Shoe advice (apologies if probably done to death!)

shakyjake
shakyjake Posts: 17
edited March 2013 in Road beginners
Hi folks.

I've been thoroughly enjoying the roadie riding experience recently and I've quickly noticed that I need to get some spd pedals and shoes because my feet keep slipping off during the ride.

Now I think have found a combo that might suit me but I was just hoping for some advice about whether this combo is actually compatible and is it a decent setup? If the links don't work then I am looking to get the A530 pedals and the shimano mt43 shoes.

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-a530-sp ... ng-pedals/

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-mt43-sp ... ing-shoes/

Would welcome any thoughts on this one. Thanks

Comments

  • pride4ever
    pride4ever Posts: 510
    Shoes= wrong. Just wrong.
    the deeper the section the deeper the pleasure.
  • shakyjake
    shakyjake Posts: 17
    Huh?
  • philwint
    philwint Posts: 763
    He is saying that those don't look sufficiently "Roadie" (more touring or MTB)
  • mikeabanks
    mikeabanks Posts: 116
    If you want roadie SPD shoes try the shimano rt82
  • navrig
    navrig Posts: 1,352
    Bike shoes come in different fits. I wouldn't suggest you buy your first pair online. Go to a shop and try different makes.
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    I have those exact shoes and pedals for my hybrid and I must say they are really comfy, could wear them and walk around all day great choice for a mountain bike or hybrid I WOULD NOT WEAR THEM ON A ROAD BIKE.

    These shoes will catch your front wheel.

    Try road shoes/pedals, but if you really want spd pedals (as opposed SPD SL) then you can get touring shoes that look like road shoes with a sole that you can walk on that use spd cleats.

    (You may want to look up the difference between SPD SL and SPD, they have a different cleat system)
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    pride4ever wrote:
    Shoes= wrong. Just wrong.
    MTB shoes on a road bike may be against your clique's petty rules but no-one else cares.

    Navrig's comment about fit is important, I'd recommend trying a couple of makes if you can. I have Shimano MT40 and both Specialized Sport in both MTB (SPD) and road (SPD-SL) style. Both the Spesh feel slightly comfier but after 5 years of almost daily use the Shimano ones still work fine.

    If your journeys are stop-start and mean clipping in and out a lot then double-sided SPDs are easier but otherwise the A520/A530 are both excellent pedals.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • shakyjake
    shakyjake Posts: 17
    Ahh thanks guys. Particularly that point about shoes catching on the bike because I'm already doing that in my trainers.

    I am fairly open minded when it comes to either mtb or roadie shoe but I've heard you can hobble and skid like a git in roadie shoes which is why I've erred to the mtb shoes.

    Thanks for the heads up on the pedals too. I will look at the shimano shoes suggested and these spd sl's although I've heard they're not newb friendly.
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    shakyjake wrote:
    I am fairly open minded when it comes to either mtb or roadie shoe but I've heard you can hobble and skid like a git in roadie shoes which is why I've erred to the mtb shoes.
    Unless you're racing I'd ignore SPD-SLs. The negligible benefit is outweighed by the downsides, which are significant for commuting and recreational riding.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • There is nothing wrong with using SPDs on a road bike. Road shoes and pedals simply allow a larger cleat. Anyone that thinks that road pedals make them faster is very gullible at best and delusional at worst! For those of us that go to places by bike a lot, SPDs can be extremely handy. The aesthetic may be different, but A) enough road cyclists use SPDs, and b) there are plenty of SPD shoes styled after road shoes anyway (not to mention that high end MTB and CX racing shoes tend to look similar anyway)
  • shakyjake
    shakyjake Posts: 17
    I think I will be going for spd cleats but those rt82 shoes look good.

    Will check them out
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    Really pleased with my RT82 shoes

    cheapest place I found for rt82...
    http://www.fatbirds.co.uk/newsearchres. ... imanuid=70
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    It is not so much the SPD thing it is more those specific shoes I think.

    There are plenty of SPD shoes that allow you to walk but do not look like Moon boots :-)
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Mikey41
    Mikey41 Posts: 690
    ^^ indeed. I went for the Shimano M077 shoes.. which are absolutely identical to R077's except for the sole. They are working great and I like them a lot :)
    Giant Defy 2 (2012)
    Giant Defy Advanced 2 (2013)
    Giant Revel 1 Ltd (2013)
    Strava
  • I have just taken the plunge and bought the a520 pedal and specialized mtb sport shoe ( newer version). I havent had chance to get out on the road with them yet but they are a good fit in terms of the fact the pedal also has a platform that sits nicely against the tread on the shoe providing extra support than just the mtb cleat alone. A touring shoe will be a bit more flexible than you might want becasue they are designed with a resonable amount of walking in mind.
  • pride4ever
    pride4ever Posts: 510
    Simon E wrote:
    pride4ever wrote:
    Shoes= wrong. Just wrong.
    MTB shoes on a road bike may be against your clique's petty rules but no-one else cares.

