What bike?

fitzkate
fitzkate Posts: 12
edited December 2013 in Commuting chat
I am a relatively new cyclist and have been commuting to work for the last year. It is a 10 mile round trip on cycle paths which are a mixture of tarmacked and not. I have a Specialized Crosstrail 2012 Hybrid Bike which is fine at the minute but I've never been 100% happy with it. I am changing jobs and my commute will now be a 13 mile round trip on roads and I would like to upgrade my bike. I am not particularly keen on drop handlebars (a bit scared in fact) and need to keep the bike under £1k for the bike to work scheme. I have started my research and was advised in a local bike shop to go for a bike which is more the road end of the hybrid. I have been recommended a Whyte Pimlico or Victoria but obviously there are loads of bikes out there and I don't know where to start! I am also confused as to whether I would require carbon forks or not? I also need the bike to be suitable for guards and panniers - I don't ask much!

Any help would be appreciated! :D
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Comments

  • cyclingprop
    cyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    What makes you not 100% about what you have? What would you change? (Also don't forget that just because a bike has drops doesnt mean you need to use them ;) ).

    Will you just use it for commuting or some recreation too?
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • msmancunia
    msmancunia Posts: 1,415
    Why don't you try out a bike with drops and see how you get on? Try and find a girl-friendly bike shop too

    I commuted on a hybrid before buying a road bike on C2W nearly three years ago when my commute upped to 13 miles each way. I was terrified as I left the shop, but by the time I got home seven miles later I'd fallen in love with it. I also took 15 mins off my commute on the first day on my new bike :D
    Commute: Chadderton - Sportcity
  • If you ride on the hoods rather than the drops, the positioning on a road bike need not feel particularly aggressive.

    Perhaps more of an issue (at least as reported to me by Mrs 66 and 66 major (f)) is braking from the hoods with small hands. As you're on the top of the lever rather than the bottom, you need proportionately more pull to get the brakes to be effective. And if your fingers are only just reaching them, that can be an issue.

    You may find (I don't know, because I've not tried it out) that a CX bike with drops and disc brakes is a good compromise on the braking front. Plus you'd run wider tyres that the skinnies found on most road bikes.

    I wouldn't get hung up on "needing" a carbon fork. Work out what overall package suits you best, find something that ticks those boxes and fits you, and whatever fork it has will be fine.

    ETA: a quick google suggests that there is a Boardman CX bike that will take paniers and sits around the £1000 C2W price point. Haven't looked for it though...
    Swim. Bike. Run. Yeah. That's what I used to do.

    Bike 1
    Bike 2-A
  • I'd recommend the Hoy Sa Calobra 003 - 1k for good bits of kit, wont get one till next year however - fork issues atm. Try drops before making any judgement on a bike that fits you size wise. I had thought I wouldn't like drop because of arthritic hip issues. Tbh I rarely go on the bottoms bits and stay on drops majority of time and its all good.
    As Mr Gv 2.0 has said you might like a cross instead/as well (N+1) as always.
    Try them out. About 3-4 bikes in the 750-1k range for road bikes. As a slicked mtb rider for YEARS and more than happy with it I would definitely suggest you try road bikes - especially with 13 miles each way.

    and I know find my mtb feels more aggressive than my road bike now... go figure.
    Le Cannon [98 Cannondale M400] [FCN: 8]
    The Mad Monkey [2013 Hoy 003] [FCN: 4]
  • sketchley
    sketchley Posts: 4,238
    msmancunia wrote:
    Why don't you try out a bike with drops and see how you get on? Try and find a girl-friendly bike shop too

    I commuted on a hybrid before buying a road bike on C2W nearly three years ago when my commute upped to 13 miles each way. I was terrified as I left the shop, but by the time I got home seven miles later I'd fallen in love with it. I also took 15 mins off my commute on the first day on my new bike :D

    +1 on this. Nothing wrong with a flat bar road bike but despite being really scared going from one to a drop bar I was converted in minutes of leaving the shop. It's all in the head.
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    For 13 miles a day I would definitely go drop bars rather than flats.
    With flat bars you have one hand position, two if you have bar ends.
    With drop bars you have the tops, the hoods, the drops and right at the ends of the bars. Those variations mean you are less likely to be uncomfortable on a ride for too long (assuming your bike fits you properly).
    tips_handpositions_wlabel05.gif
    As our resident triantelope (Greg66) says, some people may find braking less effective from the hoods. You can get interrupter levers which allow you to brake from the tops.
    inlinebrake-615.jpg

    Don't get hung up on carbon forks. I'd much rather have fatter tyres to soak up the bumps than carbon forks.

