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Couple of Winter Tips

bernithebikerbernithebiker Posts: 4,148
edited December 2013 in Road general
Some of these may be obvious to some out there, so don't rip me apart, but for those that may not know, this could help!

1. Use medium grit sandpaper to remove the crappy surface of your brake pads. They build up grease and dirt, and can glaze over. Especially for carbon rims, this gives them their bite back.

2. With Garmin Edge 500 (and presumably 800), they have a natty little HR graph that you can set to 1/3 of the screen. Gives you a great visual on your effort at this time of year when you want to keep the HR lowish/constant. HR Average is also useful for this.

3. Use the compass function on your main screen. Very useful for gauging effort against wind.

4. sat24.com and meteox.com very useful for checking on incoming cloud and rain in realtime.
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Posts

  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    Furniture polish, the cheaper the better on your protective glasses to make the rain flow off more easily. Do both sides and it helps to stop fogging.

    Don't stop, you'll just get cold or wet or both.

    Slow in = fast out on bends.

    Point and squirt keeps you upright longer on a bend (deeper line).

    Aim for the curb on an un-used roundabout to keep you away from diesel slops

    Put your best/winter/grippy tyre on the front
  • How do you get the hr graph on the 500?
  • elderoneelderone Posts: 1,410
    markynulty wrote:
    How do you get the hr graph on the 500?
    This ^^^^^^^
    Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Liking the 500 tips.. Could be useful
  • markynulty wrote:
    How do you get the hr graph on the 500?

    When you're setting up your data fields on your (up to 5, or 6?) screens, choose HR Graph, and have less than 5 things displaying and it'll take up 1/3 of the screen at the top.

    Makes long rides less boring, but remember to look at the road too....!
  • marcusjbmarcusjb Posts: 2,412
    HR graph is on the 800 as well. Quite a useful feature when out training.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    ...or set an alert for the top/bottom of the zone you want to train in. Makes things much easier than looking at a graph.

    Just set your MHR in Garmin connect, sync, and then select Alerts for the required zone from within Training.

    Personally though, I like thrashing it to keep me entertained :)
  • markynulty wrote:
    How do you get the hr graph on the 500?

    When you're setting up your data fields on your (up to 5, or 6?) screens, choose HR Graph, and have less than 5 things displaying and it'll take up 1/3 of the screen at the top.

    Makes long rides less boring, but remember to look at the road too....!

    Cheers for that! Will try it tomorrow.
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    My best tip is to enjoy your riding

    Don't get too bothered with keeping your HR low or any of that censored -just get some miles in and have some fun.
  • BozmanBozman Posts: 2,518
    As quoted, just get out and enjoy it because it's hard enough getting yourself out on the bike in the first place, add the fact that you are slower and it can get demoralising.
    When I know that I'm not going to be pulling up trees I'll go out to find new routes and hills, I did that yesterday and ended looking like I'd just finished the Paris Roubaix but I've got a new hilly section to add on to a run now.
  • slowbikeslowbike Posts: 8,498
    Muddy bits can be slippery .... as I found out this morning - slipped sideways off the road into the gulley and nearly came off :(
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    Give way to anything with antlers.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    And don't try running cheap tyres with no puncture protection in winter. You will get a rear puncture when you're furthest from the house, you've forgotten your phone, the light is failing and the rain is starting to fall.
  • My best tip is to enjoy your riding

    Don't get too bothered with keeping your HR low or any of that censored -just get some miles in and have some fun.

    I do enjoy it. But I think anyone would admit to a dull bit or two in a 100km ride, and as I have a geeky streak, I love a bit of HR tech.

    If I can keep my HR at low levels, I can ride further and more often without feeling too tired which is what I'm trying to do this winter (lots of easy, low stress miles). But occasionally the lure of a KOM is too much and it all goes out the window…….
  • redveeredvee Posts: 11,921
    Hibernate :lol:
    I've added a signature to prove it is still possible.
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    My best tip is to enjoy your riding

    Don't get too bothered with keeping your HR low or any of that censored -just get some miles in and have some fun.

