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Pad Life

andy_welchandy_welch Posts: 1,101
edited July 2012 in MTB general
I'm used to road bikes where a set of brake pads last for years. So, since getting my MTB (Trance X2) in March I've not given the brakes (Avid Elixir 5) much thought. However, the one at the back was making a noise so I thought I'd pull the pads out and give them a bit of a clean. However, it turns out that I've not just worn the pad down to the metal I've even worn away a chunk of the spring type think that they sit in. I just worked out that I've "only" done 295 miles since getting the bike. OK, some of the trails I use have a mixture of peat and sand that are probably not to kind on pads and I guess it has been pretty wet, but that still comes as a bit of a shock.

Oh well, lesson leant I guess.

By the way, the front brake has always had a tendency to howl like a banshee when wet, so I guess that moving to sintered pads isn't really an option (unless I buy ear plugs) and I'll have to stick with organic.

Just ordered a pair of Avid Organic pads (with Aluminium backing plate) from Wiggle. £50 for front and back! This could get to an expensive game.

Cheers,

Andy

Posts

  • dmortondmorton Posts: 244
    Superstar components do 4 sets of pads for £18.... with a 45 day money back guarantee if you don't like them

    http://superstar.tibolts.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=21&products_id=29
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    organics for dry conditions. Sintered for wet conditions.

    and you can get through a set in a day easily.

    try Superstar for pads and keep a spare set in your back pack.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • estampidaestampida Posts: 1,008
    I would send them back

    sintered pads last a lot longer (similar compound to cars and motor cycle pads) - ebc make bike pads in the same red / green colours......

    and ebay or these guys for the cheapest

    http://superstar.tibolts.co.uk/product_ ... cts_id=136
  • WhipItWhipIt Posts: 52
    I also recommend Supeerstar sintered pads, should last a good few hundred miles, although pad life varies a lot. I don't get more than 400-500 miles out of mine, as an estimate - sometimes less.

    If the front brake is squealing, adjust the caliper mount bolts rather than going organic!

    Make sure you burn new pads in (ride with one brake on until VERY hot), this extends pad life.
  • .blitz.blitz Posts: 6,588
    andy_welch wrote:
    ... I've not just worn the pad down to the metal I've even worn away a chunk of the spring type think that they sit in.
    Tut tut :)

    Organic pads perform well but have a lifetime measured in tens of miles when conditions are bad. Sintered are not so good but they last a lot longer.

    Despite the above recommendations I have had nothing but niggling issues with Superstar's pads esp for Avids I've given them a fair chance but I'll not use them again.

    Wiggle are notorious robbers when it comes to consumables but Avid's aftermarket pads are most excellent your lbs will almost certainly be able to get them for less.
  • EH_RobEH_Rob Posts: 1,134
    superstar kevlars here, no complaints.
  • andy_welchandy_welch Posts: 1,101
    Thanks for the advice and links. At least it isn't going to cost me the best part of £50 every few months then.

    Not sure about taking a spare set with me on the trail though. It just took me an age to fit the new pads in the shed, let alone trying it on the trail. Mind you 90% of the time was spent trying to get the pistons on the rear to retract enough that I could actually get the wheel back on, Ended up having to open the bleed valve slightly so that a bit of fluid could be pushed out. But I dare say I'll get quicker with practice.

    Cheers,

    Andy
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    andy_welch wrote:
    Thanks for the advice and links. At least it isn't going to cost me the best part of £50 every few months then.

    Not sure about taking a spare set with me on the trail though. It just took me an age to fit the new pads in the shed, let alone trying it on the trail. Mind you 90% of the time was spent trying to get the pistons on the rear to retract enough that I could actually get the wheel back on, Ended up having to open the bleed valve slightly so that a bit of fluid could be pushed out. But I dare say I'll get quicker with practice.

    Cheers,

    Andy
    And that would have been because of a poor bleed at some time.

    Changing pads trail side is easy and simple. Yes some are easier than others. Pushing back the pistons is the first thing to do before taking the wheel out if needed. On others pistons in old out new in and squeeze. Sorted.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • dmortondmorton Posts: 244
    Can you not change the pads on Elixirs without removing the wheel? I'm sure I've done that.....maybe not :?
  • Chunkers1980Chunkers1980 Posts: 8,035
    Yeah you can. But in all cases I've found it much easier to do it with the wheel out, even if you have the option.
  • sigorman85sigorman85 Posts: 2,536
    I ride a lot of conditions and my pads still have life in them after 1165 miles there the ones that came with the bike ( specialized camber comp ) brakes ain't nothing special tektro Draco I think it's spelt like that. Not sure what pads are in there but there doing the job fine
    When i die I just hope the wife doesn't sell my stuff for what I told her I paid for it other wise someone will be getting a mega deal!!!


    De rosa superking 888 di2
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