Garmin edge 810....510 whats the difference

sigorman85
sigorman85 Posts: 2,536
edited April 2013 in Road general
As above whats the differnce between the 2 other than the 810 is bigger
When i die I just hope the wife doesn't sell my stuff for what I told her I paid for it other wise someone will be getting a mega deal!!!


De rosa superking 888 di2

Comments

  • sharky1029
    sharky1029 Posts: 188
    The 810 can use OS mapping whereas the 510 can only do a sugar trail and is not advertised as a navigational aid however if it probably can read trough a tcx cue sheet to give turn by turn directions in the same way a 500 can.
    If you don't want the OS navigation or smartphone connectivity, you may as well get the 500 as the battery life is so much better and cheaper.
  • danlikesbikes
    danlikesbikes Posts: 3,898
    This should help - https://buy.garmin.com/en-GB/GB/catalog ... uct=112885

    Gives you what you get in each, mainly on the 810 you get more but for things like battery life the 510 is slightly better as you would expect with a smaller screen and less functions to be run.
    Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.
  • TheSmithers
    TheSmithers Posts: 291
    If the 810's navigational capabilities are anything like the 800, it will f**k you over every time you try to use it. If reliable navigation it what you're after, stick to the 510 and use traditional maps. Sorry for going off topic. Not a happy Garmin 800 owner here.
  • sigorman85
    sigorman85 Posts: 2,536
    Can the 510 connect to my smart phone?
    Also if i record a route can i save it and do the same route .ie as a save course for future training ?
    When i die I just hope the wife doesn't sell my stuff for what I told her I paid for it other wise someone will be getting a mega deal!!!


    De rosa superking 888 di2
  • sharky1029
    sharky1029 Posts: 188
    Yes, both the 810 and 510 can connect to your smart phone for instant upload so people can stalk you on your ride and you can load a course from a previous work out but the 510 (and 500) will only give you directions if you upload a cue sheet with each turn on it through a tcx file, the 810 will work out the directions from the gpx file.
    However, on a long ride, most smartphones will die after 3-4 hours of bluetoothing while uploading on 3G (which you will end up losing signal for and giving your stalkers a jerky image of where you are.
  • snipsnap
    snipsnap Posts: 259
    I'm struggling trying to work out what the benefits are with the new features, and I have been after a garmin unit for a while, but I have to admit to thinking that its all a bit unnecessary.

    What I mean is, I ave endomondo app on my smartphone. That allows other endomondo users to track my ride as I do it. When I get home from a ride, that ride is sync'd wirelessly to the endomondo account, where I can then upload also to strava albeit manually by transferring files on a laptop. I would also need to do this with a garmin unit I believe as it would sync with garmin connect, but I'd need to intervene to share that data with strava or endomondo. Is this correct?

    The reason I was looking at garmin units is because my phone can sometimes take an age to connect to GPS, which can mean ride segments are missed and therefore the rest of the ride data is skewed as a result. I find this very frustrating. From what I've read however, there are similar issues with the garmin units? So that problem still exists.

    In addition, I'm unable to see any ride data as I go, as its on my smartphone in my back pocket. This would be incredibly useful to have then I have an awareness of speed / time / distance but effectively a cateye strada unit could provide all this at a fraction of the cost. I could even splurge on the cadence version of that unit at a fraction of the price.

    So........convince me here people, what is the benefit of these units and why do I still want one after all that I've stated above? :wink:
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,385
    The biggest thing for me was the mapping functionality (don't agree with the above) and the fact that the battery lasts till the end of the ride. When I moved to NL, being able to find a route on the web and follow it made it much easier to find good routes and see a bit of the "country side"

    Why one would have a 510 I don't know...unless you have a powermeter too
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • farrina
    farrina Posts: 360
    sigorman85 wrote:
    As above whats the differnce between the 2 other than the 810 is bigger

    http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2013/01/garm ... eview.html

    And

    http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2013/01/garm ... eview.html

    I believe there is a comparison table at the end of the reviews which are the most comprehensive I have seen on the web

    Regards

    Alan
    Regards
    Alan
  • Gizmodo
    Gizmodo Posts: 1,928
    @snipsnap - non-GPS cycle computer + mobile phone app vs. Garmin 800

    You are on a 5 hour ride when, 30 miles from home you have a catastrophic failure and you have to phone for a taxi, only you have no phone battery because after 5 hours of recording the route it's dead.

    You are 50 miles from home and you get lost, so you stop and pull up Google maps - but there's no mobiles phone coverage so no data connection, so no maps. You ride for a bit and get a signal, phew - only now you have to stop every few miles to look at the maps to get back on track. That's when your phone runs out of battery.

    You're planning a cycling holiday and have used the Internet to discover some great routes that you want to follow. That means having maps or directions on your bars - exactly what the Edge 800/810 is designed for.
  • Mikey23
    Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    IMHO many people who winge about garmins have not fully worked out how to use them properly. There is plenty of info out there. I don't need navigation stuff so I have a 500 on my bars doing what it does best, and a phone in my back pocket, ready to do what it does best ie phone people.
  • snipsnap
    snipsnap Posts: 259
    @gizmodo - yeah I get what you're saying here, and I appreciate that he top end 810 unit isn't aimed at everyday riders ploughing the same regular routes, but even with the 510, if I had the Bluetooth and data switched on on my smartphone then this would surely drain the battery just as much as my endomondo app.

    So I'm not actually achieving anything really.

    this is just my understanding of the functionality so I know I could be well off the mark.

    Just trying to work out what kit would be most useful to me, and for a change, the cheap and cheerful option seems to make more sense to me!
  • goonz
    goonz Posts: 3,106
    Whats the difference?

    About £200 right?
    Scott Speedster S20 Roadie for Speed
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    n+1 is well and truly on track
    Strava http://app.strava.com/athletes/1608875
  • Gizmodo
    Gizmodo Posts: 1,928
    snipsnap wrote:
    @gizmodo - yeah I get what you're saying here, and I appreciate that he top end 810 unit isn't aimed at everyday riders ploughing the same regular routes, but even with the 510, if I had the Bluetooth and data switched on on my smartphone then this would surely drain the battery just as much as my endomondo app.
    I haven't done any testing or research, but I assume (and it is only an assumption) that Bluetooth to the phone and a bit of data across the mobile network is going to use less battery than recording GPS. If someone with experience of this can correct or confirm please.

    The alternative is to buy the 500/800 which don't use the phone at all, but you will need to connect the unit via USB to a laptop/PC/Mac to upload your data or download routes. The 500/800 should come down in price now the newer 510/810 is available.

    I have the 800 and I'm delighted with it. It has got me home several times, taken me around Sportives where the signs have been removed and taken my on rides to places I would never have bothered with had I had to use maps or a mobile phone.