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What standards / tests does a new manufacturer have to...

Chris1234567Chris1234567 Posts: 4
edited April 2013 in MTB general
I'm wondering what standards a small scale parts manufacturer has to adhere to, and what test should be carried out?
Does anyone know of the relevant document?

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Depends but basically nothing, unless the buyer wants something.
    Or you could be more specific.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

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  • ClankClank Posts: 2,323
    cooldad wrote:
    Depends.

    This. So very much this.

    Think what you need to get tested and you may find Google a good friend.
    How would I write my own epitaph? With a crayon - I'm not allowed anything I can sharpen to a sustainable point.

    Disclaimer: Opinions expressed herein are worth exactly what you paid for them.
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    None at all.
    However there are many, many relevant standards and documents.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • ClankClank Posts: 2,323
    ilovedirt wrote:
    None at all.

    Not corrent, I'm afraid. Certain parts may need to adhere to certain key standards in order to attain relevent safety marks/ certification.

    We have no idea what these 'small parts' the OP is talking about may be.
    How would I write my own epitaph? With a crayon - I'm not allowed anything I can sharpen to a sustainable point.

    Disclaimer: Opinions expressed herein are worth exactly what you paid for them.
  • ilovedirtilovedirt Posts: 5,798
    Ok yeah safety critical parts will have to adhere to standards, but generally, you don't HAVE to adhere to standards. It does depend entirely what the parts are though, what you're trying to achieve etc etc.
    I've no idea about bike component specific standards, however there are plenty of quality management standards and certification bodies out there that cover pretty much anything.
    Production Privee Shan

    B'Twin Triban 5
  • Thanks for the replys.
    At the moment we are making mainly small parts such as lock-rings, aheadset rings, bolt caps etc not the most safety related parts.
    But thinking to move onto cranks, stems etc. I thought I had read that products make in the UK had to be CE approved?
    I can't find anything on it now though! I was up Untill 4:30am this morning searching but couldnt really find anything.

    Thanks.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Nope. But out of curiosity I checked four boxes lying around - Deore crankset, KCNC stem, Bontrager tyre and Planet X tubes. None have any safety or other standard printed on them.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • LagrangeLagrange Posts: 652
    There are standards for importing whole bikes and probably standards for components. They are to do with safety. contact Intertek - I know they do testing for imported Taiwanese bikes - I used to work for them!
  • Lagrange wrote:
    There are standards for importing whole bikes and probably standards for components. They are to do with safety. contact Intertek - I know they do testing for imported Taiwanese bikes - I used to work for them!


    Thanks for that, I'll look into it.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Considering the drek sold by Toys r Us etc, the standards can't be very high. Or the testers are doing a really censored job.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • LagrangeLagrange Posts: 652
    Cooldad
    The four different CEN standards that were published in the EU Official Journal are:

    EN 14764 for City and Trekking bicycles
    EN 14766 for Mountain bicycles
    EN 14781 for Racing bicycles
    EN 14872 for Bicycles – Accessories for bicycles – Luggage carriers.

    EN 14765 for childrens bikes has not yet been published.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Lagrange wrote:
    Cooldad
    The four different CEN standards that were published in the EU Official Journal are:

    EN 14764 for City and Trekking bicycles
    EN 14766 for Mountain bicycles
    EN 14781 for Racing bicycles
    EN 14872 for Bicycles – Accessories for bicycles – Luggage carriers.

    EN 14765 for childrens bikes has not yet been published.
    And your point is?
    Considering:
    http://www.toysrus.co.uk/Toys-R-Us/Bike ... Position=0
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • danlikesbikesdanlikesbikes Posts: 3,898
    Lagrange wrote:
    Cooldad
    The four different CEN standards that were published in the EU Official Journal are:

    EN 14764 for City and Trekking bicycles
    EN 14766 for Mountain bicycles
    EN 14781 for Racing bicycles
    EN 14872 for Bicycles – Accessories for bicycles – Luggage carriers.

    EN 14765 for childrens bikes has not yet been published.

    All the above are correct, however are for whole bikes (the last published one is for accessories such as bags etc but not parts) that are sold in the UK or imported into the UK. There is nothing to state that you can not change components who do not have to comply with the above rules.
    Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Standards are obviously lower than Crudcatcher.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • batmobatmo Posts: 277
    Those EN standards may be only a specification for the bikes or components or they could include or refer to tests in other standards. The last section in the standard (known as Annex ZA) gives the "level of attestation of conformity" which sets out which tests must be done, if the manufacturer can do them themselves or use an independent test house and the frequency of factory production control inspections.

    And yes, this rubbish is part of my job, albeit in a different industry. After reading a few ENs, watching paint dry seems action-packed...
    Viscount Grand Touring - in bits
    Trek ZX6500 - semi-retired
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