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Cento Uno ride quality

option_clickoption_click Posts: 169
edited June 2012 in Road buying advice
Long story short - I'm considering a Cento Uno to replace my Storck Absolutist.

The Storck is rather unforgiving for long days in the saddle. It's brutally fast and the handling is great, but the rigid all-out aggressive racing setup is rather tiring.

I've owned a Mortirolo for a few years and absolutely love it - it's a great fit and very comfortable.
Looking at the geometry between the Cento Uno and Mortirolo it's almost identical which is a good starting point.

Can anyone who may have owned/ridden both frames comment on similarities or differences?
I'd like a good balance between speed, stiffness and comfort.

Thanks in advance.

Posts

  • ilm_zero7ilm_zero7 Posts: 2,213
    yes, got both. but the Cento is an odd mixture of supple and stiff.

    and NOT the same geometry as the Mortirollo by a long way. much of the difference to me is the power transmission, and feel of the ISP

    I do have 'unforgiving' bikes, but the cento is first choice for a long ride..
    http://veloviewer.com/SigImage.php?a=3370a&r=3&c=5&u=M&g=p&f=abcdefghij&z=a.png
    Wiliers: Cento Uno/Superleggera R and Zero 7. Bianchi Infinito CV and Oltre XR2
  • option_clickoption_click Posts: 169
    Interesting - I looked at various geometry tables and the figs seemed similar.
    How would you say it differs from the Mortirolo? Longer top tube, shorter headtube etc..?

    Reassuring to hear that comfort levels are good, whilst still being responsive and fast.
  • ShutUpLegsShutUpLegs Posts: 3,522
    May be search on 'cento' threads :?:
  • giant_mangiant_man Posts: 6,878
    The Cento Uno is my fave riding frame next to a C59, great bike for all day riding imo ...
  • ajb72ajb72 Posts: 1,178
    I cannot compare my Cento to a Mortirolo, but I can compare it to a Cervelo RS which was always labelled as a long distance comfort bike. ILM has it spot on - the Cento is a stiff machine without doubt, but this does not translate to an uncomfortable ride by any means.

    Compared to the RS the bottom bracket, rear triangle and front end are all noticeably stiffer / sharper on the Cento, but somehow without sacrificing ride comfort. I suspect the ISP also plays some part in this - it gives you a feeling of being really connected with the bike but doesn't seem to transfer huge amounts of road buzz. I'm running mine on Fulcrum Zeros at the moment, so very stiff wheels. Still happy to ride for hours without fear of feeling beaten up!
  • thegreatdividethegreatdivide Posts: 5,428
    Same set up as ajb72 – it’s an absolutely amazing frame and it’s also one of the most pleasing to look at too which is always nice.

    Here’s a rather exited chap doing a really good review of the bike – he speaks the truth

    http://pelotonmagazine.com/Tested-Bikes ... deo-Review
  • northpolenorthpole Posts: 1,499
    I'd like a good balance between speed, stiffness and comfort.

    I can't comment on other Williers but in my opinion/ experience, the Cento Uno provides a superb mix of the three attributes you are looking for. I have a Spesh Roubaix Pro and use both bikes. When I got the Cento, my expectation was to be visiting the dentist more regularly to have fillings re-fixed! No need for such worries. The Cento is great all day and adds the bonus of great feedback, superb climbing ability in and out of the saddle and tremendous handling. More than my mediocre riding skills will ever need.

    Peter
  • bianchibluebianchiblue Posts: 344
    northpole wrote:
    I'd like a good balance between speed, stiffness and comfort.

    I can't comment on other Williers but in my opinion/ experience, the Cento Uno provides a superb mix of the three attributes you are looking for. I have a Spesh Roubaix Pro and use both bikes. When I got the Cento, my expectation was to be visiting the dentist more regularly to have fillings re-fixed! No need for such worries. The Cento is great all day and adds the bonus of great feedback, superb climbing ability in and out of the saddle and tremendous handling. More than my mediocre riding skills will ever need.

    Peter

    Peter - how does the Wilier compare to the Roubaix?
  • northpolenorthpole Posts: 1,499
    Feels much stiffer and more alive - just feels great all round to me. And yet it isn't full of road buzz over a long ride. The real stand out difference I noticed is the balance when climbing - in or out of the saddle it just feels right. The Roubaix by comparison on a steep climb feels like the weight balance is wrong back to front when out of the saddle. I'm not particularly strong but the power transfer pedals to transmission feels significantly more direct/ efficient on the willier. The roubaix is 58 and the willier xl. Hope that's of some help.
    Peter
  • bianchibluebianchiblue Posts: 344
    Thanks Peter. Which is more comfortable and by how much?

    Sounds like the Wilier feels faster and more aggressive.

    The balance-feel might be the massive headtube on the 58cm Roubaix putting your hands pretty high?
  • max1234max1234 Posts: 71
    I got my Cento Uno a couple of months ago and much prefer it to my Bianchi Infinito (which is sold as a long distance bike). I've noticed a huge difference in speed and climbing, not so much in terms of comfort. It feels far more direct and just seems to get up the hills so much more easily (I used a 11/28 rear cassette on my Bianchi, but don't need that on the Wilier as the power transfer is so much better).
    It's a great bike - absolutely no regrets about buying it.
  • northpolenorthpole Posts: 1,499
    bianchiblue

    Have to say I don't think there is such a thing as a comfortable bike - not a road racing bike anyway!!

    The overall reach on the Willier feels less than the Roubaix - I haven't checked the geometries, but it feels as though the Roubaix has a longer wheelbase. Because I'm not stretching as much I suspect I'm able to absorb more road buzz through the handle bars via more articulation in my elbows - not sure if this is correct - just a suspicion I have.

    The Willier does indeed feel faster but I would use the term fun rather than aggressive.

    Aggressive wouldn't really suit me - I damaged a lower lumbar disc a few years ago, hence the Roubaix when I started back. I've had no back problems with the Willier and I've covered many miles on it - a group of us rode up to Manchester from London a couple of weeks ago over three days, and I'm hoping to complete the Dragon ride this weekend.

    I suspect that the tall head tube on the Roubaix may have been off set by what feels like a longer reach - perhaps the way I have that bike set up has diluted the more relaxed geometry associated with its design.

    Chosing between the two in hindsight is so easy - Willier every time.

    Peter
  • balthazarbalthazar Posts: 1,565
    In reading this thread, I'm not sure if two things are being confused.

    For instance— if I bought a new bike, I'd make sure to set it up exactly the same as the outgoing one: the relative positions of BB, saddle, and handlebars are identical. That's because I know the position that my body should be in for the most comfortable riding, determined over years and miles. Are you suggesting that a replacement bike would put you in a different riding position? If so— is that not putting the cart before the horse?

    Otherwise, are you concerned with other qualities you perceive in the frame (which would be dimensionally identical to your current bike)? Bikes with the same riding position might have different geometry which causes different riding feel, especially out of the saddle. Beyond that, the dispute about frame materials and so on is where I bow out of the conversation or apologise for intruding on it.

    To put it plainly— is it your riding position you mean to change, or some other frame characteristic?
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