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A bridge to far?

mikef32mikef32 Posts: 3
edited August 2012 in Commuting chat
Hi all,

Am looking at cycling to work again after a bit of a break from cycling - around about a year. Used to cycle to work, average of 3 x per week, 30 mile round trip. Considering starting again, this time will be in cycle scheme so looking at a decent road bike. Dilemma is this - is 39 mile one way, almost 80 mile round trip pushing what's realistic? Thanks in advance for advice.

Posts

  • SimonAHSimonAH Posts: 3,730
    I think the bridge to Far is near Smethwick?
    FCN 5 belt driven fixie for city bits
    CAADX 105 beastie for bumpy bits
    Litespeed L3 for Strava bits

    Smoke me a kipper, I'll be back for breakfast.
  • pastryboypastryboy Posts: 1,385
    Too far. In the best possible weather you're looking at at least four hours a day in the saddle. Add your working day to that and there's simply not enough hours left.
  • Kieran_BurnsKieran_Burns Posts: 10,052
    Drive in with bike, cycle home. Reverse and repeat.

    Two way too far to try

    (did you see what I did there? :wink: )
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • mikef32mikef32 Posts: 3
    cheers for the advice... confirms really what I was thinking. Driving in one way is a good idea.

    @kieran - v.funny :)

    so.. now which bike to get on the cycle to work scheme. Am eyeing up a ribble, boardman or wilier bike (as want to do some more with it besides rides to work.)
  • cyclingpropcyclingprop Posts: 2,426
    mikef32 wrote:
    cheers for the advice... confirms really what I was thinking. Driving in one way is a good idea.

    @kieran - v.funny :)

    so.. now which bike to get on the cycle to work scheme. Am eyeing up a ribble, boardman or wilier bike (as want to do some more with it besides rides to work.)

    The only way to know is to try. And don't limit yourself to your first thoughts either. Something you can mount a mudguard on might be sensible.
    What do you mean you think 64cm is a big frame?
  • Kieran_BurnsKieran_Burns Posts: 10,052
    and a rack - carrying your stuff for that distance on your back is going to be 'orrible.
    Chunky Cyclists need your love too! :-)
    2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5
    2012 Felt F65X
    Proud CX Pervert and quiet roadie. 12 mile commuter
  • daxplusplusdaxplusplus Posts: 627
    It's def possible but not sure about practical. Time is your enemy rather than anything else (as people have already said)

    Whats the route like? Basically is it fast? Or is it very hilly? Lots of stop starts?

    If it's pretty flat, doesn't have too many stops and your pretty fit then it may be practical (may have to buy a TT bike :shock: ) There are a fair few people that do commutes in the 50-60 mile range but not sure if many more are going any further.

    Any chance you can borrow a bike and just get organised, get up nice and early and just try it?
    Sometimes you're the hammer, sometimes you're the nail

    strava profile
  • veronese68veronese68 Posts: 22,788 Lives Here
    Why does far need a bridge?
    It's on the far side of the water.
  • well I was thinking about doing that kind of mileage as well, and tried it a few times, but it just tires you out after a working day as well, I have shorten the trip and now do around 25 miles both ways which isn't to bad, so you could drive halfway and commute quite easily.
    Sorry its not me it's the bike ;o)

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  • Paulie WPaulie W Posts: 1,492
    I commuted a round trip of 70-80 pretty hilly miles (depended on the route - the shorter was physically harder) for about 6 months. It was more like 5 hours on the bike than 4. I managed it for that long because I basically had no life. I was very tired a lot of the time. I wouldn't recommend it!
  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    mikef32 wrote:
    cheers for the advice... confirms really what I was thinking. Driving in one way is a good idea.

    @kieran - v.funny :)

    so.. now which bike to get on the cycle to work scheme. Am eyeing up a ribble, boardman or wilier bike (as want to do some more with it besides rides to work.)

    For that distance commute consider a Genesis Equalibrium as well, very comfy bike and quick when you need it to be......
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • mikef22mikef22 Posts: 14
    Thanks for the replies..

    Terrain: Lancashire Hills into urban areas, used to hill riding, commuted previously in similar area.
    Carrying stuff: @ Kieran. Will prob drive in, ride home / in day after and drive home. Carrying won't be problematic as work have space / lockers.
    Not a total fair weather rider, but I'll prob limit riding to work to spring / summer months and reasonable conditions weatherwise - the ride is totally road, so will a mudguard be any use or deadweight?

    Have just been to Evans. Sales bloke was promoting the pinnacle 4 (which just so happens to have offer on as well.) anyone any experience?
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    Evans get a big markup on pinnacle and I think it's their own in house brand!

    What was the budget? Guards are essential, especially over this distances but you don't need to pick a bike that has them, can always add crud catchers.
  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    Evans staff will recommend the bike that gives them most commission as will most salesman.... do your own research
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • mikef22mikef22 Posts: 14
    just been hunting around the forums and other sites for info on the pinnacle. As this is a big buy (for me) I'm not rushing it, so am doing some research. Have looked at Ribble's bike builder and can do the same spec bike for the same price (frame is Sportive 7005).
    Though how essential is a Shimano 105 set?
  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    knowing your budget would help us recommend.

    focus on finding something comfortable to ride

    focus on the frame as components can be upgraded.

    you'll be wanting to go on at test ride, ideally of similar distance to you commute.

    also also more expensive groups means more expensive parts which may not be ideal for a commuter doing distance in all weather.
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • SketchleySketchley Posts: 4,235
    knowing your budget would help us recommend.

    focus on finding something comfortable to ride

    focus on the frame as components can be upgraded.

    you'll be wanting to go on at test ride, ideally of similar distance to you commute.

    also also more expensive groups means more expensive parts which may not be ideal for a commuter doing distance in all weather.
    --
    Chris

    Genesis Equilibrium - FCN 3/4/5
  • iPeteiPete Posts: 6,076
    A good frame can be upgraded as parts wear out. Although it did take me 15,000 mile to wear out all my sora groupset to the point I replaced the whole lot. 105 is very nice but is it 5600 or 5700? The 5700 has internal cable routing on the handle bars which, as a tart, makes the bike much cleaner but its certainly not essential.

    Frame, wheels and a few carbon bits are essential personally. The right wheels and tyres can transform how a bike feels and a few carbon bits, especially seatpost, can really dampen road vibration and improve comfort.
  • mikef22mikef22 Posts: 14
    Budget - upto £900. Had a look at the Pinnacle, they are the 5700 version of the Shimano gears. The more I've thought about it today, the more I'm going to look elsewhere. Thanks for the advice so far.
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