    Navrig's comment about fit is important, I'd recommend trying a couple of makes if you can. I have Shimano MT40 and both Specialized Sport in both MTB (SPD) and road (SPD-SL) style. Both the Spesh feel slightly comfier but after 5 years of almost daily use the Shimano ones still work fine.

    If your journeys are stop-start and mean clipping in and out a lot then double-sided SPDs are easier but otherwise the A520/A530 are both excellent pedals.

    Your either nuts or simply dont understand power transfer.
    the deeper the section the deeper the pleasure.
  • team47b
    team47b Posts: 6,425
    A touring shoe will be a bit more flexible than you might want becasue they are designed with a resonable amount of walking in mind.

    Do you own touring shoes, have you tried to flex the sole as a comparison?

    The rt82 is no more flexible than a comparable priced road shoe, own both tried it as a test, the soles are the same, it is only the rubber around the cleat that makes them easier to walk in, they do not flex
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • team47b wrote:
    A touring shoe will be a bit more flexible than you might want becasue they are designed with a resonable amount of walking in mind.

    Do you own touring shoes, have you tried to flex the sole as a comparison?

    The rt82 is no more flexible than a comparable priced road shoe, own both tried it as a test, the soles are the same, it is only the rubber around the cleat that makes them easier to walk in, they do not flex

    I was responding to the OP. Not specifically the shoe you are talking about which does look like a nice shoe tbf.

    I did try a few different shoes on and 'generally' the few touring shoes i tried were not as stiff as the Specialized mtb ones I bought. The touring shoes you have linked to are not the same as a good few other touring shoes that do actually flex slightly more.

    The most important point i was making that I dont want to get lost here was how well the flat platform on the A 520 sat tight against the tread from the shoe which widened the contact points considerably compared to just the cleat alone like on a double sided spd pedal.
  • danlikesbikes
    danlikesbikes Posts: 3,898
    Navrig wrote:
    Bike shoes come in different fits. I wouldn't suggest you buy your first pair online. Go to a shop and try different makes.

    ^-^ Agree with this.

    Different makes/models of shoes tend to be thinner/wider, stiffer/softer etc in the same size. Go try on a few so you can get a feel for which fit and work for you. Sizing can be quite different (check the reviews from other Wiggle users)

    As for the pedals & shoes you mention they will work and are compatible. Hard to say if they suit you as not sure what type of riding your doing or what you want to gain other than your feet not slipping. The shoes are as they say touring/leisure shoes so are good for riding on the bike & walking in as the cleat (the part that attaches your shoe to the pedal) is recessed by the shoe design and the sole pattern. I guess for the more style conscious they look more like a set of trainers than out and out roadie shoes which when walking into a pub lets say might also be a factor.
    Pain hurts much less if its topped off with beating your mates to top of a climb.
  • muzzan
    muzzan Posts: 203
    Or order a couple of sizes & send the wrong ones back, just done this with some r087's from Wiggle, very little hastle.
  • zx6man
    zx6man Posts: 1,092
    Mikey41 wrote:
    ^^ indeed. I went for the Shimano M077 shoes.. which are absolutely identical to R077's except for the sole. They are working great and I like them a lot :)


    +1 4000 miles and still like new.
  • So would i be right in thinking that my shimano M530's and LG monte shoes fitted to a litespeed L3, Despite being comfortable, Improving my power from riding on flats and never having touched the front wheel...was a bad idea?
  • chatlow
    chatlow Posts: 845
    Navrig wrote:
    Bike shoes come in different fits. I wouldn't suggest you buy your first pair online. Go to a shop and try different makes.

    ^-^ Agree with this.

    Different makes/models of shoes tend to be thinner/wider, stiffer/softer etc in the same size. Go try on a few so you can get a feel for which fit and work for you. Sizing can be quite different (check the reviews from other Wiggle users)

    As for the pedals & shoes you mention they will work and are compatible. Hard to say if they suit you as not sure what type of riding your doing or what you want to gain other than your feet not slipping. The shoes are as they say touring/leisure shoes so are good for riding on the bike & walking in as the cleat (the part that attaches your shoe to the pedal) is recessed by the shoe design and the sole pattern. I guess for the more style conscious they look more like a set of trainers than out and out roadie shoes which when walking into a pub lets say might also be a factor.

    i second this. i tried a few on in evans cycles then did the cheap thing and ordered the correct ones online! quite surprised i went for a size 10 when I'm usually a size 9.

    my bike came with r540 spd-sl pedals and when I asked around, a lot of people said that MTB shoes would be more comfy and easier to walk in. I only use my bike for commutes and weekend training so kept the road shoe with the floating cleat. I've heard you can get an adaptor if you don't want to replace the pedals