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i need more gears - how?

kalioonkalioon Posts: 59
edited July 2013 in MTB workshop & tech
im finding that the fitter i get the less im using the lower gears. in fact i cant remember the last time i came off the wee ring. more importantly im also finding that the highest gear isnt "powerful" enough. so how do i get more high gears? do i have to relace the whole shebang: chain, chain rings, and stuff. or is there somthing i can tweek?

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    kalioon wrote:
    im finding that the fitter i get the less im using the lower gears. in fact i cant remember the last time i came off the wee ring. more importantly im also finding that the highest gear isnt "powerful" enough. so how do i get more high gears? do i have to relace the whole shebang: chain, chain rings, and stuff. or is there somthing i can tweek?
    well for a start you could give us a clue as to what you are running now.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • kalioonkalioon Posts: 59
    3x8? ive got 3 front rings, and 8 on the back. yeah, not exactly clued up on gears
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    kalioon wrote:
    3x8? ive got 3 front rings, and 8 on the back. yeah, not exactly clued up on gears
    and? sizes?

    22-32-42 or?
    34-12 or?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • kalioonkalioon Posts: 59
    more info? wtf? lol sorry, i know nothing of gears. here is the spec direct from the manufactuer

    Shimano Altus SL Rapidfire trigger shifters, Shimano Altus front and rear derailleurs, SR Suntour XCT chainset, 42/32/22 tooth chainrings, Shimano 11-34 tooth cassette, 8-speed
  • markhewitt1978markhewitt1978 Posts: 7,614
    Your highest gear is 42/11. - It's simple to work out the difference between them just divide 42 by 11 and that'll give you a number, the higher the number the higher or harder the gear.

    Since 11 is the smallest you can have on the back, then you'd need a bigger front chainring, which might be difficult to do depending on the bike.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 50,675 Lives Here
    kalioon wrote:
    more info? wtf? lol sorry, i know nothing of gears. here is the spec direct from the manufactuer

    Shimano Altus SL Rapidfire trigger shifters, Shimano Altus front and rear derailleurs, SR Suntour XCT chainset, 42/32/22 tooth chainrings, Shimano 11-34 tooth cassette, 8-speed
    thank you.

    you are limited to increaseing the size of the big ring to a 44 tooth one. or you could get some touring cranks and use thier 28-38-48 rings and a new front mech. Or buy a road bike.


    but again you should be able to do a cadence of about 120 which would give you a spead of over 40mph.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,804
    You'd be better off learning to pedal rather than changing stuff you don't need, I doubt your pulling 40mph all that often!
    Current steed - Whyte T129, 2013 frame, mongrel Revelations, Giant dropper, Stans S1 wheelset. 12, Magura Trail Sport brakes, 1x11. 12.8Kg
  • MindermastMindermast Posts: 124
    A 44 teeth chainring would give you as much (or little) as 5% more speed. If you want to go real fast, you should get a racing bike, where you could have 53/11 - 21%, a bit more, because racing bike wheels have a slightly larger circumference.

    Apart from that: You could tweak your cassette. I think, a typical cassette with 7 sprockets (I know, you have 8) has something like 11 13 15 18 21 24 28. If you don't need the low gears, you could go for 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 or even 11 12 13 14 15 17 19 21. This will give you more gears to fine-tune at higher speeds, and trouble with steep ascents. This won't increase your top speed but it will allow you to maintain a high speed more easily.
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    Hmm, I'm dubious. I've not seen a recent bike with an 8-speed cassette/freehub, only freewheels - and that means they won't have an 11T sprocket.

    Other than that though, where are you riding, and what speed are you pedalling? If you do have a 42T chainring, and an 11T sprocket, you should be able to get plenty of speed, like Nick says. Pedal faster.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    I've never seen an 8 speed with a freewheel. 7 downwards yes.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • YeehaaMcgeeYeehaaMcgee Posts: 5,740
    Hmm, you may be right, but I'm moderately certain that the lower end bikes a few of the riders have round here, are 8 speed freewheels.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    Hmm, you are right, but I'm moderately certain that I am dazed and confused.
    Sounds about right.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,804
    Hmm, you may be right, but I'm moderately certain that the lower end bikes a few of the riders have round here, are 8 speed freewheels.
    Should have gone to specsavers.........
    Current steed - Whyte T129, 2013 frame, mongrel Revelations, Giant dropper, Stans S1 wheelset. 12, Magura Trail Sport brakes, 1x11. 12.8Kg
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