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Where your money goes

themekonthemekon Posts: 197
edited February 2012 in The bottom bracket
Proof if any was needed that where local authorities are concerned the lunatics are still running the asylum. In my local rag this week two articles stand out. The first is a workshop puppet show called Lunch at Boobies featuring a puppet and a hand knitted breast ran by BRAS (Breastfeeding Reassurance And Support) to teach expectant parents about breastfeeding. The other article is about a workshop for Gay,Lesbian,bisexual and transgender school children to attend to discuss their sexuality. Its good to know that in these ever austere times when services are being slashed for the genuinely needy and council care homes are being sold off to private investors the council tax payers can rest easy knowing their payments are put to such good use.

Is it me ?

Posts

  • themekon wrote:
    Is it me ?
    Nope, this has always been the way of the beast.
    You only threaten to cut what's going to get the voting population up in arms about, the gravy train continues to flow and the lefties continue to get their favourite "isms" funded.
    Remember that you are an Englishman and thus have won first prize in the lottery of life.
  • Frank the tankFrank the tank Posts: 6,553
    edited February 2012
    Gay,lesbian,bi-sexual and transgender school children.

    Firkin' 'ell do me a favour, there was none of that baloney in my school 34years ago, but then again it was a state school, we couldn't afford owt out the ordinary.

    If you were gay it meant you were happy.
    If you were lesbian, that's somewhere in the middle east.
    If you were bi-sexual it was because you couldn't get it for free.
    As for transbloodygender that hadn't even been invented.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • themekon wrote:
    Is it me ?
    Nope, this has always been the way of the beast.
    You only threaten to cut what's going to get the voting population up in arms about, the gravy train continues to flow and the lefties continue to get their favourite "isms" funded.

    I beg to differ, when it comes to cut backs it's usually the minority groups that suffer first.

    Some years ago (when my lad was going through school) every review they were endevouring to cut back on "special needs" pupils budget. They were very reluctant to cut back on the things that affected the majority of the pupils.

    I understand the sentiments of the OP and I often wonder how some of these pet projects are given any kind of credence let alone funding.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • cooldadcooldad Posts: 32,599
    What's wrong with boobs. I'd like to see that puppet show.
    I don't do smileys.

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  • Gay,lesbian,bi-sexual and transgender school children.

    Firkin' 'ell do me a favour, there was none of that baloney in my school 34years ago, but then again it was a state school, we couldn't afford owt out the ordinary.

    If you were gay it ment you were happy.
    If you were lesbian, that's somewhere in the middle east.
    If you were bi-sexual it was because you couldn't get it for free.
    As for transbloodygender that hadn't even been invented.


    Frank...the country's gone 'T*t's up mate...from when we where at school and I been left 50yrs
  • RonBRonB Posts: 3,984
    http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Guardian/documents/2008/09/12/13.09.08.Public.spending.pdf

    Bit out of date, but the relative size of spending probably won't have changed all that much.
  • GiraffotoGiraffoto Posts: 2,078
    One thing that philosophers, writers and thinkers have agreed on since time immemorial: that the whole world's going to pot right here and now and it was so much better 50 years ago. (about 50 years ago, by the way, our politicians who were so much better then were begging the French to let us join the EU, and being told "non!")
    Specialized Roubaix Elite 2015
    XM-057 rigid 29er
  • It reminds me of that time in the 80's when harringay council banned the tufty club , as they felt that ethnic minorities could not identify with a squirell .
    Britannia waives the rules
  • cooldad wrote:
    What's wrong with boobs. I'd like to see that puppet show.


    hehe Smutty and Sweep. :D
    The dissenter is every human being at those moments of his life when he resigns
    momentarily from the herd and thinks for himself.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Gay,lesbian,bi-sexual and transgender school children.

    Firkin' 'ell do me a favour, there was none of that baloney in my school 34years ago, but then again it was a state school, we couldn't afford owt out the ordinary.

