Three milestones in one day...

chrisaonabike
chrisaonabike Posts: 1,914
edited January 2013 in Road beginners
Just thought I'd share ...

- My first thousand miles (in exactly three months - my first ride on the Defy was Oct 6th)
- My first 50 miler
- My first 100k

Here's the route. I got to within a few miles of home, looked at the total distance, and realised I wouldn't make it to 100k unless I added some on - the Richmond Park lap was quite hard cos I was running out of energy a bit by then.

69 miles though - I'm a bit sore, but 100 miles now feels, if not anywhere near easy, at least within reach.

Need to clean the bike now, before I fall asleep...
Is the gorilla tired yet?

Comments

  • unixnerd
    unixnerd Posts: 2,864
    If you can keep that up over the winter you'll be in great shape for summer :-)
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  • elderone
    elderone Posts: 1,410
    Nice one chris,thats cracking progress and a good average as well.Was hoping to get my first 50 today as its a cracking day here,but got the flu bug thats been doing the rounds so not a happy bunny.
    Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori
  • elderone
    elderone Posts: 1,410
    Nice one chris,thats cracking progress and a good average as well.Was hoping to get my first 50 today as its a cracking day here,but got the flu bug thats been doing the rounds so not a happy bunny.
    Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Well done Chris, that's a decent average speed too.
  • lc1981
    lc1981 Posts: 820
    Nice one. I was out riding that way myself over Christmas. Very flat (other than the park) but it can get pretty windy along by the river!
  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,339
    Chrisonabike: One word - Cadence.

    I recently purchased a set of rollers. Now I have been cycling years but getting used to the rollers was pretty tough and I cannot say I have mastered it yet. Your asking "what the hells he on about?". I thought my technique was pretty good until I got on the rollers, it exagerates all your weaknesses in terms of balance, handlebar grip and most importantly it helps you develop a very smooth pedalling style.
    This is your key to the 100 miler. Whenever and wherever you are riding, concentrate hard on maintaining a smooth 90 rpm or above. It then comes down to energy - the amount you consume. At any point, if you start to pedal squares, your in the wrong gear and/or you are building up lactic acid (almost unavoidable on a very hilly ride). Once lactic acid has got to a certain level, the muscle performs badly. Pedalling fast helps reduce this lactic acid build up but the only way you sustain that pedal speed is how you prepare and what you eat on the go. Theoretically if you are not overweight and not at your absolute physical limit, that last 31 miles for the century ride should be achievable without that much more effort. Efficiency and maintaining a smooth pedalling style could be the difference.
    Oh and stretching and keeping supple is so very important, you can also stretch on the bike as you go. Ride like an Italian - Piano piano (softly softly) and maintain the suppleness (Belgian/French: 'Souplesse').
    Good luck.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • ...Whenever and wherever you are riding, concentrate hard on maintaining a smooth 90 rpm or above.
    Thanks for this. I am gradually increasing the cadence. Haven't got it to 90 yet, probably about 80 typically, but I can't even maintain that on the hills yet - I have to slow it down, even in bottom gear (34/28). I'm thinking of swapping the 12-28 cassette for a 12-30.
    Theoretically if you are not overweight and not at your absolute physical limit, that last 31 miles for the century ride should be achievable without that much more effort. Efficiency and maintaining a smooth pedalling style could be the difference.
    I'm about 7-10 pounds overweight I reckon, but most of the time I could probably go a bit faster. I tend to go a bit harder once I know a route and am able to pace myself.
    you can also stretch on the bike as you go.
    Yes, I've started doing this - calves anyway. I stand up and drop a heel down to stretch the calf, then the same the other side. It makes a bit difference to the way the legs feel.
    Good luck.
    Thanks! It feels like very early days, but the miles do seem to roll by more easily than they did. All points regarding efficicient pedalling noted.

    Thanks too for everyone's good wishes. Hope the flu clears up quickly, Elder, but if it's real flu, expect to be out of action for at least ten days or more likely a couple of weeks.
    Is the gorilla tired yet?
  • dabber
    dabber Posts: 1,926
    Well done Chris. You came out my way... I'm often out over the Mytchett, Deepcut area.
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  • pinno
    pinno Posts: 51,339
    Thanks for this. I am gradually increasing the cadence. Haven't got it to 90 yet, probably about 80 typically, but I can't even maintain that on the hills yet - I have to slow it down, even in bottom gear (34/28). I'm thinking of swapping the 12-28 cassette for a 12-30.

    Very, very difficult to keep a cadence of 90rpm up a hill unless you're in top shape and smashing it to bits. The rule of 90 is really an average. If (and its very useful) you have a compooter with cadence. If you keep it in cadence mode on the display, you tend to get fixated on cadence rather than speed - which is more constructive. Surprising how it (unconsciously) dips and rises - you get to iron it out a little. So don't get rid of your cassette just yet.
    Cadel Evans in 2011 after over 2000 miles, averaged 104rpm for that final (rolling) TT in the TdF - that really puts his effort into perspective, but we aren't Cadels.
    If you're over 75kg's, hills are never going to be a fluid task. Uphill - power to weight ratio. On the flat, power to drag. 7-10lbs extra will disappear at the rate your going, I wouldn't worry.
    seanoconn - gruagach craic!
  • Mikey41
    Mikey41 Posts: 690
    Well done Chris!

    I need to get a move on, been slacking too much with distances :(
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