    You will have realised that many of us on here are steering you away from hybrids and towards drop bar road bikes. The many combined years of cycle experience we have accrued has lead so many of us to see that for lots of riding (and 65 miles a week counts as a lot of riding) drops are the way forward, especially if you are riding on the road.

    Mrs EKE is now happily riding her drop bar bike with step through frame after years of riding flat bar bikes and loves her interrupter levers.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • supersonic
    supersonic Posts: 82,708
    I use flat bars - it is purely personal preference. I prefer a wider bar and the shifting and braking ergonomics, as do many others. So the upshot is go for what suits you best.
  • Thanks for all your feedback! It has certainly given me a lot to think about and I will definitely try out drops in order to make my mind up once and for all.
  • Hi everyone,
    So I made it to the Edinburgh Bike Co-op this weekend and tried out drop handlebars and you are all correct - nowhere near as scary as I thought and a much more comfortable ride. That's one decision made but now I have a big decision on what actual bike...I think for my commute - mix of road and on occasion on a un-tarmacked cycle path - a cyclocross is my best option. I think I would prefer a bike with secondary bar-top brake levers and I was recommended the following two bikes:
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes
    Does anyone have any experience with either of these bikes or would you be able to recommend another bike with a similar spec please? Bearing in mind I have to stick to the Bike Co-op and come in under £1k for C2W.
    Thanks, K
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,568
    Out of those two I would go for the Specialized as it has a better spec, but mainly for the better brakes. Disc brakes do need bedding in at first so they may well feel dreadful for the first few goes, but they are well worth it.
  • If you're near an Evans it might be worth looking at this one as well. Bit better spec with BB7 and 105:

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec054866
    Trek Domane 4.3. Merida One.forty 7.700. Merida CX 3. Voodoo Bizango
    "When the vulture flies sideways the moon has hair on his upper lip"
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    If you're near an Evans it might be worth looking at this one as well. Bit better spec with BB7 and 105:

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec054866
    fitzkate wrote:
    Bearing in mind I have to stick to the Bike Co-op and come in under £1k for C2W.
    Thanks, K

    :roll: :roll:

    The CAADX looks nice and can take a rack and guards - never heard of the brakes though.
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • Wow the Tricross disc is one lovely looking bike. If I didn't have 2 CX bikes already....

    specialized-tricross-sport-disc-14.jpg
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • cyclingprop
    cyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    Sounds like you're doing well. Don't forget to factor some budget for the cape you'll need to go with your CX.
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    I have seen one of the tri-cross sport discs in the flesh and they are very nice (I have started a revolution of Disc/road/Cx bikes).
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • tilt
    tilt Posts: 214
    supersonic wrote:
    I use flat bars - it is purely personal preference. I prefer a wider bar and the shifting and braking ergonomics, as do many others. So the upshot is go for what suits you best.

    Me too.

    I use a flat bar bike and commute 23 miles a day on it with no issues. I'd definitely take a look at the Boardman Hybrids (I've got the Comp, would love the Pro though!)

    http://www.boardmanbikes.com/hybrid/hybrid_pro.html
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    A few weeks ago I was in Edinburgh Bike Co-op and tried their Revolution Cross Pro. I thought it was a really good bike and definitely considered it.
    Add some interrupter levers and it fits your specification whilst still under budget.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • rubertoe wrote:
    If you're near an Evans it might be worth looking at this one as well. Bit better spec with BB7 and 105:

    http://www.evanscycles.com/products/pin ... e-ec054866
    fitzkate wrote:
    Bearing in mind I have to stick to the Bike Co-op and come in under £1k for C2W.
    Thanks, K

    :roll: :roll:

    The CAADX looks nice and can take a rack and guards - never heard of the brakes though.

    Sorry, I skip read and missed 'Bike Co-op' bit. :oops:
    Trek Domane 4.3. Merida One.forty 7.700. Merida CX 3. Voodoo Bizango
    "When the vulture flies sideways the moon has hair on his upper lip"
  • leodis75
    leodis75 Posts: 184
    I much prefer flat bars for commuting, you get a far better view point and you can get hydr discs which are way better than the constant tinkering and messing about with BB7's. I use drops at weekends over longer distances on my Ribble but didnt feel safe in the winter rain on rim brakes.

