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Does anyone use a Bike Pannier?

rihankhanrihankhan Posts: 2
edited October 2013 in Commuting chat
Hi, just wondering if anyone uses a pannier with their bikes?
Is there any problems you face with this equipment?
I'm thinking to buy one for shopping or gym clothes use.

Thanks

Posts

  • fatsmokerfatsmoker Posts: 585
    Yes. Halfords rack and single-side Avenir pannier for my commute (as my back gets sweaty enough as it is). No problems as long as you don't allow one of your kids to screw in the bolts and censored up the threads so the rack is now permanently fixed to the bike - not a good look when on a club run or TT :cry:

    If you have massive feet your heel might flick the pannier.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    I switched to panniers after I broke my arm earlier in the year. I was carrying a heavy rucksack, hit the back of a van and broke my arm because of the huge weight on my back. Ambulance crew advised me to use panniers as they see a lot of back and spinal injuries caused in bike accidents from rucksacks... I always use 2, I like the bike to feel and look balanced. It takes a little getting used to as the bike feels heavier and "dead". It also bumps hard over potholes etc as you can't lift yourself and your rucksack off the bike to smooth the ride over uneven surfaces. I'm pretty used to it now though but when you take the panniers off and ride without it takes a mile or 2 to get used to the new feel of the bike - it feels far more skittish and jumpy.
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • I use panniers on my hybrid for shopping and stuff and have never had a problem, much prefer carrying it on the pannier compared to a rucksack.

    Only thing I use a rucksack for is my laptop or if I'm going to be carrying stuff off the bike. My panniers are failry cheap so are annoying to carry for more then 5 min or so. In terms of my laptop I've heard panniers jolt them a lot more than a rucksack which can mess up the hard drive, I prefer not to take the risk.
  • davmaggsdavmaggs Posts: 1,008
    I was a rucksack user and switched to a pannier bag severals years ago and would not go back. I don't want the lumpy items sticking into me, or being under me when a crash occurs, issues with my back, higher centre of gravity or extra heat. And, the roll type bags are almost completely waterproof and rucksacks aren't.

    As for the laptop HD point; seems like an urban myth to me.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    davmaggs wrote:
    As for the laptop HD point; seems like an urban myth to me.
    Could be an issue if you left the laptop running.

    Panniers are a no-brainer for me (I normally just use one). Why would you want to carry the additional weight on your back, and transfer the load to the bike via your back, bum, arms and hands, when you could just attach it straight to the bike and be done with it? Not having a rucksack also leaves your pockets free for things you might need on the ride, like keys, office pass, gilet, sunglasses etc.

    I don't buy the argument about the bike bumping harder over potholes. Most commuting bikes are probably over 10kg, and the extra load from a couple of kg of clothes/inner tubes really isn't going to make a difference. If you're carrying more than a few kg, you *really* don't want it to be in a rucksack. If you feel that strongly, do you also put your water bottle(s) in your rucksack or back pockets?
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    TGOTB wrote:
    davmaggs wrote:
    As for the laptop HD point; seems like an urban myth to me.
    Could be an issue if you left the laptop running.

    Panniers are a no-brainer for me (I normally just use one). Why would you want to carry the additional weight on your back, and transfer the load to the bike via your back, bum, arms and hands, when you could just attach it straight to the bike and be done with it? Not having a rucksack also leaves your pockets free for things you might need on the ride, like keys, office pass, gilet, sunglasses etc.

    I don't buy the argument about the bike bumping harder over potholes. Most commuting bikes are probably over 10kg, and the extra load from a couple of kg of clothes/inner tubes really isn't going to make a difference. If you're carrying more than a few kg, you *really* don't want it to be in a rucksack. If you feel that strongly, do you also put your water bottle(s) in your rucksack or back pockets?

    Well I have definitely noticed that the bike bumps harder over imperfections in the road. When you carry a rucksack you have more ability to alter the weight over the bike as the luggage is attached to you so you can shift the weight forwards or backwards or whatever. If you're carrying 5-10kg of stuff in panniers, the back end of the bike inevitably bumps over things quite hard...
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    Well I have definitely noticed that the bike bumps harder over imperfections in the road. When you carry a rucksack you have more ability to alter the weight over the bike as the luggage is attached to you so you can shift the weight forwards or backwards or whatever. If you're carrying 5-10kg of stuff in panniers, the back end of the bike inevitably bumps over things quite hard...
    5-10kg would be a lot to carry in a backpack though; even 5kg is equivalent to 2 six-packs of beer...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • Rucksacks are for noobs.
  • will3will3 Posts: 2,173
    Panniers all the way.
    1) No sweaty load on your back
    2) less weight through your Rs
    3) less strain on your shoulders
    4) weight lower down so it doesn't wiggle as much

    That said I once carried an 8kg bench vice home 10 miles in a rucksack.
    as said, back then I was best described as a noob.

