Slippy Gatorskin

Cliveyp
Cliveyp Posts: 173
edited May 2012 in Road beginners
I went out last Saturday morning for a blast with a mate, the road was wet, although was no longer raining, and temps were pretty low (circa 6deg). On hitting my first junction and pulling on the brakes, the back wheel locked really easily and happily slipped a few inches towards the gutter. I'm running a Conti Gatroskin on the back wheel following repeated punctures on the standard Trek fit tyre earlier this year, and its only done around 10 dry miles since fitted. I understand that i'm going to see much less friction in the wet than dry, but i never noticed such a lack of grip on the standard Trek tyre. Is this the way its going to be, or is it likely that the release agent is/was still on it and not helping my case?

Although I can cope with it on the back, i'd be concerned if this is was the way it is and I finally get round to swapping the front over (I only changed the rear to see how I liked it before doing the front).
2015 Ridley Fenix 105
2012 Cube Ltd SL
2011 Trek 1.2 - Sold
2001 Giant Boulder - Sold

Comments

  • Kerguelen
    Kerguelen Posts: 248
    Cliveyp wrote:
    I went out last Saturday morning for a blast with a mate, the road was wet, although was no longer raining, and temps were pretty low (circa 6deg). On hitting my first junction and pulling on the brakes, the back wheel locked really easily and happily slipped a few inches towards the gutter. I'm running a Conti Gatroskin on the back wheel following repeated punctures on the standard Trek fit tyre earlier this year, and its only done around 10 dry miles since fitted. I understand that i'm going to see much less friction in the wet than dry, but i never noticed such a lack of grip on the standard Trek tyre. Is this the way its going to be, or is it likely that the release agent is/was still on it and not helping my case?

    Although I can cope with it on the back, i'd be concerned if this is was the way it is and I finally get round to swapping the front over (I only changed the rear to see how I liked it before doing the front).

    It might be the mould release compound causing this (the slidy stuff that helps the newly moulded tyre out of the machine at the factory). Roughening the tyre up a bit with a green scouring pad usually gets this stuff off. Out of interest, is the compound noticeably harder than on the other tyre?
  • Gizmodo
    Gizmodo Posts: 1,928
    Gatorskin are generally liked on this forum, I used an old pair and never had a problem, but you're not alone when it comes to new tires and wet weather:
    http://www.bikeradar.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=40020&t=12848308
  • itboffin
    itboffin Posts: 20,061
    Yep new gatorskins are slippery until they get a few miles on them after that it's all good, not that PF proof though.
    Rule #5 // Harden The Feck Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • racingcondor
    racingcondor Posts: 1,434
    I ran Gatorskins quite happily for a year before changing to GP4000S. I wouldn't go back, the difference in the wet is noticable and in my experience GP4000S don't puncture easily (don't last though compared to a Gatorskin but something has to give).
  • vorsprung
    vorsprung Posts: 1,953
    Gatorskins are great tyres but not so good at gripping in the wet
  • Bordersroadie
    Bordersroadie Posts: 1,052
    itboffin wrote:
    Yep new gatorskins ..., not that PF proof though.

    Mine have done 10 months, right through winter, all on backroads with farm debris, thorny hedge cuttings etc etc, about 3,500 miles, no p*****re incidents. I'd say they're very p-proof.
  • prawny
    prawny Posts: 5,440
    Gatorskins are hard as nails, itboffin is the p*ncture fairy's nemesis. They are a bit sketchy in the wet though especially when they're new, they're predictable though, I ran them for 2 years commuting with 2 unscheduled deflations the second one was because the tread was through to the canvass.

    GP4000s are better though, depends what sort of milage you're doing and whether you're happy paying the extra.
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • smidsy
    smidsy Posts: 5,273
    prawny wrote:
    unscheduled deflations.

    That has to be the cycling equivalent of the "Scottish Play" - brilliant :D
    Yellow is the new Black.
  • Cliveyp
    Cliveyp Posts: 173
    Thanks guys. I think i'll put these escapades down to the wet then. Cornering felt well planted, i dont think I treated bends any differently to my usual dry runs.......but I might do from now on.
    2015 Ridley Fenix 105
    2012 Cube Ltd SL
    2011 Trek 1.2 - Sold
    2001 Giant Boulder - Sold
  • prawny
    prawny Posts: 5,440
    My biggest slipping issues when I was on gatorskins was pulling away from junctions. Maybe lateral grip is fine but struggle in a straight line?

    Obviously my enormous power is an issue for them :P
    Saracen Tenet 3 - 2015 - Dead - Replaced with a Hack Frame
    Voodoo Bizango - 2014 - Dead - Hit by a car
    Vitus Sentier VRS - 2017
  • nickel
    nickel Posts: 476
    The main draw back with gators is that they do suffer from a lack of grip in wet conditions (imo). I've had the back step out a few times going through sharp slippy corners during the winter, so I just back off a little in the corners in wet conditions. But with 1 puncture in 2000 miles of riding with them it more than makes up for it.
  • I've always found gatorskins to be very good once scrubbed in - I don't ride much in the wet though. You always have to be careful in the wet anyway as water combined with any other contaminants, such as tree sap or diesel, will be a recipe for disaster with any sort of tyre.