    I do enjoy it. But I think anyone would admit to a dull bit or two in a 100km ride, and as I have a geeky streak, I love a bit of HR tech.

    If I can keep my HR at low levels, I can ride further and more often without feeling too tired which is what I'm trying to do this winter (lots of easy, low stress miles). But occasionally the lure of a KOM is too much and it all goes out the window…….


    http://chrisfroomelookingatstems.tumblr.com/ - reminds me of this haha :wink:

  • 4. sat24.com and meteox.com very useful for checking on incoming cloud and rain in realtime.

    I try not to look at the forecast in the winter. If I tried to avoid incoming cloud and rain I would never leave the house for 8 months. Just make sure I've got a waterproof and plenty of layers on and go for it :)
  • jordan_217jordan_217 Posts: 2,580
    Don't eat yellow snow.
    “Training is like fighting with a gorilla. You don’t stop when you’re tired. You stop when the gorilla is tired.”
  • chris_basschris_bass Posts: 4,913
    bit a stupid question, but what is the benefit of keeping your heart rate low?
    www.conjunctivitis.com - a site for sore eyes
  • Chris Bass wrote:
    bit a stupid question, but what is the benefit of keeping your heart rate low?

    Finish a ride less f***ed?

    My tip -

    Puncture proof tyres like Marathons. Take it (very) easy on bends and decents. Long sessions do circuits its boring but you dont want to be 50 miles from home in winter.
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    I would argue the opposite. If you are going to reduce the amount of training you do, then you want to get more benefit from the time spent in the saddle. For me that would be more focus on HIT and less mile munching.

    However, if motivation is the issue then I can see the logic in making it easier.

    In the winter the only reason I cycle in the censored is to keep my fitness up as best as I can.
  • Chris Bass wrote:
    bit a stupid question, but what is the benefit of keeping your heart rate low?

    A French ex-pro that I used to know in Geneva said that they used the 'petit plateau' rule for the winter. i.e. keep it in the small ring, never the big, nice and easy spinning.

    Not sure I agree with that 100%, but you get the gist. The French call it working the 'foncier', the foundations or the basics of something.

    I can't do 10 hours a week at high intensity at the moment, it would knacker me completely. But 10 hours at low level, fine, and it builds my base fitness for next year.
  • Chris Bass wrote:
    bit a stupid question, but what is the benefit of keeping your heart rate low?

    Winter training should, theoretically, be conducted with the aim in mind of longer, low intensity sessions in the main. These provide a steady base. Once weekly HIT session will take care of fitness for the duration of the winter. Combined, these provide the base for your harder spring training, which prioritises intensity. Essentially, the body can't be primed to produce its best at key points if it's being thrashed for fun the whole year round.

    That's the thinking, anyway.
  • Stringybob wrote:

    4. sat24.com and meteox.com very useful for checking on incoming cloud and rain in realtime.

    I try not to look at the forecast in the winter. If I tried to avoid incoming cloud and rain I would never leave the house for 8 months. Just make sure I've got a waterproof and plenty of layers on and go for it :)

    I partly agree and try not to let the threat of incoming bad weather put me off, though I do check the weather forecast carefully before going out for possible freezing conditions. Although not always noted on the BBC web site, e.g. when they are forecasting +2 - 3 deg, if the sky is clear there are likely to be patches of ice. I find it's worth getting to know which local roads are susceptible to ice and either avoiding them if the conditions don't look good or being very careful, I once had a short ride turn into a very long walk after I found my planned route consisted of miles of ice covered roads.
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    Essentially, the body can't be primed to produce its best at key points if it's being thrashed for fun the whole year round.

    That's the thinking, anyway.

    Makes a lot of sense - i.e. you are aiming to peak at the right time of the year.
  • BobbinogsBobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    diy wrote:
    Essentially, the body can't be primed to produce its best at key points if it's being thrashed for fun the whole year round.