    If I could get a Halfords on Cyclescheme I would go for their 105 commuter but can't.
  • The Rookie
    The Rookie Posts: 27,812
    Personally I prefer flats, although I'm running no spacers and a flipped stem so they are pretty low, I'm using the 'interupter' style lever by itself with road bike pull disc callipers as it makes a nice light and low clutter combo (along with a twist shift).

    Road bars, loads of different hand positions, none of them comfortable!
    Currently riding a Whyte T130C, X0 drivetrain, Magura Trail brakes converted to mixed wheel size (homebuilt wheels) with 140mm Fox 34 Rhythm and RP23 suspension. 12.2Kg.
  • fitzkate wrote:
    Hi everyone,
    So I made it to the Edinburgh Bike Co-op this weekend and tried out drop handlebars and you are all correct - nowhere near as scary as I thought and a much more comfortable ride. That's one decision made but now I have a big decision on what actual bike...I think for my commute - mix of road and on occasion on a un-tarmacked cycle path - a cyclocross is my best option. I think I would prefer a bike with secondary bar-top brake levers and I was recommended the following two bikes:
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes
    Does anyone have any experience with either of these bikes or would you be able to recommend another bike with a similar spec please? Bearing in mind I have to stick to the Bike Co-op and come in under £1k for C2W.
    Thanks, K

    The giant revolt 1, which has better components, also is within your budget at £999 and has 10 speed (Tiagra?) gears and better wheels apparently. I saw one of those in the window of my local Giant dealer and thought it looked very nice indeed. I am not sure if this is available to you but the Trek Crossrip also looks very nice too IMO: http://www.trekbikes.com/uk/en/bikes/ro ... /crossrip/

    good luck with whatever you choose!
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    The giant revolt 1...I saw one of those in the window of my local Giant dealer and thought it looked very nice indeed.
    should-have-gone-to-specsavers.png

    It is called the Revolt because it looks revolting. I'm not sure which is worse, the Revolt:
    Revolt_0.jpg
    or the Anyroad:
    giant-anyroad-1-14.jpg

    Both fugly, as the kids say.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • wgwarburton
    wgwarburton Posts: 1,863
    Hi,
    I would avoid a CX bike. I know they are trendy and that can mean that they are good value due to competition but they are not as good for riding on roads and trails as a road bike. I don't mean a race bike I mean a road bike-a tourer or similar.
    Have a look at this-
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ring-bikes
    and give it some thought.
    CX bikes tend not to come with guards, are overengineered for road use and the setup is often compromised by wide shallow-drop bars interrupter levers and race orientated groupsets .
    For reliable, comfortable commuting a tourer is a better match, if you can find one sensibly priced.

    Cheers,
    W.
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    Hi,
    I would avoid a CX bike. I know they are trendy and that can mean that they are good value due to competition but they are not as good for riding on roads and trails as a road bike. I don't mean a race bike I mean a road bike-a tourer or similar.
    Have a look at this-
    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ring-bikes
    and give it some thought.
    CX bikes tend not to come with guards, are overengineered for road use and the setup is often compromised by wide shallow-drop bars interrupter levers and race orientated groupsets .
    For reliable, comfortable commuting a tourer is a better match, if you can find one sensibly priced.

    Cheers,
    W.

    Nice looking bike, good groupset. Personally, I'd want discs and it's not the lightest bike in the world (stated weight for a large is 12.4 kg excl pedals).


    Just as the OP has seen the light WRT drop bars, I suggest this as an option: http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... b-2-0-disc
    Flat bar road bike (also known as a hybrid), SRAM Apex groupset, AVID Elixir 3 hydraulic disc brakes, alu frame with carbon fork and a stated weight of 10kg for the medium.
    I'll keep an eye out for Eastway in the future. Could be a rising brand.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • mrfpb
    mrfpb Posts: 4,569
    When looking at weight on on the Ed Bike Co-op site, bear in mind that they quote weights for "road legal" bikes ie with pedals, reflectors and a bell which bike shops are required by law to include. Mail order sites and manufactures sites quote weights without those bits. Touring bike weights include rack and mudguards, which you would add to a cx bike.

