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Rear wheel pulling

hmmhmm Posts: 39
edited July 2012 in Workshop
Can anyone help me with a fairly basic problem. When I pull away and push down hard on the pedals the rear wheel gets pulled out of alignment by the chain pulling on the rear gears. I've tried tightening the quick release axle as much as I can but it still pulls meaning it rubs on the left hand side of the frame. What doesn't help is that the slots on the frame that the rear wheel slots into are at a fairly shallow angle, maybe 30 degrees. This means that the wheel has some adjustment, but it's a pain when you can't tighten it. Any ideas?
Triban 3 - very red
http://app.strava.com/athletes/780620

“Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.”
Henry Ford

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    make sure the axle is fully seated in the drop outs before doing up the Qr.

    what is the frame?

    and the Qr?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • hmmhmm Posts: 39
    The frame is an old 1989 Raleigh Kellogs pro-tour, ancient by modern standards. I wonder whether modern frames have a verical slot to stop the axle moving rather than a diagonal one. I believe the idea was that the wheel could be moved forward or back to vary the chain tension, however it's now twisting in the frame, with the side next to the gears moving foward but the other side staying put. I've no idea what make the quick release mechanism is, I'm assuming Raleigh...
    Triban 3 - very red
    http://app.strava.com/athletes/780620

    “Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.”
    Henry Ford
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    It might be time to change the Qr or look at another fixing device.

    It may b possible to make/find a chain tensioner of some sort?
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • andrew_sandrew_s Posts: 2,511
    nicklouse wrote:
    It might be time to change the Qr or look at another fixing device.
    You shouldn't have a problem if you have a good QR. That means a classic Shimano or Campag type QR with an enclosed cam, steel skewer and steel inserts in the cam housing and adjuster nut.
    Most of the light weight boutique QRs were only designed with vertical dropouts in mind, and don't grip nearly as hard.
    Cheap, Medium

    If that fails, you could check out chain tugs. You'd need to take considerable care, as most tugs are for track ends (rearwards facing dropouts).
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    andrew_s wrote:
    nicklouse wrote:
    You'd need to take considerable care, as most tugs are for track ends (rearwards facing dropouts).
    I agree with you on the Qrs but on the tugs I would say there are more out there for the dropout described as that is the most common dropout used with geared hubs. And just about all of them use tugs of some type. Ok the lower end shopping bikes may not but there are still a lot of bike using tugs.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • hmmhmm Posts: 39
    Thanks for the replies guys. I assumed all QR skewers were the same, not so evidently. I think an upgrade may be in order.
    Triban 3 - very red
    http://app.strava.com/athletes/780620

    “Whether you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.”
    Henry Ford
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    hmm wrote:
    Thanks for the replies guys. I assumed all QR skewers were the same, not so evidently. I think an upgrade may be in order.
    as mentioned Shimano or Campag dont bother with the over priced open type. hope etc.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
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