    If you were gay it meant you were happy.
    If you were lesbian, that's somewhere in the middle east.
    If you were bi-sexual it was because you couldn't get it for free.
    As for transbloodygender that hadn't even been invented.


    Well thank god we've actually moved on from 34 year ago and as a gay man, thank god I wasn't an older school kid then!

    As straight blokes, I'm sure you see no benefit to any of this but it genuinely does help some people. In the 80s when I was at school and discovering my sexuality, there was nothing... I got through it and although I don't look back on my school days with nostalgia particularly, it wasn't that bad, however at the time I felt very isolated at times.

    All my friends were discovering girls and I tried to go along with it. Through my teens and into my early 20s I tried to train myself to notice pretty girls when I was with my mates. I had girlfriends in the hope that something would click and I wouldn't be gay, but eventually you get to a point where maturity and self confidence takes over and you realise that you're just being stupid not being yourself and doing what comes naturally to yourself. Why should it be like that? It's absolutely ridiculous that someone should feel they have to push them to be something they're not! At times as a 15, 16 year old gay lad in the 80s I seriously felt like I may be the "only gay in the village" so to speak and it felt very lonely. As I said, my school days weren't that bad, I can't say that I was bullied and left out of everything, but at the same time I felt I was forced to keep my feelings hidden deep, deep inside. If there had been someone to speak to, someone to explain to me the situation when it felt like the whole of society wanted me to be something I wasn't , things may have been just that bit better.

    Rubbishing things like this is akin to saying "bloody disabled people, they should just make an effort and get out of those taxpayer funded wheelchairs and get a bloody job".... I'm not having a go, I'm sure you're all lovely people but try empathising once in a while, step out of that box and wonder to yourself how it is for people who do not fit into that standard slot that society has defined for them.
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
  • Gay,lesbian,bi-sexual and transgender school children.

    Firkin' 'ell do me a favour, there was none of that baloney in my school 34years ago, but then again it was a state school, we couldn't afford owt out the ordinary.

    If you were gay it meant you were happy.
    If you were lesbian, that's somewhere in the middle east.
    If you were bi-sexual it was because you couldn't get it for free.
    As for transbloodygender that hadn't even been invented.


    Well thank god we've actually moved on from 34 year ago and as a gay man, thank god I wasn't an older school kid then!

    As straight blokes, I'm sure you see no benefit to any of this but it genuinely does help some people. In the 80s when I was at school and discovering my sexuality, there was nothing... I got through it and although I don't look back on my school days with nostalgia particularly, it wasn't that bad, however at the time I felt very isolated at times.

    All my friends were discovering girls and I tried to go along with it. Through my teens and into my early 20s I tried to train myself to notice pretty girls when I was with my mates. I had girlfriends in the hope that something would click and I wouldn't be gay, but eventually you get to a point where maturity and self confidence takes over and you realise that you're just being stupid not being yourself and doing what comes naturally to yourself. Why should it be like that? It's absolutely ridiculous that someone should feel they have to push them to be something they're not! At times as a 15, 16 year old gay lad in the 80s I seriously felt like I may be the "only gay in the village" so to speak and it felt very lonely. As I said, my school days weren't that bad, I can't say that I was bullied and left out of everything, but at the same time I felt I was forced to keep my feelings hidden deep, deep inside. If there had been someone to speak to, someone to explain to me the situation when it felt like the whole of society wanted me to be something I wasn't , things may have been just that bit better.

    Rubbishing things like this is akin to saying "bloody disabled people, they should just make an effort and get out of those taxpayer funded wheelchairs and get a bloody job".... I'm not having a go, I'm sure you're all lovely people but try empathising once in a while, step out of that box and wonder to yourself how it is for people who do not fit into that standard slot that society has defined for them.

    Thanks for the lecture but I personally don't need one.

