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New seatpost - do I need offset?

Weeman1973Weeman1973 Posts: 471
edited June 2013 in Road buying advice
I'm in the market for a new seatpost and am looking at full carbon (not necessarily for weight saving but for comfort) and am drawn to the Pro Vibe version.

My question is that all the top end seatposts seem to come with an offset, but I was wondering if I need that and what the benefits are? I currently ride a Bontrager (knock off from fleabay!) XXX one bolt design which has 20mm of offset, but I always feel like I am too far forward and try and shuffle back onto the meat of the saddle rather than the nose. Would an inline post help this by shifting the saddle forward or am I barking up the wrong tree altogether?

Posts

  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    You need to work out how to fit yoursefl to your bike. Only then will you know whether you need a seat post with offset or not.
  • ChrisrebbeckChrisrebbeck Posts: 133
    Providing your pedal axle aligns with the ball of your foot, you then need to sit on your bike with your hands on the hoods in your riding position. Drop a plumb line from just under your knee cap and this should be inline with your pedal axle. Dependent on where this falls you may or may not need setback.For me (i must have long lower leg but short femurs!) I need no set back at all.
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    Providing your pedal axle aligns with the ball of your foot, you then need to sit on your bike with your hands on the hoods in your riding position. Drop a plumb line from just under your knee cap and this should be inline with your pedal axle. Dependent on where this falls you may or may not need setback.For me (i must have long lower leg but short femurs!) I need no set back at all.

    Ignore this advice, it's nonsense.
  • styxd wrote:
    Providing your pedal axle aligns with the ball of your foot, you then need to sit on your bike with your hands on the hoods in your riding position. Drop a plumb line from just under your knee cap and this should be inline with your pedal axle. Dependent on where this falls you may or may not need setback.For me (i must have long lower leg but short femurs!) I need no set back at all.

    Ignore this advice, it's nonsense.

    interesting comment - what would you suggest as an alteranitve to KOPS ? (PS genuine question I've seen a few crticise KOPS but not many have a credible alternative with rationale [not to say there is that great a rationale for KOPS though!])
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    styxd wrote:
    Providing your pedal axle aligns with the ball of your foot, you then need to sit on your bike with your hands on the hoods in your riding position. Drop a plumb line from just under your knee cap and this should be inline with your pedal axle. Dependent on where this falls you may or may not need setback.For me (i must have long lower leg but short femurs!) I need no set back at all.

    Ignore this advice, it's nonsense.

    interesting comment - what would you suggest as an alteranitve to KOPS ? (PS genuine question I've seen a few crticise KOPS but not many have a credible alternative with rationale [not to say there is that great a rationale for KOPS though!])

    Spend some time reading credible articles on bike fit. Spend some time experimenting making different adjustments to the position of the contact points on your bike.

    Although there are clearly plenty of people out there who are just happy to use the KOPS rule and be done with it. These are probably the same people who still ride the bike exactly as it came out of the shop, and moan when they get pains after riding for more than half an hour.
  • on-yer-bikeon-yer-bike Posts: 2,974
    styxd wrote:
    Providing your pedal axle aligns with the ball of your foot, you then need to sit on your bike with your hands on the hoods in your riding position. Drop a plumb line from just under your knee cap and this should be inline with your pedal axle. Dependent on where this falls you may or may not need setback.For me (i must have long lower leg but short femurs!) I need no set back at all.

    Ignore this advice, it's nonsense.

    interesting comment - what would you suggest as an alteranitve to KOPS ? (PS genuine question I've seen a few crticise KOPS but not many have a credible alternative with rationale [not to say there is that great a rationale for KOPS though!])
    Yes what is the alternative as a starting point? Ive had a Retul fit and the fitter used KOPS. In what instances would you deviate from KOPS? Anyway, if you believe in KOPS then seatpost set back must be dependent on on the length of your upper leg.
    Pegoretti
    Colnago
    Cervelo
    Campagnolo
  • styxdstyxd Posts: 3,234
    if you believe in KOPS then seatpost set back must be dependent on on the length of your upper leg.

    Which is daft if you think about it.
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