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Leave & Funerals

rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,128 Lives Here
edited May 2012 in Commuting chat
Quick question, little morbid.

If you have to attend a funeral of a relative (say, Grandfather), would you be obliged to take a day's annual leave to attend?

In my case, the relative is abroad, so if I were to attend it'd be two full days off.

Posts

  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 19,692
    Sorry for your loss matey, to answer your question it's covered under compassionate leave which would be rare for a company to force you to take it as holiday.

    I'm in the same boat myself, we also lost a family member on Sunday :(
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  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    edited May 2012
    Depends on your compassionate leave policy.


    And my condolences to both of you.

    EDIT: or not quite yet, but still, the thought's there.
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  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,128 Lives Here
    For the record, it's not a loss yet, but well, it's probably on the cards!


    Being in Holland and everything I just want to be a bit prepared.


    Sorry to hear that ITB.
  • mudcow007mudcow007 Posts: 3,861
    Yep, my work makes you take a days holiday
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  • tetmtetm Posts: 564
    Two days compassionate leave surely, but does depend on your contract of employment about whether you're entitled to it or not.

    "Many employers will have a scheme for compassionate leave and details should be included in your contract or company handbook. If the situation is not covered by any scheme then you can still ask your employer for the time off, although they do not have to agree to your request." - direct.gov.uk
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 15,309
    It'll depend on your workplace.

    Judging by posts you have made in the past I would doubt that your workplace has a 'compassionate' leave policy.

    Most places do. There may even be policy stating the number of days depending on how close a relative. Morbid isn't it?
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  • rick_chaseyrick_chasey Posts: 50,128 Lives Here
    Cheers TETM.

    Was just a worrying phone call from my mother y'day. "Your grandfather had a heart attack on Saturday".. Err, right, OK.

    He's 90, so a good effort all round. Big cycling fan innit ;). Probably the Giro got him over-excited.
  • roger_merrimanroger_merriman Posts: 6,147
    rather depends on the contract I guess.

    At the moment I'd sure i'd be able to wiggle it in as my days off. since i'm the golden boy at the moment.
  • gtvlussogtvlusso Posts: 5,112
    Firstly, condolences on your loss.

    Normally, I give 1 day for compassionate. However, in *some* circumstances where their has obviously been a huge amount of travel or heartache - I give a duvet day/WFH/make the hours up couple of days as a manager (i.e. keep your phone on, but we will cover you). Sometimes company policy does not account for 'where your heads at....' and I would not want people in the office who are obviously upset - the office policy would be 1 day in your case, but I would say 'make the hours up' (wink: wink....) or WFH (wink: wink....)
  • londonlivvylondonlivvy Posts: 644
    Sorry that you're needing to ask this :-(

    My company policy is one day for a grandparent and they were rigorous about it - my grandmother's funeral (some years ago) was in rural Scotland and it just wasn't feasible to do it as a day trip, so I had to take the second day as holiday.
  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    What the others said - in most large companies there'll be an official policy, but a decent manager should use their common sense and grant you the time off that you need. Even from a hard-hearted productivity perspective, this is probably the better option for the employer; employees who are happy and motivated are worth a lot...
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  • joenobodyjoenobody Posts: 546
    As others have said, a good manager will make sure you're well looked after. Mine recently sorted 3 days' compassionate leave (wife having c-section), and 2 weeks' paternity leave at full pay when the corporate standard only offered 2 days of paid paternity leave. He knows what I put in to the company and felt that what was on the table didn't reflect my commitment.
  • tailwindhometailwindhome Posts: 15,309
    joenobody wrote:
    Mine recently sorted 3 days' compassionate leave (wife having c-section).



    That's extraordinarily generous!
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    Believe in miracles
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  • joenobodyjoenobody Posts: 546
    That's extraordinarily generous!
    I agree :D
  • t.m.h.n.e.tt.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    I thought compassionate leave was for a close relative ie parent,sister,brother. But might be up to the employer and employment contract.
  • optimisticbikeroptimisticbiker Posts: 1,657
    As has been said, a good company doesn't look at the rule book. Rules are there for when people take the piss. When my Dad died after a long illness a few years back, I was told "take as long as you need", which was about 8 days in total. One of our team is off til June 6 because his daughter is ill. And another had to go to Oz for 4 weeks last year when his mum was taken ill of a heart attack and sadly succumbed. None of these were asked to take holiday or expected to 'make up the time'. Good, committed, staff are always recognised and supported.
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  • shouldbeinbedshouldbeinbed Posts: 2,732
    my sympathies RC and ITB. Depends on the size of your organisation as much as anything, I'd speak to you immediate bosses first to see if you can sort it out locally.

    I was told by our gargantuan HR department that my Grandmother wasn't a close enough relative to qualify for a compassionate days leave, they finished the call with "that's why you get an annual leave entitlement"

    My boss took my clock card off me the night before and swore blind he'd seen me at work on the day of the funeral.
  • DonDaddyDDonDaddyD Posts: 12,689
    edited May 2012
    (I managed 6 weeks paternity leave. A combination of holiday, Christmas, statutory paternity and a few days off during the lead up to having the baby).

    I have let the person go home when they told me they just found out that a relative has passed on. I then let them take the day of the funeral and the day after as compassionate leave. 2 days.
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  • tgotbtgotb Posts: 4,714
    I was told by our gargantuan HR department that my Grandmother wasn't a close enough relative to qualify for a compassionate days leave, they finished the call with "that's why you get an annual leave entitlement"

    My boss took my clock card off me the night before and swore blind he'd seen me at work on the day of the funeral.
    This is what should happen. HR department's job is to set the rules, and apply them (and in my experience, the rules regarding compassionate leave don't tend to be generous). A decent manager should then allow people to bend them to an appropriate degree; of course, what the manager deems appropriate will depend on the manager, and also on the employee's track record. An employee who goes the extra mile when there's a crisis at work, is more likely to receive sympathetic treatment when there's a crisis at home...
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  • essex-commuteressex-commuter Posts: 2,188
    Just looked up my entitlement...

    5 days paid leave for.....

    spouse, common law, same sex partner
    child or grandchild
    parent or grandparent
    spouse's parent or spouse's grandparent
    son-in-law or daughter-in-law
    sister or sister-in-law
    brother or brother-in-law
    other blood relations residing in your house
  • ApplespiderApplespider Posts: 506
    Ours is three days (per death) with more at a manager's discretion; so if someone loses a child or spouse unexpectedly, it's unlikely they're going to be able to come back into work after just 3 days.

    Totally agree with the 'rules are there to stop people taking the p' and that good companies will generally be more flexible - and should be regardless of their size. Mine has 75,000 employees and manages to stay reasonably flexible.
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