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The expected life-span of a cleat

ringwormringworm Posts: 16
edited November 2012 in Road beginners
I picked up a set of Shimano R540 SPD-Sl pedals and the floating cleats to match.
I've been out in them about six times now and am disappointed to see that the little yellow stud on the outside edge of the foot has completely fallen off. The outside stud on the other foot is coming away from the cleat body. I've done very minimal walking in them, basically getting on and off the bike but already need to buy a new pair. I don't understand why the cleats aren't cast/formed from one solid piece of nylon/plastic, the two layer manufacturing makes them very weak at the join.
Can anyone comment on the durability or otherwise of their choice in cleats. Do Look Keo cleats last longer? Are they formed in one piece? Would be a shame to have to buy a different set of pedals but I don't want to have to fork out for a new set every month or so.

Posts

  • peatpeat Posts: 1,243
    Swap them between the shoes before you get rid of them. Get equal wear.
  • Sounds like you may have some dodgy cleats there, mine last around a year of commuting before being consigned to the bin
  • nweststeynnweststeyn Posts: 1,574
    Look Keo cleats are generally notorious for being the worst for life-span...

    I use them mind and don't mind changing them every 6 months in the same way I don't mind changing my brake pads, inner tubes and other 'sundries'.
  • Buckie2k5Buckie2k5 Posts: 600
    the yellow bits at back fell of mine soon after buying them. However the main yellow bit is the only bit in contact with the pedal and this is still as good as new. i wouldnt worry about it.
  • Will swap my current set from left to right and see how they wear.
    If the nose of the cleat is still good (and mine are) does this mean they are still good to go? What do the two yellow 'studs' at either side of the spd-sl cleat actually do?
  • TakeTurnsTakeTurns Posts: 1,075
    I get about 3000miles out of mine before they're absolutely worn. The yellow bits on mine fell off pretty early too, didn't make a noticeable difference though.

    Alternatively, there are cleat covers which you can wear over the cleat while walking in them.
  • The same thing happened to me and one small yellow wear marker detached from each of my cleats. I ended up chancing my arm and asking for a replacement and Merlin Cycles being who they are sent me out a new set as 'goodwill gesture'. I'd done around 300 miles on mine and most of my riding had been done on open country roads so I rarely unclipped or walked on them.

    I now make sure I don't drag my feet either when walking or when stopping at lights and so far so good.
  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,433
    The yellow bits are slightly softer, so you don't skid about so much when you walk. They're not actually in contact with the pedals so losing a yellow bit won't effect the pedal cleat operation.
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • MattC59 wrote:
    The yellow bits are slightly softer, so you don't skid about so much when you walk. They're not actually in contact with the pedals so losing a yellow bit won't effect the pedal cleat operation.

    I always thought the yellow bits were 'wear indicators' and was led to believe that when they wear down to the marked line (which is level with the black part of the cleat) then it was time to replace them?

    At least that was Shimano's guidance in their leaflet that came with my R540 pedals & cleats?
  • :shock: Cleats have wear indicators? mine have upwards of 5k miles on them between road and mtbing. They clip in and stay clipped in so.. surely when they can no longer do that they count as worn out!
  • MattC59 wrote:
    The yellow bits are slightly softer, so you don't skid about so much when you walk. They're not actually in contact with the pedals so losing a yellow bit won't effect the pedal cleat operation.

    this

    The yellow bits are rubber whereas the main body is hard plastic. If you were to walk around on just the hard plastic there is a chance you could skid, fall over and look a censored , no one wants that ! They are not wear indicators as far as I know (happy to be proved wrong).
    I have had my current cleats on for over a year / 4000 miles and are still going strong although a little worn and the yellow rubber bits are looking a little tatty but then, as others have said, I too don't walk around too much with them on.
    A person who aims at nothing is sure to hit it

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  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    I'm sticking with my SPD's. The cleats appear to last about 10 years when used exclusively for road cycling.
  • d10brpd10brp Posts: 70
    My first set of SPD-SL cleats got worn pretty quickly (scuffed up and back yellow bits fell off) so I wear these over the top of my new ones and they still look as good as new
    Scott CR1 Pro
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  • MattC59MattC59 Posts: 5,433
    fgaffney wrote:

    That's called ar*e covering. The yellow or red part of the cleat does not engage the pedal at all. Clip your shoe in and have a look for yourself.

    They're basically saying that if they wear through from the tiny bit of wear from walking, then it's probably an indication that the engaging part of the cleat is worn. Obviously, that's not going to be the case if you walk on them a lot or have knocked the rubbers off.
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • giropaulgiropaul Posts: 414
    Some cleats, like Look Delta, have wear indicators. Otherwise it's a judgement, but it will depend on how often you clip out for junctions etc - in other words where you ride. Walking on them does destroy them quicker.

    However, using worn cleats is a recipe for damaged knees, I'd rather replace a set every couple of months or so than have wrecked joints.
  • pilot_petepilot_pete Posts: 1,961
    I swapped from Look Keos which lasted about 6 months to Speedplay Zeros. They are £35 a pair, but they just go on and on. I've done about 8000 miles on my first pair and over a year and they are scuffed, but no signs of wearing out. They have metal base plates, so are a lot more hard wearing. The coffee shop covers are a useful addition if you plan to walk in them. I find now the replaceable heel pads wear out out more quickly on my Sidis, just as well they are replaceable too!

    PP
  • andy 3654andy 3654 Posts: 183
    Glad to know I'm not the only one with this problem.
  • Peddle Up!Peddle Up! Posts: 2,040
    Pilot Pete wrote:
    I swapped from Look Keos which lasted about 6 months to Speedplay Zeros. They are £35 a pair, but they just go on and on. I've done about 8000 miles on my first pair and over a year and they are scuffed, but no signs of wearing out. They have metal base plates, so are a lot more hard wearing. The coffee shop covers are a useful addition if you plan to walk in them. I find now the replaceable heel pads wear out out more quickly on my Sidis, just as well they are replaceable too!

    PP

    +1 to this. I try to use the covers if I'm going to be walking over gravel, but otherwise the metal plates are tough enough for the ocassional "off bike" steep climb (I know, I know :roll: ).
    Purveyor of "up" :)
  • I stumped up for a new set of SPD-SLs but think I will ride the current set into the ground before I swap them over. I'd seen the leaflet that came with the cleats regarding 'wear indicator' but hadn't taken my foot out of the shoe to see if the studs made contact with the pedal in some way. Makes sense that they are there for stability I guess. The covers seem like a reasonable idea... and the leaky tap of ongoing bike maintenance slowly drains my wallet.
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