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Job interview

fatsmokerfatsmoker Posts: 638
edited December 2013 in Commuting chat
Your thoughts please . . . . I have a job interview on Tuesday down the road from where I currently work. If I cycle there (it's a bit far to walk) I'll have a cycling jacket, gloves and helmet on. I'll take them off obviously and put my suit jacket on. Of course this would create a good impression in the cycling fraternity, but with others I don't know. So, good idea or not?

Posts

  • Agent57Agent57 Posts: 2,300
    I don't understand the concern. What's wrong with travelling to work or an interview by bike? I went to a number of interviews a few months ago, all by bike. Didn't have a helmet, but did have a pannier with me. =)
    MTB commuter / 531c commuter / CR1 Team 2009 / RockHopper Pro Disc / 10 mile PB: 25:52 (Jun 2014)
  • notsobluenotsoblue Posts: 5,838
    The only thing stopping me from using my bike when I was interviewing a few months ago was the fear of damaging my suit trousers or being uncomfortable with a suit jacket on. Would be different if I had a proper town bike with a chain guard though probably.
  • Agent57Agent57 Posts: 2,300
    I just tucked my trouser leg into my socks. Did the job. :D To be honest, I only went to one of the interviews in full suitage - rolled the jacket up in a pannier on the way there, wore it on the way home.
    MTB commuter / 531c commuter / CR1 Team 2009 / RockHopper Pro Disc / 10 mile PB: 25:52 (Jun 2014)
  • thistle_thistle_ Posts: 4,589
    Just take a bag to put them in before you go in. Someone might ask what's in the bag and it'll be an icebreaker.

    If people in the new place are hostile to you cycling in, maybe it's best finding out before you accept the job?
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,980
    Why should your prospective employers care what mode of transport you use to arrive for the interview?

    As long as you get changed into your interview get up in plenty of time before you go in (you don't arrive in a lycra-clad sweaty mess and rush into the interview), I don't see what the problem is.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,480
    Wear your suit jacket on the bike, weather permitting. I go out occasionally to appointments fully suited up plus bike helmet (which is your personal choice btw, just to avoid that debate). Tuck trousers into socks or wear flourescent bike clips (your personal choice...) And oversocks if you have some, to protect your nice shoes.
  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 52,550 Lives Here
    As long as you arrive looking smart.

    Is the concern you may not??
  • Why not use it as a selling point? Health benefits - less time off due to sickness. And punctuality - not late due to trains, planes and auto-mobiles breaking down.
    --
    Saw a sign on a restaurant that said Breakfast, any time -- so I ordered French Toast in the Renaissance.
  • Agent57Agent57 Posts: 2,300
    CanalRider wrote:
    And punctuality - not late due to trains, planes and auto-mobiles breaking down.

    Dunno, a visit from the PF can really put the mockers on that. Especially if it's dark, cold and wet. One time, I had two visits on the same ride in - one in the front, one in the rear. =/
    MTB commuter / 531c commuter / CR1 Team 2009 / RockHopper Pro Disc / 10 mile PB: 25:52 (Jun 2014)
  • I think it is fine as long as you are going in to the interview looking good- no wrinkles, no sweat, etc. I would remove the cycling gear. Who knows what impression it puts off. It should be a good impression because it means you're healthy, fit, eco-conscious, etc, but you never know what puts someone off. Just my opinion.
    fatsmoker wrote:
    Your thoughts please . . . . I have a job interview on Tuesday down the road from where I currently work. If I cycle there (it's a bit far to walk) I'll have a cycling jacket, gloves and helmet on. I'll take them off obviously and put my suit jacket on. Of course this would create a good impression in the cycling fraternity, but with others I don't know. So, good idea or not?
  • If cycling to the interview makes sense for you then go ahead!
    I ride with God on my mind and power in my thighs....WOE betide you!
    I know I'm not the fastest rider on earth BUT I KNOW I AM NOT the slowest!!!
    If you Jump Red Lights in order to stay ahead you are a DISGRACE!!
  • Unless the job is at a bike shop, then cycling there isn't really going to impress anyone, and could have negative consequences, if your interviewer is cyclist hater, for example.
  • mpattsmpatts Posts: 1,002
    Personally, I'd always drive, as there is too much chance something could go wrong (flat tyre/grubby fingernails/rain shower/whatever). The likelyhood of it being a positive talking point is slim. If I was interviewing someone who came by bike, it would certainly be a talking point, but I would definitely not employ them if they preferred Shimano to Campag.
    Insert bike here:
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    ^ This. Cycling to your interview is as valid a means of getting there as any other, so if it enables you to arrive in good time, looking smart, and without huge amounts of luggage (a small backpack would typically be fine), go for it.

    A good interviewer will be assessing your ability to do the job, and nothing else. Unless the job is somehow bike-related the interviewer shouldn't care that you're a cyclist, regardless of whether they're a rabid bike-hater or ride 300 miles a week themselves.

