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Claud Butler bikes

dav3edav3e Posts: 46
edited May 2012 in Road beginners
Does anybody have any opinions on the quality of Claud Butler bikes, as I am riding an 'Elite' (2012) that I purchased as an introductory road bike (maybe too hasty at the time !!). I have replaced the not so good brakes, and fitted clipless pedals. Should I keep upgrading, or save for something better. ( I can only hope that by riding the CB, it will help if I do get something quicker/lighter in the future :wink: )

Posts

  • MichaelWMichaelW Posts: 2,226
    Once you have upgraded the wheels, transmission and finishing kit, all that needs to be upgraded is the frameset.
    It really isn't worthwhile. If you want something better, buy a whole new bike. Use the CB to figure out your favourite riding position, keep it as a rainy day bike or daily commuter or a backup machine.
  • NITR8sNITR8s Posts: 688
    I have a Claud Butler Echelon and have decieded to take it the other way, I am going to upgrade the components until I eventually buy a new frame. I will then take it to local LBS and get them to strip components and rebuild on the new frame. That way I can slowy build the bike I want.

    At the end of the day, getting a better bike is not going to turn you into a better rider. A pro on claud butler bike would still kick many peoples arses anyday.

    Its the rider, not the bike!
  • SicarioSicario Posts: 25
    NITR8s wrote:
    I have a Claud Butler Echelon and have decieded to take it the other way, I am going to upgrade the components until I eventually buy a new frame. I will then take it to local LBS and get them to strip components and rebuild on the new frame. That way I can slowy build the bike I want.

    At the end of the day, getting a better bike is not going to turn you into a better rider. A pro on claud butler bike would still kick many peoples arses anyday.

    Its the rider, not the bike!

    So why do riders pay every £1,000 to shed a lb off the bike weight? (Roughly)

    I hear what you're saying though.

    And I was looking at the Echelon for a starter bike for a friend, would you recommend against it? Is there more for the same money? (I can get at £500)
  • NITR8sNITR8s Posts: 688
    I paid £320 last year for the 2009 model, what you get is a fairly basic, heavy bike. You get similar if not better components than to an entry level Trek or Specialized. basic 2300 shifters, standard 53-39, 8 speed cassette 11-23T (i think), 12K weave carbon forks.

    So far I have upgraded the brake pads, stem and pedals.

    If I could turn back time, I would have paid more and gone for something a bit better possibly around the £600-700 mark. I certainly wouldnt of paid £500 for it. I would say for a begineer it is all you need but once you start understanding the different components you will soon want to get a better bike. It is much heaver than all my friends bikes (Cannondale(Cravendale), Scott, Trek, Giant)

    Getting a lighter bike will make someone really good go faster but the difference it will make to the average joe is so small it is not even worth considering. I personally think that the best upgrade you can get is top of the range tyres, the rolling resitance makes a huge difference.
  • dav3edav3e Posts: 46
    Funny you should mention the tyres, as I have acquired a couple of continental super sport (700x25 rather than 23), but I was going to save them for winter tyres. Would it be wise to change them now, and would a 25 be any better or worse than a 23 ?
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    £500 is too much. They can be had for under £400 if you shop around and even then I would say get something second hand for similar cash - that way you end up with maybe a £1000 - £1200 bike for the same money.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • smidsysmidsy Posts: 5,273
    25's are supposed to be comfier and have less rolling resistance so in theory better than 23's.

    I have run 25's through the winter and now have 23's on and TBH can't really notice any difference.
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • dav3edav3e Posts: 46
    I did only pay £300 (new) for the Elite, which didn't seem to bad overall, and on the whole it goes okay, but then I can't compare it to anything else !!
  • klepklep Posts: 158
    Its not all about weight ,although you definitely notice the difference in riding an 8kg or a 13kg bike, it's about overall smoothness. Higher tier components provide smoother riding, handling, braking and shifting which should result in a higher pleasure factor while riding your bike. (And watching it, cleaning it and showing it off)
  • leshereleshere Posts: 38
    Well I have often wondered. Often 10kg could be lost from the purchasers waistline at no extra cost (indeed some saving) I would be a prime example :oops:

    So why do riders pay every £1,000 to shed a lb off the bike weight? (Roughly)
  • snoopsmydoggsnoopsmydogg Posts: 1,110
    the money isnt always in the weight, extra money gets better quality materials and better components so you should get better long distance comfort/better power transfer etc.

    that being said i agree that there are lots that will rely on higher end bikes when a good diet and training will make a hell of a lot more difference for many of us.
  • AzharAzhar Posts: 247
    hello! i have the claud butler elite 2011. the only thing i did to the bike was get marathon plus tyres and clipless pedals. everything else is how it came. i've used it seriously for the past 2 weeks doing a 100 miles a week. before that it was more like 10-15miles a week. i've never had any problems with it. i hadn't done any cycling before i bought this bike so it was a more of an entry level bike before i moved on to somehting more fancy in a few years. but yea...great bike, never had any problems and likely to keep it for another few years
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