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Losing My Cycling Mojo?

aberdeenalaberdeenal Posts: 200
edited May 2013 in Road beginners
Hello,

I'm relatively new to the forum and also to cycling (approx. 11 x months). I usually commute a couple of days a week and try to get out 2 weekends out of 4 but recently I haven't been enjoying my commute due to feeling scared / un-easy and my confidence on the bike has completely gone :(

It took me a long time to pluck up the courage to buy a set of SPD-SL's and still unclip a ridiculous distance away from junctions, traffic lights etc. and now seriously thinking of going back to the pedals that were on the bike when I bought it :oops:

Anyone gone through similar feelings or can offer some advice apart from "grow a pair"!?!?

Cheers,

Al

Posts

  • mcdilbertmcdilbert Posts: 8
    Don't go back to the old pedals!

    You'll get it eventually and there's nothing wrong with unclipping a distance from the stop!

    I was so used to the double sided pedals that y'get on mountain bikes that I ditched the SPD-SL's and went for speedplay zeros. So I've been there! Felt your pain. Came out the other side.

    Best advice is to go and practice somewhere flat and quiet. Ride along and spend the whole time clipping/unclipping.

    Practice setting off and practice getting out quickly.

    Also, to be honest, falling over while clipped in seems to be a right of passage. I don't know ANYONE that hasn't keeled over at some point in the early days.

    Take it easy (but don't give up!).

    Colin
  • meursaultmeursault Posts: 1,433
    mcdilbert wrote:
    Don't go back to the old pedals!

    You'll get it eventually and there's nothing wrong with unclipping a distance from the stop!

    I was so used to the double sided pedals that y'get on mountain bikes that I ditched the SPD-SL's and went for speedplay zeros. So I've been there! Felt your pain. Came out the other side.

    Best advice is to go and practice somewhere flat and quiet. Ride along and spend the whole time clipping/unclipping.

    Practice setting off and practice getting out quickly.

    Also, to be honest, falling over while clipped in seems to be a right of passage. I don't know ANYONE that hasn't keeled over at some point in the early days.

    Take it easy (but don't give up!).

    Colin

    Nice post +1. Came here to post similar
    Superstition sets the whole world in flames; philosophy quenches them.

    Voltaire
  • WindyGWindyG Posts: 1,099
    I have just gone from SPD-SL to normal MTB SPD's as I couldn't get used to them, it effected my confidence and I was too distracted having to think about unclipping and couldn't clip back in very slick I was just fumbling around, however with normal SPD's it is 2nd nature making my rides more enjoyable and feel so much safer.
  • marylogicmarylogic Posts: 355
    If it's actually stopping you going out on your bike then change back to non clipless pedals for a bit.

    I did this for a while last year - I realised I was going out on my hybrid rather than my road bike because I wasn't happy with the clipless. I changed for a while then when the time was right I changed back. Most important thing is to enjoy your cycling IMHO
  • aberdeenalaberdeenal Posts: 200
    Thanks for all the replies - good(!?!?) to see that I'm not the only one that's had this issue.......cheers :-)
  • PituophisPituophis Posts: 1,025
    I had the same problem back in my mtb days, and hated my Time clip in pedals so much that I went back to flats. :oops:

    After watching my mate struggle at every set of lights to get into his spd sl's I thought I'd try the mtb style spd's first on my road bike, until I got the hang of things. I actually found these a doddle, and haven't taken them off yet :wink:
    I think you just need to find a type of pedal that suits you best, and don't worry about what anyone else thinks!
  • alihisgreatalihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    Its becomes second nature after a while.. just a muscle memory that needs to be developed.

    The fact you're so nervous probably suggests your fit on the bike is wrong so you're not well balanced in the first place?
  • TommyB61TommyB61 Posts: 103
    edited May 2013
    I also lost my mojo after starting out on clipless pedals...fell off twice in 2 days, which didn't help my confidence one bit :oops: I only rode my hybrid (with flat pedals) for a good while after that.

    As has been said above, muscle memory is key. Once I decided to try the clipless again, I spent an hour or so sat on my road bike whilst leaning against a wall just practising clipping in / out & deciding which would be my 'leading' foot for unclipping. It really helped me to get comfortable with the feel of the pedals, & to plan how to unclip easily when I need to.

    I now have spd pedals on both my road & hybrid, & wouldn't go back to flats. Keep the faith, Al, you'll get there.
  • chrisaonabikechrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
    Don't know if this works with SPD-SLs but it's saved my bacon a few times with my SPDs:

    Keep the pedal tension set to the absolute minimum required to stay clipped in. Then I find that a good yank (ie in a panic as the bike starts to fall :) ) will unclip even without twisting.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • morstarmorstar Posts: 5,055
    http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/pedals/product/review-shimano-m647-dx-clipless-pedal-14726

    These are what you need. An spd pedal that you can still use not clipped in. I use normal spd on my commuter bike as it's just better for the stop start bits and having shoes you can walk in easily. Sl's on the roadie.
  • RiderUkRiderUk Posts: 71
    AberdeenAl
    I moved to SPD SL Pedals earlier in the month and found the transition easier than expected.
    Yes, I did end up in a heap on the floor on day 2,having been advised that it will happen.
    4 weeks later I have no problems and feel at total ease with them.
    Give it more time and practice. Decide which foot stay’s connected and which foot you unclip.
    For me I unclip the left foot.
    My LBS set the pedal release tension to minimum.
    Good luck.
  • aberdeenalaberdeenal Posts: 200
    My SPD-SL's are set to the minimum and I've practiced quite a bit with my bike in my turbo trainer. I feel fine on that but just panic when out on the road - hopefully it'll come and I'll relax a bit more.

    Need to look at getting a proper bike fit on my bike - that may help too.

    Thanks again for the replies - very much appreciated :-)
  • SodafarlSodafarl Posts: 118
    Hi just fitted my pedals for the first time today found it really weird and fell off twice. Have been getting grief from the family to change back but a bit of a stubborn git so they are staying where they are and hopefully will become second nature as everyone says.
  • Drop the commute for a while and get out into the hinterland; can't believe you can lose the mojo when you have royal deeside, lecht, cabrach, cairn o'mount etc on the doorstep. Some great routes and superb climbs, used to live up that way...
  • marylogicmarylogic Posts: 355
    Good point there.

    I took my SPD-SLs off when I was doing a lot of short rides around town. I put them back on when I started doing longer rides again

    The answer is obviously to buy a new bike for commuting with regular pedals and keep the clipless on your road bike. :D
  • monkimarkmonkimark Posts: 937
    Mountain bike spds are easier to clip in (double sided pedals, plus the tread seems to guide the cleat and pedal together) plus easier to clip out of because they unclip by twisting, tilting or moving your foot sideways - spring tension seems to be lighter too but that may just be because my pedals are a bit old.
    The cleats don't wear out either which probably helpskeep things consistent.

    I switched SPD-SL to SPD for commuting recently and much prefer it.
  • With 2 road bikes i stick to SPDs all the time, i thought initially that i wouldn't feel like a proper roadie but am now noticing a lot of guys on far better bikes than me are on the same pedals. The practicality of being able to walk as opposed to hobble when off the bike and to not think about slipping when carrying the bacon butty and americano is an advantage. :D
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