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Suggestion for running ruined forks?

MTB noobMTB noob Posts: 272
edited May 2013 in MTB workshop & tech
A catch 22 problem right here.

I've got a set of SR Suntour 140mm coil LOD forks (weighing 6lbs on an XC bike) that I bought off of my friend for £35 because the seals were shot.

The reason for this is because the air cartridge had a leak in my original Raidons which I have been waiting from Halfords to get the RIGHT ONES for over two months (which is becoming really tedious)

The thing is they randomly lock up (usually when they touch any water) but this one was unusual because they locked up just before a corner which had a 1 in 4 angle on it at around 20mph (I checked Strava for the speed) on a rock garden on a dry day.

Now I have a huge graze wound that covers half my knee cap and a bit of my right wrist.

My question is how can I keep them running smooth and not suffering from catastrophic stiction for a few hours as I need them sorted by Saturday?
My god road cycling is scary! I'm going to keep my relaxing rides to the trails where everything is green, fast and less crazy.

Posts

  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    You can't. If the seals are shot, then the bushing probably are too, and they will bind when loaded. And are subject to filling with censored again.

    What model Suntour? LOD is the cartridge.
  • MTB noobMTB noob Posts: 272
    The ones I'm running are currently 2009 Raidon 140 LOD coil from an old Carrera Banshee.

    They're alright for doing a bit of jumping as they deal with a large load but the issue is the technical trails and general use. It may also be helpful to you that the sag on them is 5-10% before and after I've bounced up and down on them.
    My god road cycling is scary! I'm going to keep my relaxing rides to the trails where everything is green, fast and less crazy.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    They sound knakcered - no way you can say if will work ok!

    A full strip and service is needed, and replacment of seals and probably bushings.
  • MTB noobMTB noob Posts: 272
    So i'm better off nagging at Halfords for my replacement forks then? It sounds like a lengthy and costly process either way.
    My god road cycling is scary! I'm going to keep my relaxing rides to the trails where everything is green, fast and less crazy.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Are the Halfords forks a replacment for faulty goods, or are you paying for a new bit?
  • MTB noobMTB noob Posts: 272
    They're being replaced under warranty because they were faulty - i'm not paying for it but it would be kind of them to keep their word with the "A new set will be with you within 6 weeks". It's been over 8 weeks now.
    My god road cycling is scary! I'm going to keep my relaxing rides to the trails where everything is green, fast and less crazy.
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    2 weeks is bad, never mind 6! They havea duty to sort this out in reasonable time or compensate you, or offer a refund. Threaten them with trading standards.
  • MTB noobMTB noob Posts: 272
    I'll look up on it - it definitely didn't seem right for it to take this long.
    My god road cycling is scary! I'm going to keep my relaxing rides to the trails where everything is green, fast and less crazy.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,747
    Probably worth dropping the lowers off the suntours, cleaning up and adding a large dollop of red rubber grease to the bushings, it's the stickiest grease going and may well keep them going long enough, as an indiaction people use them to relube Subaru Impreza STi struts after they start to stick (stnd grease is pants and it's a common fault) kept my Scooby going for 3 more years that way, if it will cope with 1.4 tonnes of car, will work on an MTB!
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