Forum home Mountain biking forum MTB buying advice

standover height

mavman46mavman46 Posts: 18
edited September 2012 in MTB buying advice
how important is it for a mtb ,im 5ft8 ,had tested some 17in frames ,sarazen,moda presta,trek all were very tight on the crown jewels when standing on the ground ,so im 154cm ,would anyone buy one of these or go for the small so you can throw it about more and obv more standover height ,i just about purchased a bike today but was unsure about how important the standover height really is .

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    it is irrelevant, it went with the advent of suspension.

    see viewtopic.php?f=10002&t=12692834
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    Well it is relevent to some, or some manufacturers wouldn't be trying to reduce it all the time.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    but it is one of the least important dimensions there are other things that are more important.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • I was always under the impression it was important so that you could step off the bike forward onto the top tube when you crash/bog down/slip and not shear your nuts off, am i correct?

    What even is it for?
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    For that ^. Mainly. Is why I like to have a bit, often stall on extreme rocky terrain, especially on climbs.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,748
    It shouldn't effect your sizing decision, it may effect your buying decision by getting the bike that firs AND gives you better standover versus one that doesn't, I don't need standover as I always fall off sideways.
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    supersonic wrote:
    For that ^. Mainly. Is why I like to have a bit, often stall on extreme rocky terrain, especially on climbs.
    sorry bollocks.

    Paul you are 6 foot? with a 33" in-seam?

    for the shorter people it rarely exists and hell it is not needed. yes you need to be able to move about on the bike and putting one foot down while the other is on a pedal is needed putting both feet down went out with suspension for most of us.

    only ever caught my nuts of a stem. cross bar never learn how to get off a bike in a hurry.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • supersonicsupersonic Posts: 82,708 Lives Here
    I know how I ride, and how I dismount on some terrain. End of.
  • nicklouse wrote:
    supersonic wrote:
    For that ^. Mainly. Is why I like to have a bit, often stall on extreme rocky terrain, especially on climbs.
    sorry bollocks.

    Paul you are 6 foot? with a 33" in-seam?

    for the shorter people it rarely exists and hell it is not needed. yes you need to be able to move about on the bike and putting one foot down while the other is on a pedal is needed putting both feet down went out with suspension for most of us.

    only ever caught my nuts of a stem. cross bar never learn how to get off a bike in a hurry.
    Sometimes you can't choose how you fall off, many times i've had to dismount and i've been perched on narrow rocks where stepping off to the side would have resulted in a 6ft fall either side. Also times when i've gone over the saddle forwards and been physically pushed over the bars by the top tube because i couldnt reach the floor with my feet quick enough.
  • If your balls are resting either side of the tube I would go a size down and poss look to stick a longer stem, I do fall off a lot though. Or go for a bike with a formed top tube: Fuel EX, something like that.
  • If your balls are resting either side of the tube I would go a size down and poss look to stick a longer stem
    Load of rubbish.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    If your balls are resting either side of the tube I would go a size down and poss look to stick a longer stem
    Load of bollocks.
    FTFY
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • hopper1hopper1 Posts: 4,708
    This is confusing me, now...
    When I last bought a MTB, stand over height was a big criteria. Now, as I look around for a new bike, I read this... Then, I check some geometry's and note that across the range of sizes on one model (Scalpel), the stand over only changes by about 1 inch, from S to XL, but the top tube length changes significantly.
    The rule of thumb used to be 4 inches between nads and TT, what is the 'norm' now, then, inch to inch and a half?... :?
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,601
    Depends how low they dangle I guess.
    I don't do smileys.

    There is no secret ingredient - Kung Fu Panda

    London Calling on Facebook

    Parktools
  • hopper1hopper1 Posts: 4,708
    cooldad wrote:
    Depends how low they dangle I guess.

    Just popped out and measured my NRS 1 (Small):
    Stand over is 786mm (31"), same as my inside leg!
    Top tube is 575mm.
    Seat tube is 415mm.

    ALmost identical, to the mm to the Scalpel (Small), and ball park for the Scale (Medium)...
    I'm getting a headache.. :? :(
    Start with a budget, finish with a mortgage!
Sign In or Register to comment.