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Which new wheels

littledove44littledove44 Posts: 871
edited November 2013 in Road buying advice
Santa has decreed that I am allowed to upgrade from the standard supplied wheels on my Roubaix to a new set that will make me go faster, use less effort and look cooler. :D

So, what should I do? How much do I need to spend to make a noticeable difference? What make/model?

No point in being silly, I guess as it is only a £1500 bike in the first place, but I ride about 100 miles a week, mostly 25 mile rides on reasonable roads, and I have a big 60 mile event coming up in spring that I especially would like the new wheels for.

Thanks.

Posts

  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    Mavic Ksyrium or Shimano C24 are bound to be the hot favourites among the forumite masses.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • smidsy wrote:
    Mavic Ksyrium or Shimano C24 are bound to be the hot favourites among the forumite masses.

    You'd get a great set of wheels for about 300 quid if you spoke to a decent wheel builder.

    Just to add some balance smidsy :D
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Santa has decreed that I am allowed to upgrade from the standard supplied wheels on my Roubaix to a new set that will make me go faster, use less effort and look cooler. :D

    mmm, well now, wheels to make you go faster and use less effort...perhaps best to settle for a set that will make you look cooler :)

    Anyway, not wanting to start that debate, £300+ is what you will need to spend to notice a difference but make sure you match with some nice tyres too. Oh, and try to avoid using your new wheels/tyres too much in the winter as the censored weather will wear the rims without any tangible benefit and the race tyres will cut up without adding any reasonable puncture protection. Now, best solution for worn rims: winter wheels or handbuilts...
  • Have a look at Swissside Heidi or franc wheels.
  • dowtchadowtcha Posts: 440
    Just bought some Mavic Ksyrium elite S for 320 Sterling from 4thebike.de. They came with mavic tyres and tubes which are only so so.
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    My brother loves his Ksyrium Elites, but whichever factory wheels you short list, have a look at what you can get in the form of a hand built for the same price, you'll be surprised !
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • I quite like the idea of hand built. Is there anyone good around Southampton, the New Forest or Isle of Wight?
  • If you're reasonably light (<12st) then for £300 RS80's are very hard to beat but at the same price handbuilts do really start to look like a nice option too.

    Really depends on budget and you.
  • If you're reasonably light (<12st) then for £300 RS80's are very hard to beat but at the same price handbuilts do really start to look like a nice option too.

    Really depends on budget and you.
    smidsy wrote:
    Mavic Ksyrium or Shimano C24 are bound to be the hot favourites among the forumite masses.
    I'm sorry you don't believe in miracles
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    Remember wheel builder can ship. £300 can buy you from a wheelbuilder wheels that will be low spoke count or high ans be sub 1500g or heavier. Most of the wheels I build are in the £250-£320 price bracket as that is all that needs to be spent to achieve most peoples needs. Commutor wheels can be for less. But let me squash one thing wheels without going for deep carbon rims are not going to make you faster as such. Ligther wheels will make the bike feel different and you will probably enjoy the change.

    When talking to a wheel builder decide what it you want. Wheels to make you faster (a bit that is not much maybe not even noticable) will be low spoke count - wait you stock wheels will be low spoke count won't they so what do you want from the wheels, looking cooler is possible and lighter is easy, faster no.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    You'd get a great set of wheels for about 300 quid if you spoke to a decent wheel builder. Just to add some balance smidsy :D

    Really - wow you learn something everyday :mrgreen:

    Oh and spoke to a wheel builder...like it, like it a lot :lol:
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Remember wheel builder can ship. £300 can buy you from a wheelbuilder wheels that will be low spoke count or high ans be sub 1500g or heavier. Most of the wheels I build are in the £250-£320 price bracket as that is all that needs to be spent to achieve most peoples needs. Commutor wheels can be for less. But let me squash one thing wheels without going for deep carbon rims are not going to make you faster as such. Ligther wheels will make the bike feel different and you will probably enjoy the change.

    When talking to a wheel builder decide what it you want. Wheels to make you faster (a bit that is not much maybe not even noticable) will be low spoke count - wait you stock wheels will be low spoke count won't they so what do you want from the wheels, looking cooler is possible and lighter is easy, faster no.
    Many thanks for that. I realise they can be shipped, but thought it would be nice to visit, chat etc. I weigh 90kg so I guess that is a consideration. The bike is not for commuting, but it's also not for racing. It's for fun, sportives etc.

    Yes, cooler is nice, but I was thinking lighter actually also means faster, albeit not much. If not, then why bother having light components in the first place.?

    Anecdotal evidence seems to be that better wheels are more responsive and make the bike feel quicker. I guess that is good enough for me for a few hundred quid or more. So, what do you recommend?
  • Remember wheel builder can ship. £300 can buy you from a wheelbuilder wheels that will be low spoke count or high ans be sub 1500g or heavier. Most of the wheels I build are in the £250-£320 price bracket as that is all that needs to be spent to achieve most peoples needs. Commutor wheels can be for less. But let me squash one thing wheels without going for deep carbon rims are not going to make you faster as such. Ligther wheels will make the bike feel different and you will probably enjoy the change.

