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New bike for Commuting - Specialized Crosstail

chiefinspectorchiefinspector Posts: 153
edited May 2012 in Commuting general
After much trying, i finally got my boss to agree for the company to join the cycle to work scheme. I would like a more suitable bike for commuting as i currently use an old Norco hardtail. The bike i am considering is the Specialized Crosstail Comp Disc.

I plan to take it for a test run on the weekend but I just want to know if anybody else has this bike and what their thoughts of it are.

Posts

  • jonomc4jonomc4 Posts: 891
    why not a road bike? It is much harder work on a MTB - or even a crosstrail? Forget what I say if you need to go cross country.

    I was shocked at how much a fast road hybrid was better than a MTB on the roads to work - and then shocked again in equal measure when I changed that for an ultra light road bike
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    How far is the commute?

    Anything over a few miles I'd suggest something like a CX or tourer. Basically a road bike, but with a nod to practicality: e.g. space for wide/spiked winter tyres, mounting points for mudguards and pannier racks.

    Seeing as you've got 2 decent mountain bikes it's not like you need your commuter to be a jack of all trades, so why the Crosstrail?
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • I did consider a road bike but the condition of the road on the way to work is quite poor so i was a bit concerned that the bike could be damaged. Sometimes it is hard to avoid the bumps, kerbs etc as passing cars restrict the room you have. My thinking was that the Crosstrail would be able to take the bumps.

    My daily commute is only 6 miles. I also wouldn't use a road bike at any other time as any spare time is spent mountain biking. I'm not clued up at all when it comes to road bikes so given these circumstances would it still be worth thinking about a road bike?
  • jonomc4jonomc4 Posts: 891
    I don't think it takes long to get clued up TBH.

    Also I hear that (provided you are not a brand snob) the Boardman CX from halfords is a really good bike for the money, I am going to look at one for a winter bike. It will be tough enough for the roads and you can use it all year round - it seems to be using Sram Apex long arm dérailleur so that will probably mean it have an 11-32 rear cassette spread. It is £899 new but being a Boardman - there are bound to be loads going second hand on eBay for half hat price.

    I would try a road bike if I were you - I think you might be shocked at the difference it will make - I use a fast road hybrid or a full out carbon fibre racer on the crappy, congested roads of London (where are roads not crappy?) with no issues at all - any good bike will take a good hammering on the potholes.
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    For 6 miles it's not so crucial. I'd still not choose the Crosstrail though. The crosstrail will be as good on the road as it would be MTBing.... :wink:

    Maybe a fast, road oriented hybrid if you don't want drop bars?

    Road bikes are built for the roads, bumps and lumps aren't an issue. A CX would be good, I'm pleased with my Boardman, very tough and I can truly use it all year round, in all weathers. I had a carbon Ribble road bike and whilst it was lovely to ride, it wasn't practical for a winter commute. In reality, it was only a minute or 2 faster than my 'slicked' CX over a 15 mile commute, so I've just got the CX now. Like you, the only road riding I do is commuting, the rest of my bike time is spent on the MTB.

    Also, given your comments about space on the roads I'd seriously suggest that you buy/borrow and read Cyclecraft by John Franklin.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • Thanks for the feedback guys. Looks like i'll be enquiring about some road & CX bikes tomorrow. I'm certainly not a brand snob but i can't choose a Boardman as the scheme we have at work doesn't cover Halfords. It's with Edinburgh Bicycle Cooperative but they do seem to have a good range of bikes. The limit is £1000 and i'm sure for that amount i could get something quite decent for all it will be used for. I have just had a look on the website and this bike seems to be worth a test run.

    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/specialized-tricross-sport-disc-12?bct=browse%2fbicycles%2fcyclocross-bikes
  • Godders1Godders1 Posts: 750
    I'd give this one a look too:

    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes

    Carbon fork and a better groupset (and almost 1kg lighter). That's quite a lot for the extra £100.
  • davisdavis Posts: 2,566
    Godders1 wrote:
    I'd give this one a look too:

    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes

    Carbon fork and a better groupset (and almost 1kg lighter). That's quite a lot for the extra £100.


    Yum. That's a hell of a head tube angle though!
    Sometimes parts break. Sometimes you crash. Sometimes it’s your fault.
  • extrusionextrusion Posts: 247
    Just a quick interjection. I have a crosstrail. I got the ltd version so it will have different bits on it but i think its great! And i commute 40 miles. The good thing about it is, you can put a wide range of tyres on it, from 28c to 45c. Mine came with dt swiss 458s so i can put 29er mountain bike tyres if i want to completely offroad. I can pootle about with the family on disused train tracks, i can ride to work at a very decent speed (got a few strava koms with it) and i have done some long distance weekend rides. I have also rode round in front of the house doing tricks in front of the kids ... :oops:

    Having said all that i still got a road bike after but now i have two bikes to choose between. if you already have a mountain bike then yeah get a road bike.
  • Godders1Godders1 Posts: 750
    davis wrote:
    Godders1 wrote:
    I'd give this one a look too:

    http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/product ... ross-bikes

    Carbon fork and a better groupset (and almost 1kg lighter). That's quite a lot for the extra £100.


    Yum. That's a hell of a head tube angle though!
    Pretty common on CX bikes.
  • I tried a couple of road bikes and was quite suprised at how well they cycle. I am seriously considering getting a road bike now after the recommendations from the earlier posts.

    To throw a spanner in the works, i have a 14 month old daughter. The missus thought it would be great if i was to get a child seat to go on the back of the bike so we can take her out cycling in the summer months. Would a road bike be suitable for a child seat?
  • bails87bails87 Posts: 13,317
    I think they attach to the pannier rack points, but you'd have to check.

    If so, then as long as it's got rack points then yes, you could.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • madtammadtam Posts: 141
    There are different childseats but the more common fitting is to pannier or mudguard fixings so abike with these is a good idea. I had a seat that fixed to the seat post only which worked for me at the time.
  • I'm going back to the LBS tomorrow night so will see what bikes have pannier or mudguard fixings that are suitable for a child seat. Hopefully will have chosen a bike by then.
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