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Neck ache

Steve236Steve236 Posts: 212
edited February 2013 in Road beginners
I've searched on neck ache on the forum and found answers that say its from reaching too much and that its from having too short a cockpit. These things can't both be right...right?

I've been out on my new road bike 3 times now (coming from mountain bike riding) - first two were about 15 miles each and no neck ache. Yesterday I did 50 miles and today have had neck ache (and a bit of a headache to go with it). I'm not in any rush to change anything yet as its probably largely to do with it being my first long ride in a new position.

If it remains a problem (say after another 2 or 3 50 milers), what's the best solution? Flip the stem...shorter stem...longer stem???

Posts

  • Base of neck, is this?

    I had this until I

    a) flipped the stem, thus raising the bars a bit, thus nor forcing me to tip my head quite as far back while looking along the road.

    b) started stretching my neck out from time to time when I could afford to take my eyes off the road for a few moments at a time.

    I think it was the stretching that was more effective, so I'll flip the stem back down again at some point, see if it starts hurting again.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • Steve236Steve236 Posts: 212
    Hard to pinpoint really but its more the top of my neck hence the feeling of a headache too.
  • ...what distances did you do mountain biking? ....from 15 to 50 on the road is quite a jump, which may just be too much too soon causing the neck ache - maybe try a few 20's or so and see if it causes the same problem?..

    ..also, was it full suss mtb, or always off-road?..might be that your not used to the road buzz coming up through the frame and seat post..

    ..otherwise, I guess you want to get as upright as possible to mimick your position on the mtb - so flipped stem is a starting point.

    A proper bike fit may be the answer, but you may not be prepared to shell out for that jsut yet..
  • Steve236 wrote:
    I've searched on neck ache on the forum and found answers that say its from reaching too much and that its from having too short a cockpit. These things can't both be right...right?

    I've been out on my new road bike 3 times now (coming from mountain bike riding) - first two were about 15 miles each and no neck ache. Yesterday I did 50 miles and today have had neck ache (and a bit of a headache to go with it). I'm not in any rush to change anything yet as its probably largely to do with it being my first long ride in a new position.

    If it remains a problem (say after another 2 or 3 50 milers), what's the best solution? Flip the stem...shorter stem...longer stem???
    It's almost certainly bad Aids.
  • Steve236Steve236 Posts: 212
    I was riding mostly 15-30 mile rides on the mtb (should have said this is on the road too) and also I've done a couple of 40 milers on it recently with no problem. So the road bike rides aren't a sudden jump in distance overall although yesterday's ride was a big jump for rides on the road bike.
  • Steve236Steve236 Posts: 212
    It's almost certainly bad Aids.
    Eh?
  • It gets better with time.
    the deeper the section the deeper the pleasure.
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,123
    My neck used to ache when I first went from MTB to roadie. Couldn't flip the stem cos it had already been done when I had the fitting. (long legs / short torso / small frame conundrum)
    It might have been pure coincidence but it really improved when I had to replace my peaked mtb helmet with a road version. Could also have been the increasing mileage / practice.
  • Mikey23Mikey23 Posts: 5,306
    Not an expert here but I would have thought that holding the neck at an unfamiliar angle for quite a long time is likely to cause pain. I would assume that as muscles etc get stronger and more used to it, it will go away
  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    Your head is quite heavy and so it takes a while for your muscles to become accustomed to holding it at an angle. Adjusting your position to be more upright helps, as well as regularly changing your hand position. Also, try and keep a relaxed grip without locking your elbows as it reduces the muscle strain.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
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