    Panniers rock
    Trailers roll
  • mrfpbmrfpb Posts: 4,543
    I use panniers for work and shopping. Tried using a backpack for while for ease of transfer at the destination but I soon got fed up with the weight on my backside. I use a backpack now only for a two mile trip to the train station as it's quick, anything longer I'll use a pannier that converts to a shoulder bag. I use different items from the Edinburgh bike co-op Revolution range. They've worn really well and the Adventure panniers are a good size for a shopping trip. Unfortunately they discontinued their laptop/briefcase pannier. I got some Union 34 ones this year but they are extremely fiddly to convert. I use Exped waterproof bags for separating stuff in wet weather or for packing smelly clothes at the office.

    The only other thing to note is that disc brakes require a different type of rack.
  • crakercraker Posts: 1,739
    CubeMark wrote:
    Rucksacks are for noobs.

    Look, I know this is a pro pannier thread 'n all, I'm certainly no noob. For the weights I commute with (lets say 2kg is typical - clothes but no shoes, essential tools + extra layers for cycling) I'm fairly ambivalent. Doesn't make my back any more sweaty, there's a reassuring rucksack attached to your back feeling (ever had a pannier detach at 20 mph? Not since I got decent ones :D ).

    My favourite commuter du jour is my single speed - hasn't got a rack, can't see climbing out of the saddle being the same experience with bags attached either side. So if you regularly carry alot, try not to or get a decent pannier system.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,035
    Having now slipped a disc with a trapped nerve i've not ridden anything more than a few miles for more than two months, so if I get this fixed i'll NOT be riding with a rucksack or messenger bag anytime soon.

    I have panniers on a bike I left at Paddington station last Feb/March, might still be there :roll:
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    Couple of other points for the OP:

    Ortlieb panniers seem to be the gold standard; I've been using mine for 4 years and still going strong. Some other brands may be as good, or better value for money, but I don't recall anyone claiming a different brand was better.

    For commuting, having a pannier which is totally and utterly 100% waterproof is brilliant, especially in the Winter. Or rather, having one which wasn't 100% waterproof would be a real pain.

    Don't worry about a single pannier "unbalancing" your bike. I generally ride with a single one, and if someone else attached it I wouldn't be able to tell you which side it was on without looking.
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • rubertoerubertoe Posts: 3,994
    I must be a right noob.... I only ever use a rucksack. And I carry everything in it.

    noob.
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • tilttilt Posts: 214
    I use a topeak rack (for discs) with Altura Dryline panniers. Love it, wouldn't go back to a rucksack now. Tbf I tend to carry quite a lot of gear with me.
  • TonymufcTonymufc Posts: 1,016
    After riding for over 12 years I finally converted to using panniers. I have 2 but really only use the one. Its impressive the amount of kit you can carry in one of these. And as already pointed out once you're used to riding with the extra weight you'll not notice you'll never go back to a rucksack.
  • I find a basket the best place for cycling gear and shopping. Can easily get at it while riding along.
    The rear rack and panniers are good for things which you don't mind stopping to get at.
    What do you mean you don't have a basket? :)
    Most useful thing on a bike, and I have a theory it reduces the likelihood of the bike being stolen.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    DexterWard wrote:
    I find a basket the best place for cycling gear and shopping. Can easily get at it while riding along.
    The rear rack and panniers are good for things which you don't mind stopping to get at.
    What do you mean you don't have a basket? :)
    Most useful thing on a bike, and I have a theory it reduces the likelihood of the bike being stolen.

    Basket is pretty high up the list of requirements for my pub/station bike...
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • asprillaasprilla Posts: 8,440
    Rucksacks or panniers? Noobs.

    I use a Carradice saddle bag 99% of the time now. Having used rucksacks, messenger bags and panniers in the past, I find these to be easily the best option.

    If I need to carry something bulky then I use a rucksack, need to carry a laptop then I use my laptop / messenger bag, need to carry something uber heavy then I use panniers, but most of the time my Carradice will do.
    Mud - Genesis Vapour CCX
    Race - Fuji Norcom Straight
    Sun - Cervelo R3
    Winter / Commute - Dolan ADX
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    TGOTB wrote:
    Well I have definitely noticed that the bike bumps harder over imperfections in the road. When you carry a rucksack you have more ability to alter the weight over the bike as the luggage is attached to you so you can shift the weight forwards or backwards or whatever. If you're carrying 5-10kg of stuff in panniers, the back end of the bike inevitably bumps over things quite hard...
    5-10kg would be a lot to carry in a backpack though; even 5kg is equivalent to 2 six-packs of beer...
    I always have at least 5kg in my panniers - the 2 D locks weigh at least 3kg between them, then there's my packed lunch and packed breakfast and assorted other work [email protected] Easily 5-10kg. When I go food shopping at the weekend I've hit 30kg+ between 2 panniers and a rucksack for the weekly shop
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    TGOTB wrote:
    Well I have definitely noticed that the bike bumps harder over imperfections in the road. When you carry a rucksack you have more ability to alter the weight over the bike as the luggage is attached to you so you can shift the weight forwards or backwards or whatever. If you're carrying 5-10kg of stuff in panniers, the back end of the bike inevitably bumps over things quite hard...
    5-10kg would be a lot to carry in a backpack though; even 5kg is equivalent to 2 six-packs of beer...
    I always have at least 5kg in my panniers - the 2 D locks weigh at least 3kg between them, then there's my packed lunch and packed breakfast and assorted other work [email protected] Easily 5-10kg. When I go food shopping at the weekend I've hit 30kg+ between 2 panniers and a rucksack for the weekly shop
    My point (which you've kind-of illustrated) was that by the time you're carrying enough weight to affect the handling of the bike significantly, you really don't want to be carrying it in a rucksack anyway.
    Pannier, 120rpm.
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,035
    FWIW my lightest rucksack or messenger bag weight would be 22lbs and anything up to 30lbs on the way home and yes of course i've weighed them.

