How do I tidy these up? frames and fork?

World\'s Dump
World\'s Dump Posts: 107
edited September 2013 in Road beginners
Dear people,

Wonder if you can help?

The plating on the forks seems to have had it. A colleague gave me some autosol for them. I think I could sort the crown out but has anybody any advice on how to tidy them up? I don't want to "fork out" lots for re-chroming because the end result will only be a mediocre restoration, bearing in mind the quality of the bike.

Similarly I have chemically stripped the frame down as much as I can. Then I have used steel wool/scouring pads to strip it down as much as I can. As it is steel and kept it in the shed and I can't work on it until most weekends, when I get it out to start working on it again, what was shiny(ish) steel looks quite stained. Can anyone advise on how I can do it more consistently?

Many thanks

Comments

  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    A quick google brings up this. I have to admit I was going to get my old project frame sandblasted, but having read this I think I may muck about with some alternatives first!
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    On Strava.{/url}
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    you need to keep the metal away from oxygen and the moisture it holds, so grease the parts you have rubbed down to bare metal, this will prevent re-rusting while you carry on with the next part, then degrease when it comes to painting or re-chroming.

    If you have small scratches through the chrome and want to stop them rusting, but still want them 'shiny' you can spray them (cans) with clear coat which is paint without pigment this will stop it rusting.

    My advice is based in car restoration not bikes :D

    I have clear coated my bare metal windscreen wiper and window latches as it looks better than spray paint and will look OK until I have collected up enough pieces to make a batch of re-chroming more cost effective, you have to remove all the chrome plating anyway so it just preserves the finish.

    latch.jpg
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,541
    if you're aiming for a complete diy job...

    be very careful about using abrasives on the forks, chromium dust is nasty stuff

    tbh i'd get some rust remover to clean up the forks etc., then degrease everything, prime and paint (spray, use lots of light dustings to build up an even finish)

    otherwise, if you are planning on a metal finish, you can try the autosol, it'll leave a bit of wax on the metal, but once that's worn/scratched the bare metal will be very susceptible to corrosion and/or discolouration (i.e. what you are seeing happen at the moment)
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • thanks for the advice, the frame is very patchy with spots of original primer here and there

    so you use general auto grease? thanks
  • Why not just get the whole thing professionally grit blasted, chemical dipped and powder coated?

    There is a 'chrome effect' powder coating colour, it will never look as good but it's better than DIY. Have a google and you can see some pics.

    My local coatings place quoted me about £50 all in frame and forks, including chrome style forks. Haven't had it done yet but from others done in the shop it looks quite promising. It's about £15 for forks only, I would have spent more than that on chemicals, sand paper, paint and lacquer.
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    thanks for the advice, the frame is very patchy with spots of original primer here and there

    so you use general auto grease? thanks

    sand back to bare metal and use any grease as a temporary barrier to the re-rusting while working on it, WD40/auto grease/butter/lard/vaseline/KY jelly etc whatever you have to hand that will be easy to de-grease when you have finished the job :D
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • sooooo much elbow grease though :(

    I'm wondering if my electric sander would work?
  • Why not just get the whole thing professionally grit blasted, chemical dipped and powder coated?

    There is a 'chrome effect' powder coating colour, it will never look as good but it's better than DIY. Have a google and you can see some pics.

    My local coatings place quoted me about £50 all in frame and forks, including chrome style forks. Haven't had it done yet but from others done in the shop it looks quite promising. It's about £15 for forks only, I would have spent more than that on chemicals, sand paper, paint and lacquer.


    Is there a directory professional coaters etc?
  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    yell.com? Worth a try.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    sooooo much elbow grease though :(

    I'm wondering if my electric sander would work?

    Probably better to use it on that table and chairs before a good coat of marine varnish, you do that while the company you find is blasting your frame :D
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,541
    if you are ok to pay for a professional job, get it all shot blasted and powder coated, here's one north, one south...

    http://www.triple-s.co.uk/prices.htm#Bike

    http://www.armourtexltd.co.uk/
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • team47b wrote:
    sooooo much elbow grease though :(

    I'm wondering if my electric sander would work?

    Probably better to use it on that table and chairs before a good coat of marine varnish, you do that while the company you find is blasting your frame :D

    Marine varnish? What's that all about?

    I've greased the frame up with auto grease and it's now in the shed. So I take it I need to degrease with thinners before I sand down any further then once the frame is down to bare metals and rust and paint free, and if I don't get it powder coated I need to prime PDQ otherwise it will rust again :?


  • Thanks for your advice. Money's an issue so I've decided to prime and spray myself. Hoping to build wheels myself. Can anyone suggest a good (free) guide on building wheels and any step by step guides for restoring 10 speeds? Zinn and the art of road bike maintenance might be a bit too modern?

    Thanks