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Do i just do it!

bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
edited August 2012 in Road beginners
Ok, got the bike, got the commuting kit, got the clothing. Do i just get on the bike and go to work or do i have to train for it?? The commute is from Frome to Bath with a few hills - about 14 miles one way.I'm reasonably fit as i do a bit of regular running. Just do it?
Wilier cento uno.

Posts

  • Why not try it on a Saturday? Less traffic while you get the best route sorted and if you need to you can always bail out half way and go home.
  • What route are you going to take, some horrible hills in and out of Bath, I crawled up Brass Knocker last night swearing all the way up it. :D
  • CiBCiB Posts: 6,098
    Best way by far is to pontificate about it for a few weeks, coming up with ever more convincing reasons why you shouldn't do it. Then it'll be getting on for winter and you'll have until next Easter to decide that it might be possible. Sorted.

    Or you could just give it a go and see what an hour's worth of cycling actually feels like and then wish you'd started when you first thought it might be a good idea. :wink:
  • MrChuckMrChuck Posts: 1,663
    Just do it, but don't necessarily expect to be doing it every day to begin with. Allow yourself plenty of time, don't go nuts, and just see what happens.
  • gthyergthyer Posts: 46
    Why not try it on a Saturday? Less traffic while you get the best route sorted and if you need to you can always bail out half way and go home.

    That's the way that I started a few months back. Thought I'd check the route on a Sunday to see how long the 20 miles in would take. It gave a good indication of the route and potential traffic problems. Not much change in traffic on a weekday but was happy I had tested it first and knew what time I'd have to get up in the morning!

    Also, tackling it in this way meant that I'd cover double the distance with no time constraints, which I could then judge to see how knackered I'd be at work.
    Bianchi Via Nirone 7
    Curtis MX24
    Pashley 26mhz

    http://www.strava.com/athletes/3040565
  • bompingtonbompington Posts: 7,643
    What route are you going to take, some horrible hills in and out of Bath, I crawled up Brass Knocker last night swearing all the way up it. :D
    Watch out for buses coming down :shock:
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    What route are you going to take, some horrible hills in and out of Bath, I crawled up Brass Knocker last night swearing all the way up it. :D

    ah.... the dreaded Brass Knocker! My plan was to simply ride pass Brass Knocker into Bath - just keep going. Longer ride but easier - especially while i'm getting used too SPD's.
    Do you know of any route's into Bath from Frome per chance??? I'm going to use the fast route but obviously more traffic.
    Wilier cento uno.
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    Why not try it on a Saturday? Less traffic while you get the best route sorted and if you need to you can always bail out half way and go home.

    Sounds a sensible idea!
    Wilier cento uno.
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    MrChuck wrote:
    Just do it, but don't necessarily expect to be doing it every day to begin with. Allow yourself plenty of time, don't go nuts, and just see what happens.

    My plan is to commute twice a week. The misses needs my home in a hurry on 3 of the days.
    Wilier cento uno.
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    CiB wrote:
    Best way by far is to pontificate about it for a few weeks, coming up with ever more convincing reasons why you shouldn't do it. Then it'll be getting on for winter and you'll have until next Easter to decide that it might be possible. Sorted.

    Or you could just give it a go and see what an hour's worth of cycling actually feels like and then wish you'd started when you first thought it might be a good idea. :wink:

    Good advice!
    Wilier cento uno.
  • ProssPross Posts: 25,519
    bluedoggy wrote:
    What route are you going to take, some horrible hills in and out of Bath, I crawled up Brass Knocker last night swearing all the way up it. :D

    ah.... the dreaded Brass Knocker! My plan was to simply ride pass Brass Knocker into Bath - just keep going. Longer ride but easier - especially while i'm getting used too SPD's.
    Do you know of any route's into Bath from Frome per chance??? I'm going to use the fast route but obviously more traffic.

    Can't you just use Sustrans route 24 (Colliers Way)? I don't know it but it is apparently mainly tarmac surface with some on road and some virtually traffic free sections. Sounds like a nice commute.
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    Pross wrote:
    bluedoggy wrote:
    What route are you going to take, some horrible hills in and out of Bath, I crawled up Brass Knocker last night swearing all the way up it. :D

    ah.... the dreaded Brass Knocker! My plan was to simply ride pass Brass Knocker into Bath - just keep going. Longer ride but easier - especially while i'm getting used too SPD's.
    Do you know of any route's into Bath from Frome per chance??? I'm going to use the fast route but obviously more traffic.

    Can't you just use Sustrans route 24 (Colliers Way)? I don't know it but it is apparently mainly tarmac surface with some on road and some virtually traffic free sections. Sounds like a nice commute.

