Winter to Summer Switch...

Muffintop
Muffintop Posts: 296
edited March 2012 in Road beginners
I have two road bikes, one for best/summer the other for the winter and mooching.

With the better weather coming in should I change over now or wait? I'm doing the Etape Caledonia and I only got the best bike a week before I did it last year.

When would you guys move over?

Mx
FCN: Brompton: 12, Tourer: 7, Racer: 4

http://www.60milestonod.blogspot.com
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Comments

  • jim453
    jim453 Posts: 1,360
    Why don't you do it whenever you want to.
  • pilot_pete
    pilot_pete Posts: 2,120
    Do you really need to ask? Crap weather, take out the winter bike. Sunny and dry, use the summer bike. Surely that isn't too difficult? :wink:

    PP
  • sungod
    sungod Posts: 16,864
    i ride the shiny bike year round, for the last few years summers seem to be wetter than winters anyway

    ok, i'm not riding if it's icy, but otherwise as long as i hose off any salt/cack it's fine

    imho every day i'm not riding it is a day i'll never ride it, i'd rather enjoy things
    my bike - faster than god's and twice as shiny
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    As you are obviously in need of assistance here are some possible ways to choose:

    1. When the clocks go forward.
    2. Check the forecast for rain.
    3. Toss a coin (not easy for those with 3 bikes all wanting some lurve).
    4. Alternate between them on each week or ride so neither feels left out.
    5. Ask your next door neighbour. They probably think you're weird already but it will remove any doubt.
    5. Ride the bike you like riding most every time and quit caring. Wear it out, that's what it's for.

    Is that enough?
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • Hrmm...

    All good points, could pick favourites but I don't want to make anyone jealous. The reason I'm asking is that the winter one is about 7lb heavier than the 'for best' without the basket rack on it (it has a basket rack on it right now). Am I gaining anything by dragging that up hills and down dells and then switching it closer to the Etape, or should I be doing that now and sod any gain?

    Mx
    FCN: Brompton: 12, Tourer: 7, Racer: 4

    http://www.60milestonod.blogspot.com
  • DavidJB
    DavidJB Posts: 2,019
    Muffintop wrote:
    Hrmm...

    All good points, could pick favourites but I don't want to make anyone jealous. The reason I'm asking is that the winter one is about 7lb heavier than the 'for best' without the basket rack on it (it has a basket rack on it right now). Am I gaining anything by dragging that up hills and down dells and then switching it closer to the Etape, or should I be doing that now and sod any gain?

    Mx

    Yes, you're getting fitter and when you switch you'll fly up hills.
  • amaferanga
    amaferanga Posts: 6,789
    DavidJB wrote:
    Muffintop wrote:
    Hrmm...

    All good points, could pick favourites but I don't want to make anyone jealous. The reason I'm asking is that the winter one is about 7lb heavier than the 'for best' without the basket rack on it (it has a basket rack on it right now). Am I gaining anything by dragging that up hills and down dells and then switching it closer to the Etape, or should I be doing that now and sod any gain?

    Mx

    Yes, you're getting fitter and when you switch you'll fly up hills.

    He's only getting fitter if he's putting in more effort! If he rides at the same effort on the heavier bike and therefore slower then it'll make chuff all difference.
    More problems but still living....
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    Lose 7lb off yourself, switch bikes and that's a whole stone (6kg+) lost for free.

    http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=help+m ... +decisions
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • I might stave it off the next couple of weeks then, to the beginning/mid april. I've also started wearing my heart monitor out so I'll be able to measure how much effort I'll be putting in as well.

    I'm also not the type to forgo cake (I'm having a cream donut right now - nomnomnomnom) so I'm going to be satisfied with the 7lb loss.

    Mx
    FCN: Brompton: 12, Tourer: 7, Racer: 4

    http://www.60milestonod.blogspot.com
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    I have a question (forgive me, I'm new to this, but this is road beginners, right...)
    Why does everyone have a winter bike and a summer bike? I've spent loads money on a nice bike and i want to ride it all the time. Am I not allowed out on it if it's cold/raining/cloudy/windy/bad light ?
    Is it just because you put different tyres on ? why not just get spare wheels ?
    Is it because the nasty weather might spoil your 'summer' bike ? surely they are not that fragile are they ?
    If a bit wears out, replace it with a better one and crack on.
    Or is it just about having more bikes? :wink:

    Sorry if this a really dumb question, I know it seems to be the convention, i'm just interested
  • DonutDad wrote:
    I have a question (forgive me, I'm new to this, but this is road beginners, right...)
    Why does everyone have a winter bike and a summer bike?