    Anyway, weight is probably not a great consideration when a bike needs to be a workhorse.
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    mrfpb wrote:
    When looking at weight on on the Ed Bike Co-op site, bear in mind that they quote weights for "road legal" bikes ie with pedals, reflectors and a bell which bike shops are required by law to include.
    Au contraire
    Ask a question
    Q. Whats the weight of the eastway?
    A. We have not managed to weigh the Eastway ST 1.0 however for reference Eastway give the approximate weight of the bike in medium as 12.1kg. This would be for the bike as received with mudguards fitted (though not pedals).
    mrfpb wrote:
    Mail order sites and manufactures sites quote weights without those bits. Touring bike weights include rack and mudguards, which you would add to a cx bike.

    Anyway, weight is probably not a great consideration when a bike needs to be a workhorse.
    Agreed. Have a look at my recent post in the Boardman CX Owners Thread where I argue the toss about this exact thing.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • mrfpb
    mrfpb Posts: 4,569
    EKE_38BPM wrote:
    Au contraire
    Edinburgh Bike Co-Op wrote:
    Ask a question
    Q. Whats the weight of the eastway?
    A. We have not managed to weigh the Eastway ST 1.0 however for reference Eastway give the approximate weight of the bike in medium as 12.1kg. This would be for the bike as received with mudguards fitted (though not pedals).

    They've contradicted theselves then as I was quoting their tech details page. Also I didn't notice the Eastway has no rack. Odd for a tourer.
  • EKE_38BPM wrote:
    The giant revolt 1...I saw one of those in the window of my local Giant dealer and thought it looked very nice indeed.
    should-have-gone-to-specsavers.png

    It is called the Revolt because it looks revolting. I'm not sure which is worse, the Revolt:
    Revolt_0.jpg
    or the Anyroad:
    giant-anyroad-1-14.jpg

    Both fugly, as the kids say.

    It's all in the eye of the beholder you know! Actually I totally agree with you about the anyroad and i had not been impressed by any pictures I saw of the revolt but, in the flesh (or at least in the window of the bike shop) it looked pretty good actually. It was telling that as the bike was getting taken down from the display so that i could get a better look at it, another passer by came in to see the bike too - he told me that the bike had caught his eye as he walked past the window...
  • EKE_38BPM
    EKE_38BPM Posts: 5,821
    It's all in the eye of the beholder you know! Actually I totally agree with you about the anyroad and i had not been impressed by any pictures I saw of the revolt but, in the flesh (or at least in the window of the bike shop) it looked pretty good actually. It was telling that as the bike was getting taken down from the display so that i could get a better look at it, another passer by came in to see the bike too - he told me that the bike had caught his eye as he walked past the window...

    Have you seen the plastic integrated mudguard and cable guide on the Revolt(ing).
    Or the stupid kink in the chain stay.
    Or the 'staggered junction' at the seat stay/seat tube/top tube.


    So much ugly crammed onto one bike.
    FCN 3: Raleigh Record Ace fixie-to be resurrected sometime in the future
    FCN 4: Planet X Schmaffenschmack 2- workhorse
    FCN 9: B Twin Vitamin - winter commuter/loan bike for trainees

    I'm hungry. I'm always hungry!
  • I've just gone from tourer (Dawes Galaxy in it's late teens) -> disc CXish bike (Kaff 2). My thoughts on each

    Plueses for the tourer:
    - Separate eyelets for panniers/mudguards means everything fits just right, and of course it came that way. Could easily take a front rack too if I ever felt the need (I never have though).
    - Better clearances - would probably take 37mm tyres (used 32's with plenty of space to spare)

    Pluses for the Kaff
    - Discs! in the wet or after riding along a muddy track, braking is just fine.
    - A bit lighter. It's no feather weight though.
    - Feels good to ride when unladen - when I can grab a quick hour or longer, I want to go for a ride - this wasn't so much the case with the Galaxy (this could be me jutifying my purchase however - if I ever get a lightweight carbon jobbie, I'll probably denigrate the Kaff in the same way)

    As a workhorse, I think a disc-equipped tourer (like this: http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ring-bikes ) would be hard to beat. Comes with everything you need (ok, except interruptor levers, but they can be added by the shop).

    However, if you want to do more than just ride to work and back, you might want to consider what that 'more' is.