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Cycling with a fused ankle?

BrassknockerBrassknocker Posts: 209
edited March 2012 in The bottom bracket
I was wondering if anyone has, or knows anyone with a fused ankle, and what effect it has on their cycling.

I have a 20 year old rock climbing injury (a pinned Pott's A fracture of tibia and fibula) and only recently it's starting to play up. I was told that I might have to have it fused before the age of 40, and that's creeping up on me.

I've given up running, and that's helped, and I'm now going into overdrive on the cod liver oil / glucosamine, arnica massage etc...

I guess if it was to be fused, it would effectively be fixing the talus to the tibia with the foot at 90 degrees? are there any other options?

Cheers

Posts

  • AggieboyAggieboy Posts: 3,996
    You need a 5amp not a 3amp.
    "There's a shortage of perfect breasts in this world, t'would be a pity to damage yours."
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    I have a fixed ankle. But mine is made of carbon fibre. It's helped my cycling no end.


  • AnonymousAnonymous Posts: 79,667
    Pokerface wrote:
    I have a fixed ankle. But mine is made of carbon fibre. It's helped my cycling no end.



    Serious question Pokerface, has your prosthetic been wind tunnel tested, etc ? Just wondering as I had no idea it was made of CF and I am aware of your palmares, Chapeau.
    Dave.
  • Pokerface wrote:
    I have a fixed ankle. But mine is made of carbon fibre. It's helped my cycling no end.



    Impressive stuff Pokerface, and congratulations BTW! That really puts my situation into perspective.

    How does it affect your right leg? I tend to ankle quite alot, but I'd guess that having the left side fixed has got to affect/determine saddle height, and pedal style, and therefore the motion of your right side?

    You obviously adapted your style (very successfully), but do you ankle with the right?, or have you adapted symmetrically, compensating by fixing your right ankle more than before and changing your style?
  • itboffinitboffin Posts: 20,035
    Sorry to hear about the ankle but can I ask how did it happen? many many years ago long before I cycled I was mad into climbing, have a few scrapes of my own, I loved the day I cut one of my fingers to the bone and had to go to A&E for stitches the docs had the get a pair of surgical pliers to pull the needle through my skin. :lol:

    @pokerface AWESOME dude ;-)
    Rule #5 // Harden The censored Up.
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.
    Rule #12 // The correct number of bikes to own is n+1.
    Rule #42 // A bike race shall never be preceded with a swim and/or followed by a run.
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Pokerface wrote:
    I have a fixed ankle. But mine is made of carbon fibre. It's helped my cycling no end.



    Serious question Pokerface, has your prosthetic been wind tunnel tested, etc ? Just wondering as I had no idea it was made of CF and I am aware of your palmares, Chapeau.
    Dave.

    Dave - this particular leg was designed with the help of an aerodynamics specialist. It uses a Kamm-tail design (basically cost the rear of the 'blade' off). It gives the same benefit as a longer bladed wing shape, but without contravening the 3:1 rule. The UCI doesn't specifically apply the 3:1 rule to prosthetics - but if someone were to blatenly break the rule, they might bring it in. I didn't want to be the one to break the rule.

    I have 2 different carbon legs. One is rounder and straight. My new race leg (in photo) is bladed. Hopefully, both will go in the wind tunnel this summer so I can double-check my position and the aerodynamics of both before London.
  • PokerfacePokerface Posts: 7,960
    Pokerface wrote:
    I have a fixed ankle. But mine is made of carbon fibre. It's helped my cycling no end.



    Impressive stuff Pokerface, and congratulations BTW! That really puts my situation into perspective.

    How does it affect your right leg? I tend to ankle quite alot, but I'd guess that having the left side fixed has got to affect/determine saddle height, and pedal style, and therefore the motion of your right side?

    You obviously adapted your style (very successfully), but do you ankle with the right?, or have you adapted symmetrically, compensating by fixing your right ankle more than before and changing your style?

    Short answer - is yes, I have adapted over time. On my prosthetic side I use a shorter crank arm to stop me being thrown to one side every pedal stroke. I also use Rotor Q-Rings (oval rings) as I have a big dead spot in my pedal stroke and the rings help greatly to eliminate that.

    If you end up with a fixed ankle - you will adapt and still be able to ride very well (over time). You just have to keep at it and be creative with how you fix any 'problems' that arise.

    I know guys that ride with their ankle fixed in a carbon-fibre sleeve (or boot) and they have no problems.
  • Thanks for the info Pokerface, you're quite an inspiration!
    itboffin wrote:
    Sorry to hear about the ankle but can I ask how did it happen? many many years ago long before I cycled I was mad into climbing, have a few scrapes of my own, I loved the day I cut one of my fingers to the bone and had to go to A&E for stitches the docs had the get a pair of surgical pliers to pull the needle through my skin. :lol:

    @pokerface AWESOME dude ;-)

    It was half my life ago now, but seem to remember I was attempting my first E3 lead on 'Comes the Dervish' in the slate quarries.... unsuccessfully, obviously. Another bad injury I have from those days was a dislocated (and later discovered, broken) shoulder from seconding the powerful crux of Kafoozalem at Bosigran... I miss those great days climbing (especially Lundy Island) but they took their toll on my body... I also slit my elbow to the bone sliding on ice in Switzerland ....sticking to bikes now... but still can't get around to selling my rack... one day I'll get out again for a long granite (but well protected) mountain route in the mountains somewhere...
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