Old Madone vs New Madone... Comparison

Cannock Chase
Cannock Chase Posts: 558
edited August 2012 in Road general
Totally hypothetical.
Assuming frames, wheels, groupsets etc have improved which I'm sure they have and new inovations get passed down through the line, where would Treks 2003 top of the range first Carbon Madone fit into the current Madone lineup? Would it still hold a high position or somewhere about middle, or even now be an entry carbon Madone?
I'm not getting old... I'm just using lower gears......
Sirius - Steel Reynolds 631
Cove Handjob - Steel Columbus Nivacrom
Trek Madone - Carbon

Comments

  • ugo.santalucia
    ugo.santalucia Posts: 28,230
    Totally hypothetical.
    Assuming frames, wheels, groupsets etc have improved which I'm sure they have and new inovations get passed down through the line, where would Treks 2003 top of the range first Carbon Madone fit into the current Madone lineup? Would it still hold a high position or somewhere about middle, or even now be an entry carbon Madone?

    Different decals and probably lesser wheels on the newer one.
    Since 2003 there hasn't been any technological advance worth considering, unless you want to consider an electric group set as an advance
    left the forum March 2023
  • ShutUpLegs
    ShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    Don't the later models have 'I LOVE LANCE' engraved on them :?:
  • nwmlarge
    nwmlarge Posts: 778
    is it pronounced "madoney" or "mad one" ?
  • styxd
    styxd Posts: 3,234
    "mar doo nay" isnt it?

    The newer frames will obviously be a fair bit lighter, with a bit more lateral stiffness plus a bit more vertical compliance to boot.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    styxd wrote:
    " more lateral stiffness plus a bit more vertical compliance to boot.

    I love that quote !
  • ALaPlage
    ALaPlage Posts: 732
    It is pronounced "Ma" "doh" "n". The "done" as in "cone" or "loan". From the town of Madone in France where the loveable Mr Armstrong had one of his many victories.

    Frame geometry has changed - I had the 2005 5.9 and now have the 2012 5.9.
    Also it has a different ride feel to it and would agree with Styxd. The frame feels stiffer yet also has enough flex in it over the bumps to make the ride more comfortable and less chattery than the older bike I previously owned. They have a different seat post set up too. Other than that it comes down to components. My old bike had Bontrager Racelite X wheels whereas the 2012 model comes with Shimano Ultegra Tubeless wheels.

    My old 5.9 weighed 7.2kg and the new one weighs 7.34kg. I put that down to the Di2 and wheelset. My old Madone was bought as a frame set originally and when I bought it it had Ultegra 6700 full group set fitted.

    Also the new stock Bontrager saddle on the 2012 model, the Affinity RL, is just a great saddle. After trying many saddles and fully expecting to have to change the stock one when I bought the bike I have been pleasantly surprised and amazed at just how comfortable it is.

    Love or hate "Big Brands", Lance Armstrong connection, being American it goes without saying Trek produce a great bike range. The Madone is great to ride and worth considering on anyones shortlist. :D
    Trek Madone 5.9
    Kinesis Crosslight T4
  • Tom Dean
    Tom Dean Posts: 1,723
    ALaPlage wrote:
    From the town of Madone in France where the loveable Mr Armstrong had one of his many victories.

    I think it comes from the col de la Madone, a climb near Nice LA used for training. La Madone = the Madonna.
  • ALaPlage
    ALaPlage Posts: 732
    Tom Dean wrote:
    ALaPlage wrote:
    From the town of Madone in France where the loveable Mr Armstrong had one of his many victories.

    I think it comes from the col de la Madone, a climb near Nice LA used for training. La Madone = the Madonna.

    Absolutely right.
    Trek Madone 5.9
    Kinesis Crosslight T4