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Pedals

focuzfocuz Posts: 150
edited August 2013 in Road buying advice
Looking at upgrades over 105 pedals between, Look keo blade or dura ace 9000 pedals or are they not worth the extra price over 105s?

Posts

  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    I can tell the difference between entry level and top of the range pedals, especially in regards to the positivity of engagement. It matters to me as well as the reduced weight.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • 86inch86inch Posts: 161
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
  • johngtijohngti Posts: 2,416
    Grill wrote:
    I can tell the difference between entry level and top of the range pedals, especially in regards to the positivity of engagement. It matters to me as well as the reduced weight.

    What is it that you notice, Grill? I'm not sure I'd be able to tell the difference!
  • Rodders30Rodders30 Posts: 314
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.

    Agree
    Trek 1.5 Road
    Haro MTB
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    johngti wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    I can tell the difference between entry level and top of the range pedals, especially in regards to the positivity of engagement. It matters to me as well as the reduced weight.

    What is it that you notice, Grill? I'm not sure I'd be able to tell the difference!

    The engagement is more positive and the lock is much more secure so no accidental unclipping or slop when pulling. They do take more effort to unclip, but I also that as a plus.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • focuzfocuz Posts: 150
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
    I've never really looked at speedplay pedals at all, just didnt like the look of them, and thought the pedal was too small aha. Whats so good about them then? :)
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    Focuz wrote:
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
    I've never really looked at speedplay pedals at all, just didnt like the look of them, and thought the pedal was too small aha. Whats so good about them then? :)

    They're heavy, over-priced, and made for people who don't know how to dial in a proper cleat adjustment. :P
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • Focuz wrote:
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
    I've never really looked at speedplay pedals at all, just didnt like the look of them, and thought the pedal was too small aha. Whats so good about them then? :)


    Pedal area looks small but the contact area is the cleat not the pedal size - good points -

    Double sided entry
    Totally adjustable free float - dial in as much or as little range of float as you want or need
    Grease them every now and again and the pedal seem to last forever (mine are well over 6k miles and no sign of problems).

    Not so good
    Cleats don't last so long and are around £30 to replace but balance up with pedals and that seems ok to me.
  • Focuz wrote:
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
    I've never really looked at speedplay pedals at all, just didnt like the look of them, and thought the pedal was too small aha. Whats so good about them then? :)


    Pedal area looks small but the contact area is the cleat not the pedal size - good points -

    Double sided entry
    Totally adjustable free float - dial in as much or as little range of float as you want or need
    Grease them every now and again and the pedal seem to last forever (mine are well over 6k miles and no sign of problems).

    Not so good
    Cleats don't last so long and are around £30 to replace but balance up with pedals and that seems ok to me.

    I have found that the Speedplay cleats last a reasonably long time if you don't walk in them. You can buy covers for them as well if you do find you need to walk about on them.
  • 86inch86inch Posts: 161
    Grill wrote:
    Focuz wrote:
    86inch wrote:
    In a word, well 2 words... Speedplay Zero's.
    Best pedals I've ever used. Nuff said.
    I've never really looked at speedplay pedals at all, just didnt like the look of them, and thought the pedal was too small aha. Whats so good about them then? :)

    They're heavy, over-priced, and made for people who don't know how to dial in a proper cleat adjustment. :P

    I've been "dialling in proper cleat adjustment" since i had a pair of Cinelli M71 pedals many, many years ago.... so to say something like that to any user of Speedplays is just ridiculous......

    As others have said the proper float adjustment, positive clipping and stable platform are the real benefits. OK you can't plod up and down gravel drives without getting grit stuck in the cleat, but that's a minor issue resolved by covers.
    To my mind (and i've used alot) they are far superior to all the other systems for racing and pure road riding.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    5 degrees is all most people need and Time, Shimano, and Look can all give you that.
    They're still heavy and overpriced. :P
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    Grill wrote:
    johngti wrote:
    Grill wrote:
    I can tell the difference between entry level and top of the range pedals, especially in regards to the positivity of engagement. It matters to me as well as the reduced weight.

    What is it that you notice, Grill? I'm not sure I'd be able to tell the difference!

    The engagement is more positive and the lock is much more secure so no accidental unclipping or slop when pulling. They do take more effort to unclip, but I also that as a plus.

    Where I agree that a more positive engagement is a big plus. I would think that being more difficult to unclip as a major negative point. I can clip in 99% of the time fine on 105 pedals. the 1% of the time I miss it, it takes me a few extra seconds to get going. So what? When I unclip. I am stopping. Sometimes at lights, or end of a ride. Sometimes though, its unexpectedly cos I get cut up or need to dismount to avoid something. This is more important than saving a few seconds of getting started again. So long as my pedals stay clipped in when I am cycling and unclip when I need to get my foot out sharpish then the rest is trivial.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    I take it you've never accidentally unclipped when caning out of the saddle? Terrible feeling...

    Really the difference in force necessary to unclip is negligible and most pedals have option to set release pressure.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
  • smoggystevesmoggysteve Posts: 2,909
    Grill wrote:
    I take it you've never accidentally unclipped when caning out of the saddle? Terrible feeling...

    Really the difference in force necessary to unclip is negligible and most pedals have option to set release pressure.


    Never happened to me cos I make sure they are set up correctly. I also tend to pull upwards alot when I climb unseated (as opposed to stomping downwards with opposite leg). But are you suggesting the high end pedals to which you refer are particularly hard for unclipping? because thats how you make it sound.
  • GrillGrill Posts: 5,610
    I have a massive amount of asymmetry, so my pedaling force is different than most.

    They do require more effort, but I think it's more of something you get used to and it's not much. I use Time and you can adjust the release tension to 3 positions. Even after 600+ km I didn't feel that they were too difficult to unclip.
    English Cycles V3 | Cervelo P5 | Cervelo T4 | Trek Domane Koppenberg
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