single sided spd pedals

moggy12
moggy12 Posts: 109
edited September 2013 in Commuting chat
hi all looking for some single sided spd pedals for my boardman hybrid bike want single sided has sometimes just pop up to my dads in trainers and yet to buy spd shoes/trainers but most days do a 20mls trip, i like the shimano a520/30 but look very smooth will these be ok with normal trainers in the rain ? or any other recommatations ? thanks

Comments

  • I don't think any road pedals are designed for using with normal shoes, but I know some of my friends do cycle short distances (1-2 miles) with shimano pedals and trainers. This seems to work okay for them, but I doubt any manufacture would design for this or recommend it.
    But if you want pedals which will work with trainers better there are some MTB pedals that have a big platform which would be okay.
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • DrLex
    DrLex Posts: 2,142
    Or the hybrid pedal to match - Shimano M324.
    Location: ciderspace
  • veronese68
    veronese68 Posts: 27,555
    I've got the A530 on one bike and the M324 on my old MTB. The M324 have better grip in trainers.
  • I've used the M324 and am presently using the a530s on both my commuting bikes. Personally I prefer the a530s as they are much easier to clip into (you really don't need to look down as they orient themselves with the clip side towards your foot)

    Both are perfectly fine for cycling with trainers - I have recessed SPD shoes and can happily roll along on the flat for a while if needed. The a530 can be a bit slick but I find are a better compromise than the 324s.

    Oh one thing: if it's important, you can fit pedal reflectors to the m324s
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    I've used the M324 and am presently using the a530s on both my commuting bikes. Personally I prefer the a530s as they are much easier to clip into (you really don't need to look down as they orient themselves with the clip side towards your foot)

    Sticky bearings? The M324s on my Record Ace seem to default to the clip side. I only bought them because it's a classic bike that needs vaguely classic looking cage pedals. I've never actually used the flat side but do think it would be slightly annoying to because the pedal is always upside down for that side!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    are the work of the devil.

    used to love selling them though as I know that was 2 more sets of pedals I would be selling in a few months when they got fed up with them.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • I used a pair of time RSX for a while and I would say it was very slippery with most of my shoes except one trainers which fitted almost like a clip in. I would think it will mainly depend on the shoes you are using but if you got hills around you then clip in is the only way.
    Remember changing bikes and almost coming off going uphill as I thought I clipped in...
  • moggy12
    moggy12 Posts: 109
    thanks guys for info think I get the shimano m324 pedals seem to have more grip on the one side when wearing normal trainers wiggle seem to be the cheapest
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    moggy12 wrote:
    thanks guys for info think I get the shimano m324 pedals seem to have more grip on the one side when wearing normal trainers wiggle seem to be the cheapest
    LOL

    get some shin pads as well.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    nicklouse wrote:
    moggy12 wrote:
    thanks guys for info think I get the shimano m324 pedals seem to have more grip on the one side when wearing normal trainers wiggle seem to be the cheapest
    LOL

    get some shin pads as well.

    I don't think he is going off road :lol:

    Seriously though - another thing that people these days seem to think is a problem when it isn't. Back in the 70s and 80s, we road bikes with flat pedals and no cages at all (those being far too luxurious a bicycle accessory for small boys) and, guess what, we didn't keep bashing our shins up (just as well as shin pads weren't really around either!). People are just sooooo girly these days!
    Faster than a tent.......
  • nicklouse
    nicklouse Posts: 50,675
    no, like i said i used to sell them. and the number of people who bought then for their other bike thinking they were a good idea.

    and yes i remember the 70-80s pedals.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • rubertoe
    rubertoe Posts: 3,994
    I have lovely chunk out of my leg from some 1980's pedals...
    "If you always do what you've always done, you'll always get what you've always got."

    PX Kaffenback 2 = Work Horse
    B-Twin Alur 700 = Sundays and Hills
  • The Rookie
    The Rookie Posts: 27,812
    If you must then just get the double sided pedals with a clip on platform for the short journeys....

    Or ride the SPD with stiff sled trainers, the other day both my cheap wellgo's (temporary while the Ritcheys were rebuilt) failed and I did a 28 mile MTB ride unable to clip in....
    Currently riding a Whyte T130C, X0 drivetrain, Magura Trail brakes converted to mixed wheel size (homebuilt wheels) with 140mm Fox 34 Rhythm and RP23 suspension. 12.2Kg.