly, you'll start to get loads of punctures.

    Some tyres have a wear indicator on them - a small indentation that when it's gone, you might want to replace the tyre (some tyres even tell you where to look for the wear indicator - otherwise this advice is no good to you!).

    I'd guess from your average weekly distance, you've done around 3500-4000km on the tyres - that's starting to get to the point where many tyres will need replacing (I have never ridden the tyre you are using, so can not comment). In general, a fast, grippy, light racing tyre will not last very long at all and a hefty, slow touring tyre can last upwards of 10000km.

    From a tyre like the Conti 4-Season, I will see around 6-7000km on them.
  • It all depends on the weather with mine. Rather than using an all year round tyre, i prefer using seasonal, ie: Fortezza Tricomp's in Spring/Summer months, and Gatorskins in Winter months.
  • Moonbiker
    Moonbiker Posts: 1,706
    Some tyres have a wear indicator on them

    I never knew that.


    TWI they call them google tells me, are they only on continental tyres it seems?
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    Moonbiker wrote:
    Some tyres have a wear indicator on them

    I never knew that.


    TWI they call them google tells me, are they only on continental tyres it seems?

    Entirely possible it is a conti only thing - and it is something they haven't yet got on all tyres (but will be on most) - from their website:

    Tyres featuring the TWI :

    GP4000S, GP4000, GP Attack/Force, GPTT, Grand Prix, Grand Prix GT, GP 4Season, Gator Hardshell, Gatorskin, Grand Prix Classic.

    As this is a phase-in feature, some customers may find that they have identical tyres without this feature. This is no cause for concern.
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    marcusjb wrote:
    As this is a phase-in feature, some customers may find that they have identical tyres without this feature. This is no cause for concern.

    I thought it was a wear out feature? :mrgreen:

    How do you know if you have ones supposed to be without it or if they have simply worn out then?
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    They have TWI marked on the side wall at the point where the indicator is.
  • dabber
    dabber Posts: 1,926
    Well, you learn something every day.... I wondered what the two little recessed circles were in my Gatorskins. I never realised they were TWIs. I thought they were just part of the manufacturing process. What a dummy :oops:
    Thanks for posting this.
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

    Wilier Cento Uno SR/Wilier Mortirolo/Specialized Roubaix Comp/Kona Hei Hei/Calibre Bossnut
  • craker
    craker Posts: 1,739
    It's worth swapping tyres, rear to front and vice-versa as the back tyre wears more quickly. Do this when they're half worn out if you can determine that accurately ;-)
  • marcusjb
    marcusjb Posts: 2,412
    craker wrote:
    It's worth swapping tyres, rear to front and vice-versa as the back tyre wears more quickly. Do this when they're half worn out if you can determine that accurately ;-)

    That's sort of good advice, but with a caveat.

    The rear will wear quicker, so you move the front tyre to the rear, once the rear is worn.

    Do NOT put the worn rear on the front as this is where you want the really good grip.

    New tyre on the front.

    Front tyres do not wear very quickly, so are fine to swap onto the back after even several thousand kms.
  • I don't think I have yet worn out a tire.

    They get a fairly hard life, on rough gravel park paths/London roads and Surreys finest so normally too much embedded glass etc and I bin the tyre. Rear takes the worse of it. Had a fairly soft compound tyre in the summer that just got shredded.
  • Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    But as above - you should know when a tyre needs to go. It's a good idea to check your tyres regularly for bits of glass and flint (etc) - letting these work their way in can make for nasty surprises. Some people fill cuts in tyres with superglue, but I've always had my reservations, as superglue isn't exactly flexible...

    Provided that the roads and/or tracks you use aren't too dire, you should be able to get good mileage from a hardy tyre. My current set of Gatorskins went on last May, and in 18 months I have not even had a p*ncture. They're looking pretty worn, but there's life in them yet.
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    I don't think I have yet worn out a tire.

    They get a fairly hard life, on rough gravel park paths/London roads and Surreys finest so normally too much embedded glass etc and I bin the tyre. Rear takes the worse of it. Had a fairly soft compound tyre in the summer that just got shredded.

    Some folk and their money......

    Everyone who rides in urban areas in all weathers will get glass in their tyres. The solution is just to occasionally spend a few minutes digging it out - I reckon that most glass punctures are caused by glass you picked up on previous trips rather than the one you are on now so removing it reduces your likelihood of getting a puncture even on a relatively new tyre. It doesn't take long and I find it therapeutic. But if you like punctures and throwing money away carry on.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • Rolf F wrote:
    I don't think I have yet worn out a tire.

    They get a fairly hard life, on rough gravel park paths/London roads and Surreys finest so normally too much embedded glass etc and I bin the tyre. Rear takes the worse of it. Had a fairly soft compound tyre in the summer that just got shredded.

    Some folk and their money......

    Everyone who rides in urban areas in all weathers will get glass in their tyres. The solution is just to occasionally spend a few minutes digging it out - I reckon that most glass punctures are caused by glass you picked up on previous trips rather than the one you are on now so removing it reduces your likelihood of getting a puncture even on a relatively new tyre. It doesn't take long and I find it therapeutic. But if you like punctures and throwing money away carry on.

    Oh I pick the glass out, but even so the tyres end up slashed to pieces less from glass more from the shards of gravel. £20 tyres what every 8 months is hardly expensive.
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    They're big, heavy and slow to respond ... but as I'm commuting on them and I had them "in stock" I'll wear them down before binning them ...
  • Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    They're big, heavy and slow to respond ... but as I'm commuting on them and I had them "in stock" I'll wear them down before binning them ...

    The ones you have might be. ;)
  • slowbike
    slowbike Posts: 8,498
    Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    They're big, heavy and slow to respond ... but as I'm commuting on them and I had them "in stock" I'll wear them down before binning them ...

    The ones you have might be. ;)

    They are ... and that's why I wouldn't recommend them .... I'm sure there are some better ones available ...
  • TakeTurns
    TakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    They're big, heavy and slow to respond ... but as I'm commuting on them and I had them "in stock" I'll wear them down before binning them ...

    The ones you have might be. ;)

    They are ... and that's why I wouldn't recommend them .... I'm sure there are some better ones available ...

    I believe he's trying to insinuate something in relation to the first part of your name.
  • I put about 1400 miles on a pair of Gatorskins over the summer and I'd say they are about 50% worn on the wear indicators however they have squared off quite badly and I don't trust them cornering anymore.

    Got some Duranos on order to use for the rest of the winter.
  • TakeTurns wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    Slowbike wrote:
    I wouldn't recommend the ones I put on as they're 32mm ...

    And why's that then? ;)

    They're big, heavy and slow to respond ... but as I'm commuting on them and I had them "in stock" I'll wear them down before binning them ...

    The ones you have might be. ;)

    They are ... and that's why I wouldn't recommend them .... I'm sure there are some better ones available ...

    I believe he's trying to insinuate something in relation to the first part of your name.

    I actually wasn't, but reading back it does look like it! Just making the point that 32mm tyres aren't all slow. I'd hate for anyone to miss out. ;)
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    Oh I pick the glass out, but even so the tyres end up slashed to pieces less from glass more from the shards of gravel. £20 tyres what every 8 months is hardly expensive.

    Ahh, I can see that sharp gravel would be more of an issue. Always worth remembering when people have very different experiences of the same tyre that the geology has an effect - chalky areas tend to have flint and clay areas tend to be slippy when wet. Which is probably the explanation of why I find my Rubino Pro slicks sufficiently lethal at this time of year that I have changed front wheel - yet some swear by them!
    Faster than a tent.......