    That's the thinking, anyway.

    Makes a lot of sense - i.e. you are aiming to peak at the right time of the year.

    Yeah, I have a feeling most of us normal cyclists get distracted by the training regimes of pros. They ride hard through the summer, often with little chance of real recovery whereas the rest of us can have the odd week off when we want and we do not need to be working towards a specific peak. So, I kind of buy into the concept of 'winter miles' but in reality I just like cycling so my winter regime is not that different from my summer one except that I don't do the 200-250k rides in the winter due to the cold and dark. If I cannot get out for a few days then the odd HIT on the turbo can make up a bit but obviously needs to be topped up with some kind of endurance ride at some point, which the weather often allows if you seize the day when the opportunity presents itself.

    I guess I could make myself a 'better' rider with a more dedicated programme but if I went to a trainer and he asked me what my cycling goals were, I would just say "cycling" and then add "fast" :)
  • In winter I prefer laps of a smaller circuit (say 20 miles) rather than a long route, same for wet rides-it's nice to know when heading out that I can bail on the ride if need be
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster"
  • unixnerdunixnerd Posts: 2,864
    Carry spare light batteries

    Don't have just one source of front or rear light in case it dies

    Once you've used a head torch as a secondary light you'll wonder why you didn't do it before, doesn't have to be super bright

    Put on waterproofs before you get wet or you'll just boil in the bag

    Mountain biking can be fun when it's not road bike weather, honestly

    You only live once, use the nice bike and enjoy it - it won't melt and if things wear out it's an excuse for an upgrade.

    Fit mudguards

    I don't care how ugly my neoprene overshoes look.

    Get a skull cap or balaclava

    Riding at night is fun and modern lights are cheap yet powerful

    Don't cycle on white lines or anything metal.

    Try to avoid cycling into a low sun, drivers can't see you. Safer to wait until after sunset.

    Bolle safety glass cost three quid, look OK and work great in the winter. Many styles available.
    http://www.strathspey.co.uk - Quality Binoculars at a Sensible Price.
    Specialized Roubaix SL3 Expert 2012, Cannondale CAAD5,
    Marin Mount Vision (1997), Edinburgh Country tourer, 3 cats!
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    Chris Bass wrote:
    bit a stupid question, but what is the benefit of keeping your heart rate low?

    Winter training should, theoretically, be conducted with the aim in mind of longer, low intensity sessions in the main. These provide a steady base. Once weekly HIT session will take care of fitness for the duration of the winter. Combined, these provide the base for your harder spring training, which prioritises intensity. Essentially, the body can't be primed to produce its best at key points if it's being thrashed for fun the whole year round.

    That's the thinking, anyway.

    I just average 161 bpm for 3 hours.. that's Zone 3/4 so HA.. who needs base training? :lol:
  • unixnerd wrote:
    Carry spare light batteries

    Don't have just one source of front or rear light in case it dies

    Once you've used a head torch as a secondary light you'll wonder why you didn't do it before, doesn't have to be super bright

    Put on waterproofs before you get wet or you'll just boil in the bag

    Mountain biking can be fun when it's not road bike weather, honestly

    You only live once, use the nice bike and enjoy it - it won't melt and if things wear out it's an excuse for an upgrade.

    Fit mudguards

    I don't care how ugly my neoprene overshoes look.

    Get a skull cap or balaclava

    Riding at night is fun and modern lights are cheap yet powerful

    Don't cycle on white lines or anything metal.

    Try to avoid cycling into a low sun, drivers can't see you. Safer to wait until after sunset.

    Bolle safety glass cost three quid, look OK and work great in the winter. Many styles available.

    Can you recommend a particular style of safety glasses as being most suitable for cycling, when I looked online there seemed to be a wide range of styles leaving me somewhat confused (a state I seem to get in whenever I start looking at bikes and bike related gear!)
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