Forum home Road cycling forum Road beginners

SPD to SPD-SL transition question?

thejollyboysthejollyboys Posts: 18
edited October 2013 in Road beginners
Hi All,

I'm just setting out on the Road cycling scene having had a mountain bike for the last few years. The advice on here really helped me decide on what to buy, a Trek Domane 4.0. Which is really comfy.

I certainly have the bug and cannot get enough of it.

Two years ago I had spinal surgery to fix a herniated disc, which was causing leg paralysis, cycling has really helped my recoup and helped relax and stretch the back, and get the leg working again.

Enough waffle, my question is. I have been using mountain bike SPD's for a little time but found the surface area a little small on the pedals, so I have just got some SPD-SL 540 pedals, and SIDI genius 5 shoes. both are superb, the shoes are more like slippers.

I have gone for the yellow cleats not really knowing the difference between the different colours. The old SPD cleats did not allow any movement in the pedal when clipped in, the SL's allow the shoe to move about on the pedal, although clipped in. Is this normal? or do it need to adjust something. Also is there an easy way to ensure I have the cleat set in the right place?

thanks.

Andy.

Posts

  • The yellow cleats allow 6 degrees of float. They also come in red which are fixed and blue which have 2 degrees of float. I suspect the movement you feel is due to the float on your yellow cleats.

    I changed from SPD to Look Keos and spent quite a while tweeking cleat positions to find the best for me. Would also be interested to know if there is an easy way to work it out. :)
  • ForumNewbieForumNewbie Posts: 1,664
    I still use SPD MTB pedals on my road bikes. I know what you mean about the small surface area, but I like the easy access as double-sided. I don't like the thought of fiddling about trying to engage with the pedal at a roundabout or a hill start. Be interested to know how easy you find road pedals in these circumstances.
  • You're right they are more tricky at the moment will take some getting used to. clipping in will take some more practice.

    They are more comfy after the first ride than the spd.s.

    We'll see how it goes, still interested on how you get the right fit.
  • I keep SPD on my commuter due to the amount of times I have to stop and junctions, lights and roundabouts, especially in the morning. Maybe once I get better with my Looks I may change but at the moment they are only on my weekend / fair weather bike
  • diamonddogdiamonddog Posts: 3,368
    You're right they are more tricky at the moment will take some getting used to. clipping in will take some more practice.

    They are more comfy after the first ride than the spd.s.

    We'll see how it goes, still interested on how you get the right fit.

    Have a look on here and try a Google search for more info. :)
    http://www.stevehoggbikefitting.com/bik ... -position/
    This one as well, it has a video.
    http://www.globalcyclingnetwork.com/vid ... ss-pedals/
  • I still use SPD MTB pedals on my road bikes. I know what you mean about the small surface area, but I like the easy access as double-sided. I don't like the thought of fiddling about trying to engage with the pedal at a roundabout or a hill start. Be interested to know how easy you find road pedals in these circumstances.

    I use the M545 model for precisely this reason - they look a bit overbuilt, but they give you a larger platform with double-sided entry. With that said, most of the problems people have with SPD, or improvement they experience from switching to a 'road' system, are down to the shoes. Particularly at the lower end, SPD shoes tend not to be as stiff.
  • Daz555Daz555 Posts: 4,040
    I still use SPD MTB pedals on my road bikes. I know what you mean about the small surface area, but I like the easy access as double-sided.
    I think most issues with the small surface area are due to shoe design. With a stiff shoe you can't really feel the contact area.
    You only need two tools: WD40 and Duck Tape.
    If it doesn't move and should, use the WD40.
    If it shouldn't move and does, use the tape.
  • ddraverddraver Posts: 20,379
    Yeah, the road pedals are much harder to get clipped in and much more sensitive to set up - the movement you feel is the float, and you ll get used to it. If you can't stand it then use the red cleats but that would drive me nuts...its a very personal thing to be honest.

    Use a standard method for cleat position to start with then slowly move them around till they feel correct. It might take some time.
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • Which MTB pedals did you have? Most of those have float and usually much more float than SPD-SL. I think mine have something like 7 degrees.
  • dj58dj58 Posts: 2,133
    edited November 2013
    I have recently bought my first road bike after years of riding MTB's with Shimano M737 SPD's, they are still going strong. I decided to stick with MTB SPD's on my road bike for compatibility with my existing shoes and because I can clip in and out without thinking about it. I use the XT M785 Tail Wide SPD Pedals as these offer a larger platform than the standard XT M785, they are also double sided, which is what I am use to. May consider switching to road specific pedals in the future, but for now I'm happy with the XT's.
  • dj58 wrote:
    I have recently bought my first road bike after years of riding MTB's with Shimano M737 SPD's, they are still going strong. I decided to stick with MTB SPD's on my road bike for compatibility with my existing shoes and because I can clip in and out without thinking about it. I use the XT M785 Tail Wide SPD Pedals as these offer a larger platform than the standard XT M785, there are also double sided, which is what I am use to. May consider switching to road specific pedals in the future, but for now I'm happy with the XT's.

    Nothing wrong with using MTB pedals on a road bike. Don't pay attention to the marketing victims; the reason to look into different shoes and/or pedals is discomfort, and even that might be an issue of fit rather than hardware...
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