    If I'm interviewing students or graduates who have little work experience, I might ask them about their hobbies as a way to assess skills that could be relevant to the job, specifically because they won't have had the chance to use those skills in the workplace. Candidates with more work experience would normally have applied those skills in a professional environment, so their hobbies become less relevant. At the end of the day, an interviewer shouldn't care whether a candidate has an interesting life outside work, unless it somehow bears on how well they'll do their job...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • Indeed a non-cyclist interviewer may take a view of cycling to work is firstly 'dangerous', then they'll be turning up late because of punctures, getting knocked off, having to change because of downpours, then start demanding cycling faculties etc..
  • kieranbkieranb Posts: 1,674
    I recently had an interview, cycled in my suit and put the helmet etc into a pannier. The first interviewer (my would be future manager) spotted the pannier and said 'ah!, a fellow cyclist'. We then chatted about commuting for a bit a nice ice breaker.
  • kieranb wrote:
    I recently had an interview, cycled in my suit and put the helmet etc into a pannier. The first interviewer (my would be future manager) spotted the pannier and said 'ah!, a fellow cyclist'. We then chatted about commuting for a bit a nice ice breaker.

    Not trying to put you on the spot or pry into your business BUT did you get the job?
    I ride with God on my mind and power in my thighs....WOE betide you!
    I know I'm not the fastest rider on earth BUT I KNOW I AM NOT the slowest!!!
    If you Jump Red Lights in order to stay ahead you are a DISGRACE!!
  • Dunno yet, but I don't think so. They didn't mention the helmet and pannier bag, so that didn't have any bearing and I spruced up well enough. But I struggle to 'speak the language of the business' as my current employer calls it on appraisals, and this new job seemed to be looking for the same kind of nonsense - how would I form relationships with external stakeholders? By not poking them in the eye.

    Nevermind either way. Current job allows me plenty of time to trawl this forum and play facebook scrabble. :)
  • fatsmoker wrote:
    Dunno yet, but I don't think so. They didn't mention the helmet and pannier bag, so that didn't have any bearing and I spruced up well enough. But I struggle to 'speak the language of the business' as my current employer calls it on appraisals, and this new job seemed to be looking for the same kind of nonsense - how would I form relationships with external stakeholders? By not poking them in the eye.

    Nevermind either way. Current job allows me plenty of time to trawl this forum and play facebook scrabble. :)

    Having been exposed to endless corporate BS in my time I find it hard to engage in that sort of thing, moreso hard to big up myself in the same fashion.
  • It can work the other way, I once interviewed a ardent car driver who told me that cyclists shouldn't be allowed on the road and that they were a menace.

    That may have been a mistake, I feel.
  • EKE_38BPMEKE_38BPM Posts: 5,980
    It can work the other way, I once interviewed a ardent car driver who told me that cyclists shouldn't be allowed on the road and that they were a menace.
    Only when they are not wearing helmets.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    Many critieria:

    Depends on the job.

    Also I want to feel comfortable, mentally and physically, and not have to deal with the logisitics of a bicycle, sweat, fear of having a mechanical problem etc (sometimes cycling isn't the most practical option, I know, I know, but that is true).
    Food Chain number = 4

    A true scalp is not only overtaking someone but leaving them stopped at a set of lights. As you, who have clearly beaten the lights, pummels nothing but the open air ahead. ~ 'DondaddyD'. Player of the Unspoken Game
  • stu-bimstu-bim Posts: 406
    Interviewing for a job is as much about getting nothing wrong as it is about getting things right

    If being a cyclist could prejudice your chances because of some idiot who has a negative opinion of cycling then just for that day use PT, it won't kill you
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    (sometimes cycling isn't the most practical option, I know, I know, but that is true).
    This is true but it is worth it but it may influence someone negatively who doesn't understand the benefits

    You won't get sacked for commuting on a bike but you may miss the opportunity of a job
    Raleigh RX 2.0
    Diamondback Outlook
    Planet X Pro Carbon
  • stu-bim wrote:
    Interviewing for a job is as much about getting nothing wrong as it is about getting things right

    If being a cyclist could prejudice your chances because of some idiot who has a negative opinion of cycling then just for that day use PT, it won't kill you
    DonDaddyD wrote:
    (sometimes cycling isn't the most practical option, I know, I know, but that is true).
    This is true but it is worth it but it may influence someone negatively who doesn't understand the benefits

    You won't get sacked for commuting on a bike but you may miss the opportunity of a job

    there speaks the voice of conference!
  • kieranbkieranb Posts: 1,674
    kieranb wrote:
    I recently had an interview, cycled in my suit and put the helmet etc into a pannier. The first interviewer (my would be future manager) spotted the pannier and said 'ah!, a fellow cyclist'. We then chatted about commuting for a bit a nice ice breaker.

    Not trying to put you on the spot or pry into your business BUT did you get the job?

    Couldn't answer you earlier as I was still waiting to hear back, but got news last night, the answer is yes. To be honest I think the bike thing made little difference, the job requires technical skills and that was the critical point.
  • Drfabulous0Drfabulous0 Posts: 1,539
    An interview is a two way thing. If cycling was an issue I wouldn't want the job, in fact I always used to tell them up front I would be cycling and ask what facilities were available to accommodate. Luckily I am passed all that garbage now.

    Congrats on the new job.
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