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Where can a Cyclist ride

andrepepeandrepepe Posts: 35
edited July 2013 in Commuting general
Hello,

I'm from Portugal, where the laws about cycling are a bit more explained (or at least understandable).

My main question is, where can I ride a bike here? I've listened a few opinions and read a few laws... but I still with the same question! There is a easy way to learn it.

For example.
- Motorways are logical - NO
- A (something) Roads? 2 lanes on each way (Like A338 in Bournemouth) - It's not clear if I can ride or not, I know it's not recommended for security questions, but it's legal?
- Somewhere on Highway Code say's MUST NOT ride on pavement? - Meaning of pavement it's Road... So where can we ride?

Anyone can help me with this question?

Thanks
Actual ride: Kona Satori 2012
Custom Kona Dew Plus 2008

Previous rides:
- Giant Rapid One (Broken in a accident)
- Scott Genius MC40 (Stolen)
- Orange Sub-Five (Broke the frame)
- Orange G3 (Sold)
- Orange Crush (Sold)

Posts

  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    andrepepe wrote:
    - A (something) Roads? 2 lanes on each way (Like A338 in Bournemouth) - It's not clear if I can ride or not, I know it's not recommended for security questions, but it's legal?

    Yes; it's legal. (Exception is if there are specific signs to say it's not allowed, this is rare)
    - Somewhere on Highway Code say's MUST NOT ride on pavement? - Meaning of pavement it's Road... So where can we ride?

    The pavement is actually the footway, for pedestrians at the side of the road. It's not legal to ride there. However quite often bicycles are allowed to ride here, however if this is the case there will be regular signs like this:shared_use_path-2.gif

    In general bicycles are allowed everywhere cars are allowed with the exception of motorways.

    There are often off road cycle tracks too.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    andrepepe wrote:
    - Meaning of pavement it's Road
    not in the UK.

    in the UK the Pavement is as above the raised area to the side of the road for pedestrians.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • andrepepeandrepepe Posts: 35
    markhewitt1978, thank you for your explanation!

    nicklouse, I apologize for my misunderstood.

    It help a lot, specially because I'm planing my rides at home via Garmin and I don't wanna ride on Not Allowed roads!

    Another quick question, we need to ride always on the Bike lane when exist? I'm asking that because with a road bike sometimes it's danger to ride on them, specially for the tires. I will be fined if I'm not riding the bike lane for example when is not dangerous to ride on the road?

    Thanks
    Actual ride: Kona Satori 2012
    Custom Kona Dew Plus 2008

    Previous rides:
    - Giant Rapid One (Broken in a accident)
    - Scott Genius MC40 (Stolen)
    - Orange Sub-Five (Broke the frame)
    - Orange G3 (Sold)
    - Orange Crush (Sold)
  • BigLightsBigLights Posts: 464
    Nope, bike lanes are NOT compulsory to ride in, as I understand it. You'll see from other threads in this forum that there are plenty of people who choose to ride on the road as it is sometimes much safer/faster to do so. Unfortunately the bike lanes in the UK are not always well thought out.
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    andrepepe wrote:
    Another quick question, we need to ride always on the Bike lane when exist? I'm asking that because with a road bike sometimes it's danger to ride on them, specially for the tires. I will be fined if I'm not riding the bike lane for example when is not dangerous to ride on the road?

    No; there is no law requiring you to ride in the bike lane. Just be aware that some drivers think there is!
  • andrepepeandrepepe Posts: 35
    Ok, Thanks a lot for your help!!

    Have great and safe rides!
    Actual ride: Kona Satori 2012
    Custom Kona Dew Plus 2008

    Previous rides:
    - Giant Rapid One (Broken in a accident)
    - Scott Genius MC40 (Stolen)
    - Orange Sub-Five (Broke the frame)
    - Orange G3 (Sold)
    - Orange Crush (Sold)
  • wandsworthwandsworth Posts: 354
    Be careful on some A-roads. As I think you recognise in your post, although legal some are very dangerous for bikes.

    viewtopic.php?f=40052&t=12929615

    Enjoy your trip!
    Shut up, knees!

    Various Boardmans, a Focus, a Cannondale and an ancient Trek.
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    In England and Wales it's road except for Motorways. You can also ride on designated cycleways and bridleways. In Scotland you can ride anywhere within reason under the relatively new Right to Roam laws. So north of the border a public footpath is fair game but south of the border it's not, unless you are under 16. iirc the the Forests, Parkland and National Parks in England and Wales may have local bylaws allowing cycling on footpaths. At Forestry Trail Centres free riding is usually allowed but Down Hill parks often need permission as they won't let novices on with inadequate gear.

    Basically our laws around cycling could be clearer!
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    You can also ride on any footpath maintained by the local authority UNLESS they are either the pavement by the side of the road or a byelaw has been passed excluding bikes......they are rare but one cuts 1/4 mile off my commute!
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    The Rookie wrote:
    You can also ride on any footpath maintained by the local authority UNLESS they are either the pavement by the side of the road or a byelaw has been passed excluding bikes......they are rare but one cuts 1/4 mile off my commute!

    Do you have a reference for this? Would it be just parks or does it include rural Public Footpaths?

    How do you tell which is which and do Ride with GPS and Cyclestreets take them in to account?

    Laws as clear as late Autumn trail mud.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    No referance as the law prohibiting cycles is specifically for the footpaths at the side of the road, so alleyways and other footpaths are legal unless otherwise excluded. Most parks have an exclusion for example.

    Most councils have an availability of maps for land owned by them or the highways dept, I got the maps for my area and checked!
  • CanalRiderCanalRider Posts: 194
    A road has been held in the case of Worth v Brooks [1959] Crim LR 885 include pavements and boundary grass verges.
    --
    Saw a sign on a restaurant that said Breakfast, any time -- so I ordered French Toast in the Renaissance.
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    The Rookie wrote:
    No referance as the law prohibiting cycles is specifically for the footpaths at the side of the road, so alleyways and other footpaths are legal unless otherwise excluded. Most parks have an exclusion for example.

    A footpath at the side of the road is a "footway" legally speaking.
    I didn't think off road footpaths did allow cycling?

    Luckily near me most parks allow cycling; but I can see an argument for not doing so.
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