Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB beginners

Energy issue

denis06denis06 Posts: 10
edited October 2013 in MTB beginners
I have just bought a MTB in an effort to lose some weight and improver my fitness. After exercising I am tired for days afterwards. I don't want this to deter my efforts to lose weight.
Can anyone give me advice on how the maintain my energy level day after day after exercising?
I am desperate not to lose my enthusiasm.

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Take it slower.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • mcnultycopmcnultycop Posts: 2,143
    Milk after a ride. Eat properly.
  • Protein and a good nights sleep will help but you will always feel tired (to some degree) after exercise. Make sure you drink plenty of water and eat food regulary during the ride as well.
  • Stu CoopsStu Coops Posts: 426
    It's your cardio system that's tired too which will make you feel lifeless, remember the heart is a muscle that has to be worked but also needs rest to recover and get stronger. For weight loss the best way is low intensity which burns fat more efficiently and less likely to cause injury as hard efforts is more for cardio strength.

    Try 1-1.5hr rides every other day at low intensity which for you will mean being out of breath but able to just about chat while riding as this will build your aerobic strength nice and slowly but efficiently and after a few weeks you will see the improvement and speed up naturally, try and time your rides aswell on the same routes and again you will see your times coming down for the same effort.

    Stay away from all the supplements and recovery drinks/food as your trying to lose weight so need to manage your calorie intake, your going to feel tired the day after no matter what you eat or drink as your unfit but the deficit in calories needs to be maintained to burn fat and stick to a balanced healthy diet and you will see the benefit in no time.
    Zesty 514 Scott Scale 20 GT Expert HalfwayupMTB
  • i agree with sue cooper about low intensity

    im also like you trying to loose some weight, i do take a sports drink with me "Iso Energy"
    http://www.hollandandbarrett.com/pages/ ... 67&cid=201

    i do find it helps on 1+ hour rides

    apart from that i have a nice big cold drink of chocolate milk when i get in and then stretch my leg muscles for a few mins

    its not easy trying to lose weight and as yet ive not found a quick way (i wish) but just try to eat a little bit more healthy each week.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,757
    You don't loose weight by intaking more energy.

    You need to learn to use your muscles at the right level so that they don't get excessively fatigued, learning to pedal at the right rate is one key aspect, your pedals should be spinning at circa 80-90rpm, not the 50rpm most people will use naturally, this means they develop more power for the same torque (effort).

    Having good protein will help fill the small muscle tears that develop as you excercise and prevent the aching that they lead to.
    http://www.trails.com/list_6548_deal-mu ... rcise.html
  • POAHPOAH Posts: 3,369
    try doing some high intensity work out as well as basic cycling.

    30s full power then recover do this 5-6 and you'll soon loose some fat and build up stamina.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Or just don't expect to turn into a racing snake overnight.
    If you want to get fit and lose weight quickly, run for results and ride for fun.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • RockmonkeySCRockmonkeySC Posts: 14,770
    I used to be quite large, 17 stone until I decided this year I had enough of being "cuddly".
    Diet is very important if you want the energy to exercise but want to loose weight. Low GI foods like wholemeal pasta are great. If you aren't doing much during the day then eggs for breakfast are good.
    If you want to shift some weight quickly, a short (20-30 minute) run before breakfast is very good but quite tough.
    Stick with it. Its hard to stary but you get the double effect of being lighter and fitter.
    At the end of last year 10 miles was my limit but with three stone gone I can happily go for 40+ mile xc rides and keep up with the group.
  • lg18lg18 Posts: 92
    You might be over-doing it, too much too soon.
    Build up slowly, low intensity as Stu and others have said.
    As you get fitter you'll not only feel less knackered after riding, but also enjoy it a lot more and you'll feel much more energetic generally, so do keep it up!

    Also a good idea to take a day off quite often so your muscles and energy levels can recover, especially after a longer or harder bike ride than normal.

    As others have said, although normal advice might be to intake plenty of calories to reduce fatigue, for you that might mean you defeat the whole point of the exercise, so you'll just have to suffer a bit at the start!

    Good luck,
    Lucy
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    And obviously cutting down on pies, chips and beer helps.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • denis06denis06 Posts: 10
    Thank you all. Great advice. I am 62 years of age so hardly a spring chick! I have decided to start by doing a circuit of the village each day until I get into this. I hope to ride to work one day but will get my wife to bring me home after work so that I'm not doing too much too soon. My diet is very healthy with no snacks in between. Wish me luck. I don't want my new bike to become an ornament.
  • mattshropsmattshrops Posts: 1,134
    As we age recovery time after exercise is also extended. this will be magnified by your lack of bike history.

    As already said - shorter and easier but nice and regular. When you're recovering well, and quickly, start to gradually increase EITHER intensity OR distance. Cycling fitness is a long term project, don't expect too much too soon. Small steps, good luck.
    Death or Glory- Just another Story
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    denis06 wrote:
    Thank you all. Great advice. I am 62 years of age so hardly a spring chick! I have decided to start by doing a circuit of the village each day until I get into this. I hope to ride to work one day but will get my wife to bring me home after work so that I'm not doing too much too soon. My diet is very healthy with no snacks in between. Wish me luck. I don't want my new bike to become an ornament.
    And please hang around - it might stop the kiddies on here giving me a hard time about being old. We could gang up against them.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • It may give you heart to hear of a 53 year old who was in the same boat around 3 months ago . Bit by bit I have extended what I do . 15 mile today mainly cross country and I will go again tomorrow , infact I have got to the stage I miss it if I can't get out . I hadn't cycled since my twenties . 2 inches lost off my waist too !
  • im starting this journey as we speak. cant run for a minute without my heart exploding.
    My wife is a Fel Runner so as above take it slow and easy, my biggest issue at the moment is aching Nads cos of the seat.
    Keep going and your body will adapt, and don't eat censored if you can help it.

