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New Chainset Time

mikeyj28mikeyj28 Posts: 754
edited March 2012 in MTB buying advice
Hi all

I am in need of a new chainset as my current Deore one is on its way out. I got the Deore as i was short of cash and needed one pretty quickly to get my bike going again 18 months ago.

I am wondering whether i should stump up the cash for an XT one or get an SLX?

I want one that will last a half decent amount of time but also be light and good value. My Deore has served me well but seeing as i XC race it is a bit on the heavy side.

What do you all suggest for my 24lb HT?

Thanks
Constantly trying to upgrade my parts.It is a long road ahead as things are so expensive for little gain. n+1 is always the principle in my mind.

Posts

  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    What has worn out? Unlikely a lighter one will last longer.
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  • rockmonkeyscrockmonkeysc Posts: 14,774
    I have had SLX, XT, Saint & Deore. Deore is heavier but it's very strong, much cheaper & the rings last twice as long as the others. I wouldn't pay the extra for a higher spec crank again, though Saint do look very pretty!
  • Rob801Rob801 Posts: 43
    This probably belongs in "workshop & tech" but since you're talking about chains I thought I'd ask here instead...

    I've been reading maintenance tips while waiting for my new bike to arrive and I fell over this comment in some US bike shops "Mountain Bike Maintenance Guide"
    1. As more gears have been added to the rear ends of bikes, chains have gotten narrower. Now they wear out faster than in the past. Worn chains wear out rear cogs and front chainrings, but chains are less expensive than the gears, so you should frequently replace your chain. If you ride your bike six hours a week, expect to replace the chain two to three times per year in order to maintain crisp shifting and to avoid premature gear wear.
    Can that really be right? It appears that the OP has had his chain 18 months and on my last bike I rode pretty actively for a six month period before it was stolen (and it was 1.5 years old) and didn't feel like I needed to change my chain... I guess I just never considered the fact that a chain should be changed so often.

    Is there a rule of thumb?
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,804
    A lot of high mileage commuters swear by changing the chain before it wears the gears rather than after, some suggest having 3 chains so that by the time you've rotated them through (say 500miles between changes each - allowing you to deep clean the chain while riding with another) the gears front and rear and all three chains will be worn out at about the same time.

    Of course the bits of chains that wear (rollers and the bearing part of the side plates) are the same size as old 5 speed, it's only the side plates that have got narrower, so that bit is pure baloney.

    Simon
    Current steed - Whyte T129, 2013 frame, mongrel Revelations, Giant dropper, Stans S1 wheelset. 12, Magura Trail Sport brakes, 1x11. 12.8Kg
  • Rob801Rob801 Posts: 43
    Thanks. I hadn't thought of that... Rotating chains actually makes a lot of sense.
  • surreymtbsurreymtb Posts: 26
    Got 700 miles on my last chain/cassette - and yes I did clean and lube it :D but then I was but less know...a lard censored !!!! :oops: :P
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    Can that really be right? It appears that the OP has had his chain 18 months and on my last bike I rode pretty actively for a six month period before it was stolen (and it was 1.5 years old) and didn't feel like I needed to change my chain... I guess I just never considered the fact that a chain should be changed so often.

    I'm confused, is this about chains, or chainsets!? :?

    I've done the chain changing regularly, but IMO unless you have a top end cassette it really isn't worth it. 3 chains is more expensive than an XT cassette, I'd rather just run the whole lot into the ground and then replace the lot once a year. Have changed this year in a bid to save the (XTR) cassette for a second season, just changed and it's still skipping in one gear, annoyingly!
    Got 700 miles on my last chain/cassette - and yes I did clean and lube it

    Mine reach 0.75% after less than 300 miles usually, I'd not worry! I doubt I do much more than 1000 miles a year on the MTB and I had 4 chains last year.

    On the OP, the weight of Deore is mainly in the steel rings, fit aluminium rings to your existing cranks and you'll get closer to the weight of SLX or XT for less money. For racing why not consider a double set up, 28/40 or something, with TA Chinook rings which will save even more weight.
  • mikeyj28mikeyj28 Posts: 754
    njee20 wrote:
    Can that really be right? It appears that the OP has had his chain 18 months and on my last bike I rode pretty actively for a six month period before it was stolen (and it was 1.5 years old) and didn't feel like I needed to change my chain... I guess I just never considered the fact that a chain should be changed so often.

    I'm confused, is this about chains, or chainsets!? :?

    I've done the chain changing regularly, but IMO unless you have a top end cassette it really isn't worth it. 3 chains is more expensive than an XT cassette, I'd rather just run the whole lot into the ground and then replace the lot once a year. Have changed this year in a bid to save the (XTR) cassette for a second season, just changed and it's still skipping in one gear, annoyingly!
    Got 700 miles on my last chain/cassette - and yes I did clean and lube it

    Mine reach 0.75% after less than 300 miles usually, I'd not worry! I doubt I do much more than 1000 miles a year on the MTB and I had 4 chains last year.

    On the OP, the weight of Deore is mainly in the steel rings, fit aluminium rings to your existing cranks and you'll get closer to the weight of SLX or XT for less money. For racing why not consider a double set up, 28/40 or something, with TA Chinook rings which will save even more weight.

    Thanks njee for addressing my point.
    I changed chains twice in the last 18 months but the middle and granny rings are both knackered. As far as i was aware it would cost me agood few quid to change rings individually so i thought of buying a new chainset and selling the crank arms/big ring. Also while in the process reducing weight on my next chainset- hence the XT/SLX question.

    What decent rings could i buy that are lighter than what i have and won't cost the earth (any sites that i could buy from)?
    Regadring a double set up i would need new shifters and front mech too? How much harder is it climbing on long hard slogs with a double set up in comparison to a triple?
    Constantly trying to upgrade my parts.It is a long road ahead as things are so expensive for little gain. n+1 is always the principle in my mind.
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,804
    You don't need a new shifter for a double (the 3rd just becomes redundant) most front mechs also cope just fine, but occasionally people have an issue.

    Simon
    Current steed - Whyte T129, 2013 frame, mongrel Revelations, Giant dropper, Stans S1 wheelset. 12, Magura Trail Sport brakes, 1x11. 12.8Kg
  • Rob801Rob801 Posts: 43
    I'm confused, is this about chains, or chainsets!? :?
    I'm sorry, I misread the OP :oops:
  • njee20njee20 Posts: 9,613
    Regadring a double set up i would need new shifters and front mech too? How much harder is it climbing on long hard slogs with a double set up in comparison to a triple?

    I ran doubles for 4 years with standard triple shifters and front mechs and it was absolutely fine.

    You know what gears you can get away with, if you regularly use your absolute bottom gear it's probably not for you. If you go for a 28t inner ring you lose the easiest couple of gears. I've now gone to a single ring for racing and find it great, only a couple of races this year I'd have taken an easier gear if it was available, and even then I've not walked any climbs, you just dig a bit deeper if there's no alternative. It's fine when just riding.
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