Skidding

mathematics
mathematics Posts: 453
edited August 2013 in Road beginners
Hi

Advice please.

Just been out first time on my first roadie. It was a bit alien at first and very stiff but I enjoyed it, even clipping in and out - no falls to report....yet!!

My problem was hard braking and Rear wheel skids. What am I doing wrong? Should I just be avoiding hard braking?

Thanks

Chris

Comments

  • diamonddog
    diamonddog Posts: 3,426
    Yes :)
  • chrisaonabike
    chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    Don't brake so hard with the rear brake. If you need to stop quickly, brake a lot harder with the front brake.

    With most of the braking from the front wheel, the CG moves forward so you get more weight on the front wheel, so it's less likely to skid.

    Don't brake so hard you go over the bars. And don't brake hard on corners.

    As you've probably found, a rear wheel skid is often no big deal. A front wheel skid (very difficult in a straight line) is very hard to control.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Mikey41
    Mikey41 Posts: 690
    Don't brake much with the rear, use the front more for hard braking. Road bikes put more of your weight over the front wheel, especially when in the drops, so you can really haul that front brake without it locking up.
    Giant Defy 2 (2012)
    Giant Defy Advanced 2 (2013)
    Giant Revel 1 Ltd (2013)
    Strava
  • Thanks guys

    I'm also thinking my brakes will need a little breaking in too, is that right?
  • thistle_
    thistle_ Posts: 7,141
    You can control a rear wheel skid quite easily, but if you've done it a few times check your tyres are OK.

    I just happened to notice a large bald patch on my tyre a few weeks ago. Either it was serious quality problem with the tyre (unlikely) or it was me locking the rear wheel during an emergency stop the week before.
  • Mikey41
    Mikey41 Posts: 690
    Thanks guys

    I'm also thinking my brakes will need a little breaking in too, is that right?
    If they are brand new, then yes they will get a bit more powerful after a couple of decent rides.
    Giant Defy 2 (2012)
    Giant Defy Advanced 2 (2013)
    Giant Revel 1 Ltd (2013)
    Strava
  • diamonddog
    diamonddog Posts: 3,426
    Try and anticipate your stopping point and then you can apply the brakes gently to avoid skidding. I apply the front brake ever so slightly before the rear and luckily I have yet to have a rear wheel skid.
  • skyd0g
    skyd0g Posts: 2,540
    You should use your FRONT brake to stop. (mostly)
    Read here: http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html
    Cycling weakly
  • rolf_f
    rolf_f Posts: 16,015
    In dry weather, if you are braking to stop, there is no reason to use the rear brake at all because it won't have any effect. There should be that little weight over the back wheel in those conditions that any significant brake force will just lock the rear wheel anyway.

    If the rear brake is helping you slow, then you aren't exerting as much pressure on the front as you can.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • andrewjoseph
    andrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • Mad_Malx
    Mad_Malx Posts: 5,001
    +1 for front brake, but move your weight (arse) back on the saddle while descending.
  • iamcami
    iamcami Posts: 93
    wait, so if the front brake is to stop and we shouldn't use the rear, what's it for? why do they make them? just for slowing speed slightly?
  • andrewjoseph
    andrewjoseph Posts: 2,165
    iamcami wrote:
    wait, so if the front brake is to stop and we shouldn't use the rear, what's it for? why do they make them? just for slowing speed slightly?


    Pretty much, yes. Rear to modulate / control speed, front to slow/stop.
    --
    Burls Ti Tourer for Tarmac, Saracen aluminium full suss for trails
  • kajjal
    kajjal Posts: 3,380
    iamcami wrote:
    wait, so if the front brake is to stop and we shouldn't use the rear, what's it for? why do they make them? just for slowing speed slightly?


    Pretty much, yes. Rear to modulate / control speed, front to slow/stop.

    Coming from a mountain biking background from experience the front brake is the best at stopping you unless you are going round a tight corner or on a loose surface. Even then you can use the front brake to help slow you. As mentioned the rear is more to adjust how you are braking rather than stop the bike.
  • iamcami
    iamcami Posts: 93
    learn something new everyday :)