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what's your demand for cycling clothes?

haegeonhaegeon Posts: 3
edited October 2012 in Road general
Hi, We are two International Fashion students currently working on the development of a sustainable cycling wear collection. By answering our questions you can help us to find out what is most important for cycling wear and which sustainable features you would appreciate.We hope that you can enjoy our questionnaire.

Or you can just answer here that will help a lot to make new cycling clothes

http://kwiksurveys.com/app/rendersurvey ... urveys.com

Posts

  • I'll answer the underlying question on that form....


    No I am not willing to pay more for poor fitting recycled toilet paper cycle clothing.
  • jay197jay197 Posts: 196
    Lycra-Byka wrote:
    I'll answer the underlying question on that form....


    No I am not willing to pay more for poor fitting recycled toilet paper cycle clothing.


    but if you do, you will single handedly save the planet................ :lol:

    I wonder.............. will "carbon" bibs melt in the rain then :twisted:
  • declan1declan1 Posts: 2,470
    Just did the survey for no particular reason.

    Big design flaw - questions 8 and 9 require you to rate your current cycling gear and rate what features are most important to influence future cycling gear purchases. Each level (1-9) can only be used once per question. For example if I rated both fit and comfort a 5, I would have to change one or the other so they're not the same.

    Road - Dolan Preffisio
    MTB - On-One Inbred

    I have no idea what's going on here.
  • me-109me-109 Posts: 1,304
    ^^that does it then … I'm out!
  • SproolSprool Posts: 1,022
    what do you mean by 'sustainable clothing'? Sustainability is the capacity to endure, so do you mean clothing that will last a long time and not rip, fade or wear out?
  • dw300dw300 Posts: 1,642
    I'm out ..
    All the above is just advice .. you can do whatever the f*ck you wana do!
    Bike Radar Strava Club
    The Northern Ireland Thread
  • I mean, eco-friendly for the planet! Sorry for the flaw of the questionnaire but there was no option for that. And thank you very much for your answers :)
  • diydiy Posts: 6,680
    Sounds like another student survey designed to tick a box for a thesis.

    where are the creative ideas?
    - what about clothing with integrated lighting?
    - what about abrasion resistance in strike areas?
    - built in compression to improve performance?
    - back protectors?
    - expandable pockets?

    So many areas to explore.
  • SproolSprool Posts: 1,022
    haegeon wrote:
    I mean, eco-friendly for the planet! Sorry for the flaw of the questionnaire but there was no option for that. And thank you very much for your answers :)
    I guess most cyclists feel they are already contributing to the planet's welfare by not using fuel-based vehicles that pollute. What of eco-friendly clothing though? Does that mean all natural hemp, cotton, linen items or recycled fabrics? What of man-made fibres, using reprocessed waste petrochemicals from the oil industry? (Like nylon, polyester, lycra, etc. etc.) Better to put these chemicals to good use and make synthetic yarn from them than pour them back into the sea. The whole eco-friendy thing is fraught with rubbish, it just depends on how far down the manufacturing and supply chain you want to go to support your argument. Since most of us are almost exclusively buying cost-effective alloy frames from China/Taiwan we are contributing to a heavy use of fuel + pollution in the shipping and transport industry. Pay more and buy local :)
  • keef66keef66 Posts: 13,286
    When I choose cycle clothing I look for function, fit and price. If it looks good it's also a bonus. Sustainability, whatever that means, doesn't come into it at all.

    By cycling instead of driving I'm already doing my bit for the planet.

    I do have a merino wool base layer which I use in the depths of winter, but that's because it's warm and handles moisture without becoming smelly. Ditto the Woolie Boolie socks.

    I also have a thinner base layer made allegedly from bamboo which I bought out of curiosity, but which has proved to be very comfortable next to the skin and also non smelly.

    My favourite garments are however all synthetic stuff with I suspect a dodgy environmental footprint: Goretex Paclite Path waterproof jacket, Gore Windstopper Phantom jacket, a winter buff with a fleecy section at one end, my Planet X neoprene overshoes, and my DHB roubaix bibtights and summer bibshorts.
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    Lycra-Byka wrote:
    I'll answer the underlying question on that form....


    No I am not willing to pay more for poor fitting recycled toilet paper cycle clothing.
    I kind of agree with this sentiment and the interpretation of the survey.

    I also agree with the other poster who saw this survey as another tick-the-box thing for someone's thesis.

    The questions are not very well thought out - eg: how much do you pay for an average article of cycle clothing? What is average? A pair of socks? A Rapha softshell jacket? How much do you spend over a year might make some sense, but not this. Ditto some of the other questions.