    Anyway id better go I want a kebab :P
  • If you're on any prescription meds, check those out. Some blood pressure meds can slow ya down a bit. But aye, take it easy. If you're wrecked for days you are doing too much in my opinion.
  • The Rookie wrote:
    your pedals should be spinning at circa 80-90rpm, not the 50rpm most people will use
    80-90 is very high, especially for someone just starting out. 70 is fine.
    90 is a mental speed for someone just starting out to try and sustain.
  • whyamiherewhyamihere Posts: 7,549
    The right rate to pedal at is the one that feels comfortably. I normally spin at 90-100rpm, but that's something that very few people actually do. Some friends are a lot more comfortable at around 60rpm, and we generally ride at around the same speed for the same distances.
  • It does get easier and the fitter you become the faster you will become. Hang in there, work through the fatigue one step at a time. Stay active on a couple of forums because it keeps the interest going with likeminded people. Before you know it you will be dragged out of bike shops by your missus with you drooling and planning how to spend your kids inheritance on bikes.
  • As already said really.

    Take it easy to start with, the first few weeks are hard until your fitness level increases, then you'll find you can push yourself a bit harder ... you'll still find yourself feeling knackered out and probably feeling rubbish but you will notice the recovery time decreases quickly. soon you'll be knackered and feeling beat after a ride and be fine the next day after a good nights sleep.

    Also your diet is very important. Diet is like cycling is like life. You'll get out of it what you put in to it. Have porridge for breakfast, its a great slow release energy source, hold the sugar/honey/maple syrup. Avoid trail, chocolate, nutrigrain, health bars, etc as they are all full of sugar = bad for loosing weight. If you need a snack, chashew nuts are great, so are home roasted sunflower seeds, cottage cheese is good too (if you have a fridge at work). Have a proper lunch, salad box with brown pasta/rice and tune/chicken is good. Have a proper meal in the evening (no junk/microwave meals, oven ready meals, takeaway, etc), tesco have a cracking range of "shake n bake" meals, you buy your veg and meats, cut it up, whack it in the bag then in the oven and ta-daa! No more deserts!!
    Avoid white food, white pasta/rice, whitebread, white crackers, these are all fast carbs, try and eat brown rice/pasta instead, wholegrain bread, lentils are your friend, they are slow release energy and they go well in curry and chillie and spagbol.
    Have yourself a cheat day once every two weeks where you can have a beer, or wine and some nice stuff like icecream etc, but only for one day, think of it as a reward ... its an incentive to be good the rest of the time.

    Get plenty of sleep! LOTS, when you start exercising your body is going through a massive change and will continue to for as long as you ride or do any kind of proepr exercise, it will need plenty of rest to start with (rest as in sleep not late nights on the sofa :p ) to recover and grow muscle, when your asleep is when your body is repairing itself, it needs a healthy diet to do so efficently. Thres no harm in taking a good multi vitmain & mineral supplement whilst your getting your diet sorted out.

    Dont give up, little and often, keep going back for more, in a couple of months you'll have the stamina to really enjoy being out riding, thats when you'll really start to loose the lbs, then you''l have the missus to worry about, "I never see you anymore since you got the bloody bik...." :D

    Dont take any of that as a negative against you, I've got no idea what your diet or lifestyle is, just a few helpful things that have helped me when I started excercising and loosing weight.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,757
    Sod that, go for ride, enjoy it, drink beer, enjoy it, fall asleep, go to work and dream of cycling, dinner and back to go for ride!
  • Mark909Mark909 Posts: 456
    Don't just ride. Run! It's the best thing I ever did to loose weight and improve my mountain biking fitness.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/c25k/Pages/couch-to-5k-plan.aspx

    http://www.nhs.uk/Tools/Pages/couch-5K-running-plan.aspx?WT.mc_id=101003
  • Mark909 wrote:
    Don't just ride. Run! It's the best thing I ever did to loose weight and improve my mountain biking fitness.

    http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/c25k/Pages/couch-to-5k-plan.aspx

    http://www.nhs.uk/Tools/Pages/couch-5K-running-plan.aspx?WT.mc_id=101003

    i agree, cycling is NOT a good way to increase fitness from a low base, on the contrary you need a certain level of fitness in order to cycle fast/hard enough to start building your fitness.

    walking /jogging and if you insist running is far better at it
  • The Rookie wrote:
    Sod that, go for ride, enjoy it, drink beer, enjoy it, fall asleep, go to work and dream of cycling, dinner and back to go for ride!

    i agree with this as well, some folk here are a touch obsessive
  • FECESFECES Posts: 25
    Tobamory wrote:
    im starting this journey as we speak. cant run for a minute without my heart exploding.
    My wife is a Fel Runner so as above take it slow and easy, my biggest issue at the moment is aching Nads cos of the seat.
    Keep going and your body will adapt, and don't eat censored if you can help it.

    Anyway id better go I want a kebab :P


    Im in my 20s and am a useless runner, always have been. However I am reasonable at cycling. Can hold about 20mph on the road bike on a flat and also like to do mountain biking too. I can typically cycle for about 2.5 hours without eating on route. Running is a completely different game, for me at least.
Sign In or Register to comment.