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Getting a tad nervous..

Rad2474Rad2474 Posts: 162
edited October 2013 in MTB general
Just ordered my first pair of spd pedals,not sure if i'll use them on the trail centres though can't get the thought of doing a face plant with my feet still attached to the bike. I'll probably just use them for when i'm out on the cycle paths etc.

Posts

  • crakercraker Posts: 1,739
    Set them at their loosest setting, you'll be surprised how quickly you'll get the hang of it.
  • 97th choice97th choice Posts: 2,222
    Most of my SPD related training falls happened at 0.01mph.

    You can get multi release cleats and single horizontal release cleats. I've only used the single release but the other version us supposed to be easier to get out, but can possibly release when lifting.
    Too-ra-loo-ra, too-ra-loo-rye, aye

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  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    They come unclipped when you fall off.
  • stubsstubs Posts: 5,001
    Crashed a gazillion times using spuds and only once have I remained clipped in and that was caused by packed in frozen snow.
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  • kajjalkajjal Posts: 3,380
    Most of my SPD related training falls happened at 0.01mph.

    You can get multi release cleats and single horizontal release cleats. I've only used the single release but the other version us supposed to be easier to get out, but can possibly release when lifting.

    I have even done a Del Boy on flats :)
  • Soon get used to them . Most have allen key tension adjust. Set them up loose and it's simple to just flick heels outwards .
  • I started using SPD's when i got the road bike, Said i would never use them on a MTB but i keep thinking of trying them now i have got used to them on the road. Only fallen off once so far at a Junction in front of the beer garden so i gave some peaple a good laugh!
  • p44cmbp44cmb Posts: 124
    They become second nature very quickly. I'm now at the point where i hate riding without them.
  • On the local trails it's SPDs all the way. On red and black runs at trail centres I use flats. Because I'm a big wimp.
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    SPD's for everything.
    I don't understand the fear of wearing them for technical stuff, if anything it's actually easier. Your feet never get bounced out of position on the pedals and they unclip really easily.
    Trying SPD's for downhill was one of the best things I have done. I can pedal places I never could before and never have to worry about foot position.
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    craker wrote:
    Set them at their loosest setting, you'll be surprised how quickly you'll get the hang of it.

    And then, just after you get the hang of it, on the first ride where you feel completely comfortable you'll fall over in front of a load of people :lol:
    Uncompromising extremist
  • Kowalski675Kowalski675 Posts: 4,412
    Never tried 'em, don't want to.
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    They're not difficult to get on with - funnily enough I wouldn't be without them because I don't like the idea of a foot slipping off the pedal
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  • Although I've never tried MTBing when I had my hybrid my feel were forever slipping off the pedals, going over bumps, after shifting gear under load etc, switched to SPD; that problem went away immediately. I can well see the advantage with moutain biking, your feet stay connected to the pedals no matter what kind of terrain you are covering.
  • Kowalski675Kowalski675 Posts: 4,412
    They do that on decent flats too.
  • NorthwindNorthwind Posts: 14,675
    Although I've never tried MTBing when I had my hybrid my feel were forever slipping off the pedals, going over bumps, after shifting gear under load etc, switched to SPD; that problem went away immediately.

    Well... Kinda. Sorta. There's 2 problems there not one. Feet falling off is a really obvious one, but it's really the side effect of the general loss of control- you weren't riding with the bike. With flats, that causes you to fall off. With SPDs, you can't but all those inputs may still be there, which amounts to impaired control and generally giving you and the bike a hard time.

    The techniques that stop your feet falling off the pedals with flats also help you to ride in more control on SPDs- it's all basically the same zen "ride with the bike" stuff that gives best control. Now there's no reason at all that you can't learn all those techniques on SPDs, many riders do. But on flats you really have no choice, whereas on SPDs you do. So, if you stuck on SPDs and thought "that's the problem fixed" and rode on the same, chances are there's still things there you could work on which would make you a better rider but also a more comfortable and in control rider.

    If you do any skills coaching, you hear the same thing over and over, coaches telling their riders to relax, soften their stance, drop their heels, get lower, move around- basically, body english. And tbh just about everyone can be better at this, but SPD riders will generally hear it far more. Simply because their pedals will let them ride without these basics, while flats will kill you to bits.

    I honestly think SPDs are better. I can't use them, my leg's ****ed, and I'm not sure if I would even if it wasn't- I find flats more fun. But SPDs are better, as long as you use them as a tool not a crutch.
    Uncompromising extremist
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