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Cadence/heart rate zones/speed...I'm confused !!

FatBlokeLondonFatBlokeLondon Posts: 14
edited August 2013 in Health, fitness & training
Hi all.
I am quite new to the forum and to cycling, so bear with me.
I posted a "hello" post in the beginner's section here :
viewtopic.php?f=40028&t=12934707
and it was nice to get some great replies.
As a brief summary, I am 53, 19st, had a heart attack and stents fitted 7 years ago.
However, one of the posts suggested I try and keep my cadence up around the 95-100 mark.
95-100? I'm pretty sure that would kill me at the moment. :shock:
So, in order to get fit and lose weight I want to know the best overall "easy build up" method to adopt.
I have read various threads, a lot of which contradict each other. eg. some say try and increase distance over time, some say increase speed over the same distance, both of which would increase the cadence I suppose.
I don't really fully understand the zone heart rate thing, and am finding the whole combination of different things to stick to very confusing.
So, what's the best way to do it?
I have changed my diet too, and eat healthily at the moment.
I just want to go out and ride and have fun doing it, and hopefully get fit/lose weight in the process.

Posts

  • So, what's the best way to do it?
    I have changed my diet too, and eat healthily at the moment.
    I just want to go out and ride and have fun doing it, and hopefully get fit/lose weight in the process.

    Im a newby to road bikes myself but when i took up mountain biking i did exactly what you said just went out and had fun the health benefits and weight loss were a bonus :)
  • schlepcyclingschlepcycling Posts: 1,606
    I just want to go out and ride and have fun doing it, and hopefully get fit/lose weight in the process.
    As you're new this is the first thing to concentrate on, you can worry about training later, just get out ride and have fun.
    'Hello to Jason Isaacs'
  • Mr WillMr Will Posts: 216
    Ignore the numbers and just enjoy the ride. Don't push yourself too hard to begin with but gradually up the effort each time you go out.

    If you really want to analyse then get a Garmin and look at the data once you get home.
    2010 Cannondale CAAD9 Tiagra
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    in order to get fit and lose weight I want to know the best overall "easy build up" method to adopt.
    Just ride, that's all there is to it. Don't overthink things, just enjoy the ride.
  • scarbs85scarbs85 Posts: 170
    I'll echo what the others have said. Just go and ride your bike.

    You might find a GPS app on your phone (Strava/Endomondo) or a Garmin tracker help you stay motivated, as you can see where you've been, how fast and how far you've gone, and with Strava, you can see how your time over certain sections compares to yours (and others) previous runs. But you can look at all that from the comfort of home after you've finished. You will be shocked how quickly you improve just by going out and riding.
  • Even if you don't plan on doing major changes, a short ride every day can really improve your situation without you even noticing.
  • Thanks for all the replies !!
    I am getting out, and I am really enjoying it, which is the main thing.
    I have downloaded Strava to my iPhone, and am going to start using that to map where I've been etc.
    I also have the Wahoo speed and cadence bluetooth sensor, so I can look at my speed etc, although I'm not sure the calories burned display is too accurate, it seems a lot of cals burned in a short time !!
    The reason I ask about cadence is that in a reply to my intro post, some-one said keep cadence at 95-100 RPM.
    I can do 60-65 comfortably, and for most of a ride It stays at around that, but 100 seems ridiculously fast to my unfit legs !!
    I intend to get a Heart-rate monitor too, as when I mentioned starting cycling to my Dr. he thought it might be "interesting" to watch my heart rate!! After a heart attack 7 years ago, I should find it "interesting" too !!
    Anyway, got to go, as I am going out on my bike in a while!!
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    Ignore the cadence advice. It's moronic in the extreme. Seriously, just... Just,
    That guy who said that needs a slap.
  • Ignore the cadence advice. It's moronic in the extreme. Seriously, just... Just,
    That guy who said that needs a slap.

    Sounds like sound advice to me !!
    Thanks.
    I can't remember who said that, but it's in my intro post linked to in my first post in this thread. :twisted:
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    I know who it is. Probably best not comment on him any further.
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    By the way, this doesn't change my advice to just ride, and ignore your cadence, but here's what sheldonbrown (basically the cycling gospel) has to say about it..
    Cadence The speed at which the pedals turn, measured in Revolutions Per Minute. Inexperienced cyclists tend to ride in higher gears than they should, pedaling at a slower cadence.
    Most experienced cyclists pedal at cadences in the range of 70-90 RPM. This puts less strain on the joints, particularly the knees. Racing cyclists often use even higher cadences for bursts of acceleration.
  • By the way, this doesn't change my advice to just ride, and ignore your cadence, but here's what sheldonbrown (basically the cycling gospel) has to say about it..
    Cadence The speed at which the pedals turn, measured in Revolutions Per Minute. Inexperienced cyclists tend to ride in higher gears than they should, pedaling at a slower cadence.
    Most experienced cyclists pedal at cadences in the range of 70-90 RPM. This puts less strain on the joints, particularly the knees. Racing cyclists often use even higher cadences for bursts of acceleration.

    Just ride and enjoy sounds good to me !
  • scarbs85scarbs85 Posts: 170
    By the way, this doesn't change my advice to just ride, and ignore your cadence, but here's what sheldonbrown (basically the cycling gospel) has to say about it..
    Cadence The speed at which the pedals turn, measured in Revolutions Per Minute. Inexperienced cyclists tend to ride in higher gears than they should, pedaling at a slower cadence.
    Most experienced cyclists pedal at cadences in the range of 70-90 RPM. This puts less strain on the joints, particularly the knees. Racing cyclists often use even higher cadences for bursts of acceleration.

    Interesting that, thanks Yeehaa.
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