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Top tips required to remove tight pedals

TheEnglishmanTheEnglishman Posts: 587
edited July 2012 in Workshop
I just got my bike back from a service and I was trying to remove the pedals - only I just can't get enough on them. They're on with anti-seize and I think the shop have done them up without accounting for the grease factor.

So, I've an impact driver (shimano pedals have a 6mm allen key on the inside 8) ) but am loathe to try it as I don't want to damage any bearings. I could try a rattle gun, if I know someone who'd let me have one for 5 mins, but I don't. I don't really want to go back to the shop for various reasons.

So, are there any top tips available regarding how to unscrew your pedals from the crank.

Posts

  • nax-iannax-ian Posts: 209
    A gert big spanner
    Finished
  • thistle_thistle_ Posts: 4,594
    Use the longest spanner you can find that fits the 'nut'. If you have the crank somewhere near 6 o clock you should be able to use both hands to push down as the crank won't need holding.
    You could also try a bit of steel tube around the spanner to give more leverage. Tapping it with a lump hammer might help.

    Also make 200% sure you're trying to undo it the right way :mrgreen:
  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,226
    Some pedals lack spanner flats so I guess your impact driver is the only way.
    If you can use a spanner, get a long one.
    Put the crank pointing forward/up. Put the spanner pointing rear/up. Apply both brakes and apply foot gradually to the spanner. Keep adding more weight taking care not to slip.
    Don't forget that the non-driveside uses a reverse thread.
  • xscreamsukxscreamsuk Posts: 318
    Do you have an old seat tube? Fit this around the allen key that goes into the pedal and you have a huge lever. Do not try with a carbon post though :-) Did this with an alloy tube to get my Looks off a few months ago.
  • seanoconnseanoconn Posts: 6,705
    If you're going to use a hammer on a spanner, don't hit the end of the spanner, it will just judder and fall off. Tap a bit closer to the nut.
    Pinno, מלך אידיוט וחרא מכונאי
  • paul_mckpaul_mck Posts: 1,058
    found myself in the same spot, removed the pedal flats and got some vice grips on the pedal spindle. pedals ruined but meh.
  • g00seg00se Posts: 2,221
    And for the love of you're knuckles, put the chain on the big ring before you start!
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    If they're really stuck you can take the crank off and fix it in a workbench; it's hard to get the requisite torque while trying to work around the bike frame.
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  • The problem I've got is that I can't see me getting the required torque on a 6mm allen key (I think it'll snap) It's not seized, as it only got put on 3 weeks ago, with anti-seize. And my trusty 15m spanner is too 'wide' so I'm left with thin pressed steel spanners that came with a bike tool kit and they're flexing under hand pressure. Hence I thought a rattle gun in the hex socket may work?

    I just don't see why they need tightening to 55nm when the thread 'does up' when you're pedalling, so it's never going to come undone? Or is my lack of knowledge showing here?

    Anyway - I'll admit semi-defeat and take the cranks off, put them in a vice and try some extension bars.

    I'm definitely pushing the opposite way to the 'Tighten' arrow on the pedal so I'm pretty sure I'm not trying to do them up!
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Ah, you'll never undo them with a tiddly allen key.

    You can grind down a good quality spanner to get it into the gap or borrow a pedal spanner if you know someone who owns one. If you use a normal spanner you'll still need to get a bar on it to generate the torque.
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  • Cranks off, bench vice, sorted!

    The halfords oik suggested a ring spanner. I thanked him and departed to talk to someone in a proper tool shop as opposed to talking to a proper tool. :roll:

    I take 10% off torque values when greasing up the threads - bad idea?
  • BozmanBozman Posts: 2,570
    There's no need to tighten them up too much because of the way they're threaded.
    I just put a bit of grease on the threads and lightly tighten, probably put more pressure on a carbon seatpost clamp.
  • cyclecliniccycleclinic Posts: 6,865
    IO do the same as the above. Sounds like you need a proper pedal spanner like the one park does and visit a different LBS in future.
    http://www.thecycleclinic.co.uk -wheel building and other stuff.
  • Wirral_paulWirral_paul Posts: 2,476
    I have a range of hex bit sockets for jobs like this (6mm, 8mm, 10mm). Easy to undo when you can lean on an 18" breaker bar.
  • Coach HCoach H Posts: 1,092
    I have a range of hex bit sockets for jobs like this (6mm, 8mm, 10mm). Easy to undo when you can lean on an 18" breaker bar.

    +1, but even easier with a 36" breaker bar :wink:
    If there is not enough leaverage with that, you are not getting it off without damage
    Coach H. (Dont ask me for training advice - 'It's not about the bike')
  • dennisndennisn Posts: 10,496
    Make sure that you KNOW which way to turn them to loosen.
  • DNQDNQ Posts: 45
    DO NOT slip and end up punching the chainwheel, people have lost fingers that way!
  • deswellerdesweller Posts: 5,271
    Cranks off, bench vice, sorted!

    The halfords oik suggested a ring spanner. I thanked him and departed to talk to someone in a proper tool shop as opposed to talking to a proper tool. :roll:

    I take 10% off torque values when greasing up the threads - bad idea?


    As you've noted, friction is an unpredictable element where screws are concerned.

    I would still err on the side of doing them up tightly; if there's enough movement then the axle precesses in the crank and can wear it away.
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