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Is Standover clearance really important?

TheWobblyTheWobbly Posts: 3
edited March 2012 in MTB beginners
Hey guys, I hate to ask a question that's probably been done to death but I need a little re-assurance. I just picked up a 2010 Rockhopper SL Comp for a steal and I really love the bike but I'm worried about the lack of standover clearance I have. I'm 6"1 and I plumped for a 21" frame, in all respects it fits me perfectly but I have less than an inch of clearance. After lots of Googling I'm baffled as for every result that says I need anywhere from 1 to 3 inches of clearance I'll find an equal number that say it's unimportant. Somebody tell me everything will be alright :)

Posts

  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    Seen the topic in general?

    In a word No. But that bike may be to big for you. But again it might not be.

    Standover is the least important thing.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • Cheers nick. I'll take it for a thrash this weekend and see how it goes.
  • CubistCubist Posts: 73
    Im fairly sure that its not so much having MASSES of clearance so much as having ADEQUATE clearance. If you stop gently and slowly and jump off onto your feet, do your nuts hit the crossbar? If not, great. If yes - imagine how thats gonna feel if you have to stop quickly!!!
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    Nope you don't need any clearance.

    In fact if you are about 175cm or less on a bike with 100mm of travel or more you lose all clearance on most bikes.

    But who says you need both feet on the floor? No one.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • CubistCubist Posts: 73
    nicklouse wrote:
    Nope you don't need any clearance.

    In fact if you are about 175cm or less on a bike with 100mm of travel or more you lose all clearance on most bikes.

    But who says you need both feet on the floor? No one.

    Who says it? Both feet on the floor when stood over the crossbar? Well certainly not "No one"! :lol: - its one of the most common pieces of advice ive heard/been given/plastered all over the internet. But that doesnt mean im saying its right or wrong. But CERTAINLY not "No one" says it! :lol: As for the 100mm travel statement... im guessing THATS why such high standover is recommended by so many.

    Just went over onto this topic on 'general' and it looks pretty much like a landslide victory in favour of a decent bit of standover. Oh god, im hoping people dont suffer from "frame envy" on this forum! Big isnt always best! lol
  • pilchpilch Posts: 1,136
    Been frame shopping recently & came to the same conclusion the important bit was the riding position, couldn't get the right fit without being tight on the standover...

    As I intend to be riding it more than standing astride it gassing at the side of the trail, I went for the fit
    A berm? were you expecting one?

    29er race

    29er bouncer
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    Cubist wrote:
    nicklouse wrote:
    Nope you don't need any clearance.

    In fact if you are about 175cm or less on a bike with 100mm of travel or more you lose all clearance on most bikes.

    But who says you need both feet on the floor? No one.

    Who says it? Both feet on the floor when stood over the crossbar? Well certainly not "No one"! :lol: - its one of the most common pieces of advice ive heard/been given/plastered all over the internet. But that doesnt mean im saying its right or wrong. But CERTAINLY not "No one" says it! :lol: As for the 100mm travel statement... im guessing THATS why such high standover is recommended by so many.

    Just went over onto this topic on 'general' and it looks pretty much like a landslide victory in favour of a decent bit of standover. Oh god, im hoping people dont suffer from "frame envy" on this forum! Big isnt always best! lol

    I will again repeat it. Sandover is irellavant. back in the good old days when suspension was not invented and the top tubes were horizontal and frames were just like drop bar bikes then stand over was still the rule as was the sadle to stem distance.

    then came suspension and at first the front of the bike was only lifted by a couple of inches. but then it became 4" and more. Opps there is all the "standover clearance" GONE.

    it is something that really needs to be forgotten as it is rare to get a bike that fits and has "standover".

    most of my bikes dont have any clearance. Oh the BMX and the 24" park bike and the roadie bike do. but the rest. touching to none. and they ARE the right size but as implied I am 175cm.

    PS do n ot get onto hydroforming for adding clearance.
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • The RookieThe Rookie Posts: 27,747
    With Nick on this, typical "It's all over the internet so it must be true" poor research (try seeing how many of those are ignorant copy and pastes anyway!) standover on an MTB is irrelevant, I don't usually ride with both feet on the ground - do you?

    I couldn't even tell you if I had any standover clearnace on mine or not, but as it's a short travel HT the answer is 'probably some'!

    Simon
  • ThewaylanderThewaylander Posts: 8,767
    I wouldn't say that totally,

    It was highly relevant when i rode trials, in fact if i hadn't had a low stand over height I'd ahve no nuts left... fairly literally :P
  • nicklousenicklouse Posts: 81,520 Lives Here
    I wouldn't say that totally,

    It was highly relevant when i rode trials, in fact if i hadn't had a low stand over height I'd ahve no nuts left... fairly literally :P
    But in the old days Mr Ray and Co used the same bike for everything. But yes certain types of bikes have certain design requirements as I pointed out re the BMX etc.

    ;)
    "Do not follow where the path may lead, Go instead where there is no path, and Leave a Trail."
    Parktools :?:SheldonBrown
  • ThewaylanderThewaylander Posts: 8,767
    nicklouse wrote:
    I wouldn't say that totally,

    It was highly relevant when i rode trials, in fact if i hadn't had a low stand over height I'd ahve no nuts left... fairly literally :P
    But in the old days Mr Ray and Co used the same bike for everything. But yes certain types of bikes have certain design requirements as I pointed out re the BMX etc.

    ;)

    They indeed indeed, as did I, and i bet they discovered as i did lower was better cos our gonads hurt :p

    But yeh your right, :)
  • CubistCubist Posts: 73
    With Nick on this, typical "It's all over the internet so it must be true" poor research (try seeing how many of those are ignorant copy and pastes anyway!) standover on an MTB is irrelevant, I don't usually ride with both feet on the ground - do you?

    I couldn't even tell you if I had any standover clearnace on mine or not, but as it's a short travel HT the answer is 'probably some'!

    Simon

    To be fair, I was merely commenting that the statement "...who says you need both feet on the floor? No one." wasnt actually true in any sense. And that there are a great many people who DO say exactly that.
    Its very easy to type something as though its a fact rather than just an opinion - its a bad habit to get into. Personally, I like a bit of standover - as do, it seems, a great many people if the posts in the general forum are anything to go by - or is this forum "typical "Its all over the internet so it must be true" poor research" too? :shock: :wink:
  • mcnultycopmcnultycop Posts: 2,143
    I don't have enough standover clearance, I had to bail on a rocky bit at Lee this morning and I really winced. I will have more in future.
  • No standover clearance for me in three years of mtbing. It has never been an issue for me but then perhaps when I do come off I do not do so neatly and slowly, moving very gently forward. I could be weird but with me offs are over the bars or off the side, never a gentle lollop over the nose of the saddle.
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