    Yes i've herd of this? Does anyone know of a route from the centre of Frome to this? Can anyone show me an online route? Is there an app or anything? Would love to hear from any Fromer's who commute? Actually i'll start another thread on that very subject.....
    Wilier cento uno.
  • If you're fairly fit, fourteen miles shouldn't present too much of a challenge, although bear in mind you're coming back again, so that's nearly thirty miles a day, which can take it's toll after a week if your not used to riding a bike. The biggest problems you face if you're basically fit and not overweight, but you've not ridden a bike much, is general stiffness caused by working for a couple of hours a day in an unfamiliar position.

    With that said, my strongest advice would be for the first week or two to give yourself plenty of time and keep the pace fairly slow and steady (assume an average speed of around 15 mph). Avoid the temptation at least in the early days of attacking hills by keeping the gears low and staying in the saddle as much as possible. This way you'll limit the possibility of being wrecked, too sore and generally cheesed off with it all after the first week.

    You'll find distance is more important than speed which will come naturally, so if you can, find slightly longer routes once you're through the first week (via Oldford and Norton St Philip for example, or the Radstock Road to Faulkland and then to Norton St Philip, or through the - usually muddy! - lanes to Wellow). Different routes also help keep it interesting.

    Perhaps your biggest concern will be the Bath rush-hour traffic which will take time, care and confidence to fully master. Some of the rural roads can also be a bit of a handful at that time of the day too, so bear that in mind.My view is it's not particularly dangerous a long as you're paying attention.

    Good luck and stay with it!
  • bluedoggybluedoggy Posts: 279
    If you're fairly fit, fourteen miles shouldn't present too much of a challenge, although bear in mind you're coming back again, so that's nearly thirty miles a day, which can take it's toll after a week if your not used to riding a bike. The biggest problems you face if you're basically fit and not overweight, but you've not ridden a bike much, is general stiffness caused by working for a couple of hours a day in an unfamiliar position.

    With that said, my strongest advice would be for the first week or two to give yourself plenty of time and keep the pace fairly slow and steady (assume an average speed of around 15 mph). Avoid the temptation at least in the early days of attacking hills by keeping the gears low and staying in the saddle as much as possible. This way you'll limit the possibility of being wrecked, too sore and generally cheesed off with it all after the first week.

    You'll find distance is more important than speed which will come naturally, so if you can, find slightly longer routes once you're through the first week (via Oldford and Norton St Philip for example, or the Radstock Road to Faulkland and then to Norton St Philip, or through the - usually muddy! - lanes to Wellow). Different routes also help keep it interesting.

    Perhaps your biggest concern will be the Bath rush-hour traffic which will take time, care and confidence to fully master. Some of the rural roads can also be a bit of a handful at that time of the day too, so bear that in mind.My view is it's not particularly dangerous a long as you're paying attention.

    Good luck and stay with it!

    Thanks for that. I WILL definitely be taking my time and also be very aware of the traffic around me. Will always think ahead of the road. I have 'Mentally' prepared for stiffness and censored ache in the first week!! :x
    Wilier cento uno.
  • wheezeewheezee Posts: 461
    Pross wrote:

    Can't you just use Sustrans route 24 (Colliers Way)? I don't know it but it is apparently mainly tarmac surface with some on road and some virtually traffic free sections. Sounds like a nice commute.

    It's a bit of a long way round, as it goes via Radstock. Next year IIRC the Two Tunnels route will open, and provide a more or less flat route from Midford to Bath which may be a bonus.
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    Do a practice on saturday, then just do it.

    And read CycleCraft.

    At the very least, look at these from British Cycling.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • bluedoggy wrote:
    MrChuck wrote:
    Just do it, but don't necessarily expect to be doing it every day to begin with. Allow yourself plenty of time, don't go nuts, and just see what happens.

    My plan is to commute twice a week. The misses needs my home in a hurry on 3 of the days.


    nudge, nudge, :wink::wink: say no more, say no more
    All the gear, but no idea...
  • Mikey41Mikey41 Posts: 690
    Just do it, but as others have said, do a test run on a weekend to see just how long it will take. My commute is only 4.5 miles and the first time in took me 42mins (I allowed an hour). I was desperately unfit, but now I'm knocking that distance out in 20mins :)
    Giant Defy 2 (2012)
    Giant Defy Advanced 2 (2013)
    Giant Revel 1 Ltd (2013)
    Strava
  • Mr WillMr Will Posts: 216
    If you can, take you bike to work via other means first. This means your first cycle will be from work to home rather than vice-versa. No time constraints that way and you can just collapse on the sofa when you get in.
    2010 Cannondale CAAD9 Tiagra
  • edeweredewer Posts: 99
    I was of the same opinion. Went out with a mate for about 2 miles then just thought to hell with it, looked at google maps, planned a few routes and just got cracking. First ride was 18 miles and had a few nasty hills, but otherwise I've just kinda gone from strength to strength. I pity you having to ride round Bath though, what a hilly place!
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