    I have a nephew that is homosexual and he went through a similar experience to yourself,trying to be hetrosexual. Going out with girls eventually,he had to face his reality. It didn't end at coming out for him he developed a drink problem and attempted suicide (had six weeks in ITU after chucking himself out of a second story window) He's now off the booze and in a long term relationship.
    What I will say is, a very natural part of growing up is admiration of peers of the same sex isn't unusual and this cancause an adolescent to be a bit confused. While I have no problem with such a person seeking advice, what would be wrong is if a party with an agenda was offering the advice.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • HeadhuunterHeadhuunter Posts: 6,494
    Gay,lesbian,bi-sexual and transgender school children.

    Firkin' 'ell do me a favour, there was none of that baloney in my school 34years ago, but then again it was a state school, we couldn't afford owt out the ordinary.

    If you were gay it meant you were happy.
    If you were lesbian, that's somewhere in the middle east.
    If you were bi-sexual it was because you couldn't get it for free.
    As for transbloodygender that hadn't even been invented.


    Well thank god we've actually moved on from 34 year ago and as a gay man, thank god I wasn't an older school kid then!

    As straight blokes, I'm sure you see no benefit to any of this but it genuinely does help some people. In the 80s when I was at school and discovering my sexuality, there was nothing... I got through it and although I don't look back on my school days with nostalgia particularly, it wasn't that bad, however at the time I felt very isolated at times.

    All my friends were discovering girls and I tried to go along with it. Through my teens and into my early 20s I tried to train myself to notice pretty girls when I was with my mates. I had girlfriends in the hope that something would click and I wouldn't be gay, but eventually you get to a point where maturity and self confidence takes over and you realise that you're just being stupid not being yourself and doing what comes naturally to yourself. Why should it be like that? It's absolutely ridiculous that someone should feel they have to push them to be something they're not! At times as a 15, 16 year old gay lad in the 80s I seriously felt like I may be the "only gay in the village" so to speak and it felt very lonely. As I said, my school days weren't that bad, I can't say that I was bullied and left out of everything, but at the same time I felt I was forced to keep my feelings hidden deep, deep inside. If there had been someone to speak to, someone to explain to me the situation when it felt like the whole of society wanted me to be something I wasn't , things may have been just that bit better.

    Rubbishing things like this is akin to saying "bloody disabled people, they should just make an effort and get out of those taxpayer funded wheelchairs and get a bloody job".... I'm not having a go, I'm sure you're all lovely people but try empathising once in a while, step out of that box and wonder to yourself how it is for people who do not fit into that standard slot that society has defined for them.

    Thanks for the lecture but I personally don't need one.

    I have a nephew that is homosexual and he went through a similar experience to yourself,trying to be hetrosexual. Going out with girls eventually,he had to face his reality. It didn't end at coming out for him he developed a drink problem and attempted suicide (had six weeks in ITU after chucking himself out of a second story window) He's now off the booze and in a long term relationship.
    What I will say is, a very natural part of growing up is admiration of peers of the same sex isn't unusual and this cancause an adolescent to be a bit confused. While I have no problem with such a person seeking advice, what would be wrong is if a party with an agenda was offering the advice.

    Well that's a sad story, thankfully he's pulled through. Perhaps with proper support he wouldn't have got into that situation in the 1st place? %Think prevention rather than cure. It sounds like your main point of opposition to support like this is not the expense to the taxpayer but the potential for these centres to be used to groom impressionable youngsters? Although you seem to have experience of the suffering which can result from someone feeling excluded from their immediate peer group you don't have any experience of these centres themselves obviously! People who work with kids and young people (teachers, Cub and Scout leaders etc) have to go through endless vetting procedures (of course this wasn't the case 34 years ago). In any case, most of the people/volunteers at centres like this are only in their early 20s themselves, so not a lot older than the teens who may need advice themselves. I think they're largely designed to be peer on peer advice centres. Things have moved on a lot in 34 years and it's not all "political correctness gawn maaaad"....
    Do not write below this line. Office use only.
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