    I think you'll find a lot of people's eyes glaze over at the mention of sustainable this or eco-that. Too often it just becomes a buzzword or somebody's great marketing hope, or hype.
  • haegeon wrote:
    I mean, eco-friendly for the planet!

    Ecology: The scientific study of the relationships that living organisms have with each other and with their natural environment.

    The planet is not a living organism so cannot benefit from "eco-friendliness".
  • SproolSprool Posts: 1,022
    O/T but holistically I think the planet can be viewed of as a living organism, a complex network of interdependant subsystems, environments and creatures. Geologically speaking its a spinning ball of rock, soil and water, most of which is inert. It just depends on your viewpoint. However none of this has any bearing on choosing my next cycling top, whose over-riding factor for me will be how cool all the little logos look.
  • BunnehBunneh Posts: 1,329
    When something claims to be large it should actually be LARGE, not small to medium... I have a 36 waist, I have to buy XXL baggies since their 'large' wouldn't fit a whippet.
  • Bunneh wrote:
    When something claims to be large it should actually be LARGE, not small to medium... I have a 36 waist, I have to buy XXL baggies since their 'large' wouldn't fit a whippet.


    Listen to this person please.

    Let's have a universal sizing system for all cycling clothing. Personally I think it's a ploy for manufacturers to let you buy the wrong size and then not bother to return it but buy another instead (purely because youre too embarrassed to admit to them that although you'd belive your a Large in their eyes your actually a whale. XXL !?! )
  • team47bteam47b Posts: 6,424
    sustainable Fashion, a little oxymoronic me thinks :D
    my isetta is a 300cc bike
  • HoopdriverHoopdriver Posts: 2,023
    team47b wrote:
    sustainable Fashion, a little oxymoronic me thinks :D
    Nice point
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,360
    Lycra-Byka wrote:
    Bunneh wrote:
    When something claims to be large it should actually be LARGE, not small to medium... I have a 36 waist, I have to buy XXL baggies since their 'large' wouldn't fit a whippet.


    Listen to this person please.

    Let's have a universal sizing system for all cycling clothing. Personally I think it's a ploy for manufacturers to let you buy the wrong size and then not bother to return it but buy another instead (purely because youre too embarrassed to admit to them that although you'd belive your a Large in their eyes your actually a whale. XXL !?! )
    You're joking, right? Sizing in clothes in general has been going in the opposite direction in the last 10 years, I used to be a medium but now have to buy "small" in almost all clothing, and although I'm not tall I'm not a midget either at 5' 9". Even small sizes are now getting too big unless you are a few pounds overweight, and in many/most shops it is now impossible to get any trousers/jeans with a waist size less than 30" (I'm 28").

    Cycling clothing from at least some manufacturers (the Italian ones mostly) is about the only exception to this rule, in that medium has stayed as medium, not been upsized into large... The only reason you might think it is on the small side for the size is because all other clothing has been upsized in recent years and it seems small by comparison. Sizing in Italian cycling clothing is spot on, deal with it!
  • SproolSprool Posts: 1,022
    i think the important point is universal sizing, not whether it drifts up or down. I buy XXL t-shirts on trips to China and Korea and they are a squeeze. I buy L in USA and they are massive. Italy may be spot on but its then all the others that should comply with them. UK varies widely depending on where it is sourced. Universal and agreed sizing would be great but the clothing industry is so very diverse and entry level to market quite low, so it would be very hard to police well.
  • neebneeb Posts: 4,360
    I agree that universal sizing would be great, as long as there ARE sizes to fit all! The problem at the moment in general clothing (and in some American brand cycle clothing) is that there actually isn't a size to fit anyone who isn't big or overweight, because small is a large medium and there isn't anything smaller...
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    neeb - I think you will find a small American IS a Large :-)
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • dw300dw300 Posts: 1,642
    Goddamit! There is universal sizing, measure your damn body rather than presume that since you are a 36 waist in your favourite trousers, you're also a 36 in cycling shorts!

    Nearly every manufacturer I've bought from has a sizing guide that includes measurements in centimeters or inches.
    All the above is just advice .. you can do whatever the f*ck you wana do!
    Bike Radar Strava Club
    The Northern Ireland Thread
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    dw300 wrote:
    Goddamit! There is universal sizing, measure your damn body rather than presume that since you are a 36 waist in your favourite trousers, you're also a 36 in cycling shorts!

    Nearly every manufacturer I've bought from has a sizing guide that includes measurements in centimeters or inches.

    Whilst that is true I think you rather missed the point - they can all be different between manufacturers (e.g. I am large in Gore but can not even fit in an XXL in some Italian brands) so that is not universal sizing is it.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • High visibility please. That will sustain me!
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