    When talking to a wheel builder decide what it you want. Wheels to make you faster (a bit that is not much maybe not even noticable) will be low spoke count - wait you stock wheels will be low spoke count won't they so what do you want from the wheels, looking cooler is possible and lighter is easy, faster no.
    Many thanks for that. I realise they can be shipped, but thought it would be nice to visit, chat etc. I weigh 90kg so I guess that is a consideration. The bike is not for commuting, but it's also not for racing. It's for fun, sportives etc.

    Yes, cooler is nice, but I was thinking lighter actually also means faster, albeit not much. If not, then why bother having light components in the first place.?

    Anecdotal evidence seems to be that better wheels are more responsive and make the bike feel quicker. I guess that is good enough for me for a few hundred quid or more. So, what do you recommend?

    At your weight you have to be realistic and maybe those 1400 grams wheels are best left in the shop. If you can move away from dull heavy rims and big, chunky, harsh-feel spokes, that can only be beneficial, as they don't really add anything and they are censored from every angle.
    Wide rims feel nice, all of them, regardless of how cool/cheap or pricey they are. The all market is moving in that direction, albeit slowly. Deep rims don't have the same magic and they're nothing special.
    Ultegra 6800 hubs are probably the best bang for buck right now.. so I have pretty much steered you in the direction of what you should be looking at, innit? :wink:
  • Santa has decreed that I am allowed to upgrade from the standard supplied wheels on my Roubaix to a new set that will make me go faster, use less effort and look cooler. :D

    So, what should I do? How much do I need to spend to make a noticeable difference? What make/model?

    No point in being silly, I guess as it is only a £1500 bike in the first place, but I ride about 100 miles a week, mostly 25 mile rides on reasonable roads, and I have a big 60 mile event coming up in spring that I especially would like the new wheels for.

    Thanks.

    Based on the riding that you do, and are planning to do next year, what you hope to get from the wheels (less effort, good looks) and your weight, much of it will come down to your own personal opinion on what you like best. There are a number of options that I'm sure will meet and exceed all of your expectations, most of which have already been identified in this thread so once again it boils down to your personal preference.

    If you go lighter then remember that overall build quality and stiffness needs to be to a certain level otherwise any weight saving may be lost in lower efficiency. Go thorough the mental tick list and look for attributes such as durability, good hubs / bearings, stiffness, strength, aesthetics and overall ride quality. Check those and I'm sure whatever you choose you'll be smiling and eager to ride come spring!

    If you need any further advice or have any questions please feel free to message me directly and I'll do my best
    to help, or perhaps we can hook up for a ride in the forest sometime.

    Ride safe.

    Mike Cotty
    Mavic Community Manager
  • Coach HCoach H Posts: 1,092
    My two penneth.

    3 years ago I went through the same process, for much the same reasons and with the same goals. In the end I went for some Ksyrium Elites. Ugo offered to build me some wheels for a bit less. Ultimately I bought on looks.

    I have been perfectly happy, 'cos they have not broken, with the Mavics. I enjoy riding them, they look good, they "feel" better and I consider them good value for money, 'cos they have not broken. If I had to buy a set now I would probably go for handbuilts just for a change and am becoming more convinced that the serviceability/repairability trumps the low spoke count/flat spokes look (particualrly as everyones taste changes).

    What I can say is that whilst they "feel" better (they seem to roll faster, climb faster and are as comfortable as my other 2 wheelsets) I RIDE NO FASTER OR SLOWER ON ANY OF MY DIFFERENT WHEELSETS. I would love to say different but it would be a lie. OK there may be 0.5mph here and there but I never look at my Garmin and think WOW these wheels are making me noticably faster today.

    IMHO Buy what you like the look of. Buy handbuilts if you want to think they could be fixed if you had a mishap before your percieved end of use. Spend what you are happy to spend.

    You dont have to justify your purchace to us or yourself, you will always be able to 2nd guess yourself and you will ever get a concensus on a well populated forum.

    Suggestions are great but dont view them as recomendations

    (By the way, if it were my money I would get Ugo or thecycleclinic to build some HPlusSon Tb14s on Dura Ace or Campag Record hubs (depending on your groupset. Ultegra or Miche hubs if you need to hit a lower price point) with whatever spokes they prefer to use for that type of build. Just saying like :wink: )
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • smidsy wrote:
    You'd get a great set of wheels for about 300 quid if you spoke to a decent wheel builder. Just to add some balance smidsy :D

    Really - wow you learn something everyday :mrgreen:

    Oh and spoke to a wheel builder...like it, like it a lot :lol:


    Thanks smidsy. We aim to please :D
    "You really think you can burn off sugar with exercise?" downhill paul
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