    Anyone want to buy a fairly new red timbuk2 messenger bag :?
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 25,291 Lives Here
    TGOTB wrote:
    DexterWard wrote:
    I find a basket the best place for cycling gear and shopping. Can easily get at it while riding along.
    The rear rack and panniers are good for things which you don't mind stopping to get at.
    What do you mean you don't have a basket? :)
    Most useful thing on a bike, and I have a theory it reduces the likelihood of the bike being stolen.

    Basket is pretty high up the list of requirements for my pub/station bike...
    Basket on the wife's station hack is the dog's danglies. Legs supporting it from the front axle nuts so it can carry a lot of booze. Makes the steering a bit odd if overloaded.
    Definitely the way to go for a pub/station bike.
  • TGOTB wrote:
    Ortlieb panniers seem to be the gold standard; I've been using mine for 4 years and still going strong. Some other brands may be as good, or better value for money, but I don't recall anyone claiming a different brand was better.

    Mine are 3 years old. One is used daily... and the other is used occasionally (once a quarter or so) but they both look pretty much identical. No obvious signs of wear and tear. They are rock solid.

    The only 'bad' thing about them is the lack of any small accessible outside pocket which means that you have to open the main compartment to get anything out which, when it's wet, is a bit annoying.

    Overall though, they've been brilliant. I've brought home two sacks of compost (20kg each) in them - admittedly hanging out the top!
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    TGOTB wrote:
    TGOTB wrote:
    Well I have definitely noticed that the bike bumps harder over imperfections in the road. When you carry a rucksack you have more ability to alter the weight over the bike as the luggage is attached to you so you can shift the weight forwards or backwards or whatever. If you're carrying 5-10kg of stuff in panniers, the back end of the bike inevitably bumps over things quite hard...
    5-10kg would be a lot to carry in a backpack though; even 5kg is equivalent to 2 six-packs of beer...
    I always have at least 5kg in my panniers - the 2 D locks weigh at least 3kg between them, then there's my packed lunch and packed breakfast and assorted other work [email protected] Easily 5-10kg. When I go food shopping at the weekend I've hit 30kg+ between 2 panniers and a rucksack for the weekly shop
    My point (which you've kind-of illustrated) was that by the time you're carrying enough weight to affect the handling of the bike significantly, you really don't want to be carrying it in a rucksack anyway.
    Yeah when I broke my arm I was carrying prob over 20kg in a 70 litre rucksack... Never again!
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • davmaggsdavmaggs Posts: 1,008
    TGOTB wrote:
    Ortlieb panniers seem to be the gold standard; I've been using mine for 4 years and still going strong. Some other brands may be as good, or better value for money, but I don't recall anyone claiming a different brand was better.

    Mine are 3 years old. One is used daily... and the other is used occasionally (once a quarter or so) but they both look pretty much identical. No obvious signs of wear and tear. They are rock solid.

    The only 'bad' thing about them is the lack of any small accessible outside pocket which means that you have to open the main compartment to get anything out which, when it's wet, is a bit annoying.

    Overall though, they've been brilliant. I've brought home two sacks of compost (20kg each) in them - admittedly hanging out the top!

    The Vaude Aqua range are like the Ortliebs, but with the outside pocket and I cannot understate how useful (and nice) having that is.

    If you are going to use your bike a fair bit, then spend the extra.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    davmaggs wrote:
    TGOTB wrote:
    Ortlieb panniers seem to be the gold standard; I've been using mine for 4 years and still going strong. Some other brands may be as good, or better value for money, but I don't recall anyone claiming a different brand was better.

    Mine are 3 years old. One is used daily... and the other is used occasionally (once a quarter or so) but they both look pretty much identical. No obvious signs of wear and tear. They are rock solid.

    The only 'bad' thing about them is the lack of any small accessible outside pocket which means that you have to open the main compartment to get anything out which, when it's wet, is a bit annoying.

    Overall though, they've been brilliant. I've brought home two sacks of compost (20kg each) in them - admittedly hanging out the top!

    The Vaude Aqua range are like the Ortliebs, but with the outside pocket and I cannot understate how useful (and nice) having that is.

    If you are going to use your bike a fair bit, then spend the extra.
    I've got Vaude panniers but mine haven't got outside pockets! They've got fairly large inner mesh ones though but yes it would be useful to have little pockets somewhere
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
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