    DD, the main reasons many people have a winter bike are

    1. The "best bike", used almost only in dry weather will last a lot longer and need maintenance/cleaning/lubricating less frequently.

    2. In winter, mudguards are essential to avoid soaking wet freezing cold feet, and to protect the front/rear derailleurs/chain and so forth getting caked with salty, dirty stuff off the road. Not to mention the dirty wet stripe up your back! "Best bikes" generally cannot fit proper full length guards because the frames have close clearances around wheels/brakes.

    3. Slightly wider tyres are better in winter to afford better grip on wet roads - see clearance issue above.

    4. Yes, it's a little bit about having two bikes! There's a formula in cycling that the number of bikes you have is n where n+1 is the actual figure you arrive at within a certain space of time!

    If, like you, on your new road bike, you have just the one bike, there are a number of good options of lightweight mudguards of which the best I've seen are the new model SKS full length race guards. Take them off in summer, put them on in winter. Actually these last type are quick fit and remove to the extent that you could change them depending on weather. A mate of mine, a bloody good cyclist, has just one bike and just takes off the guards in summer. It's a perfectly workable solution.
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    cheers borders,
    That all makes sense. Where I'm coming from having only just invested in a new bike is that I've kinda put all my eggs in one basket, I just needed 'a road bike' and the sportive type that suits my needs would probably do winter tyres and mudguards etc. Part of my reason for asking is concern that my new steed won't do winters and I'm gonna break it.

    If I wore a bit out, I'd buy a new bit of Tiagra without too much expense, but I guess if people have megabucks dream machines to race on etc. in the summer, I can see why they might not want to trash them in the winter. Mind you, this winter's been great! I wonder how many people have actually used their winter bikes regardless, or have been brave enough to 'risk it', as presumably the 'summer' bike is a better ride, otherwise they've wasted their money.

    On the other hand, I also see that if they get a sweet setup, they'll want to make it last so hibernating it will make it last. Okay, I'm happy with all that reasoning. Thanks.

    I was always a mountain biker who never bothered with mudguards, so i guess I wasn't thinking about them. I can see how the constant spray off a road can be irritating, whereas getting covered in mud was part of the point for me! Everything else was down to maintenance, and replacing bits that got trashed. One bike at a time was plenty.
  • bails87
    bails87 Posts: 12,998
    DonutDad: One road bike is fine, just don't ride it on ice! A 'winter' bike may have space for spiked tyres, but that may be more of a commuter's concern rather than a leisure/fitness rider's one.

    For mudguards, Crud roadracers worked well for me on my Ribble Sportive bike.
    MTB/CX

    "As I said last time, it won't happen again."
  • DonutDad wrote:
    I have a question (forgive me, I'm new to this, but this is road beginners, right...)
    Why does everyone have a winter bike and a summer bike?

    DD, the main reasons many people have a winter bike are

    1. The "best bike", used almost only in dry weather will last a lot longer and need maintenance/cleaning/lubricating less frequently.

    2. In winter, mudguards are essential to avoid soaking wet freezing cold feet, and to protect the front/rear derailleurs/chain and so forth getting caked with salty, dirty stuff off the road. Not to mention the dirty wet stripe up your back! "Best bikes" generally cannot fit proper full length guards because the frames have close clearances around wheels/brakes.

    3. Slightly wider tyres are better in winter to afford better grip on wet roads - see clearance issue above.

    4. Yes, it's a little bit about having two bikes! There's a formula in cycling that the number of bikes you have is n where n+1 is the actual figure you arrive at within a certain space of time!

    If, like you, on your new road bike, you have just the one bike, there are a number of good options of lightweight mudguards of which the best I've seen are the new model SKS full length race guards. Take them off in summer, put them on in winter. Actually these last type are quick fit and remove to the extent that you could change them depending on weather. A mate of mine, a bloody good cyclist, has just one bike and just takes off the guards in summer. It's a perfectly workable solution.

    I always wondered about this. I just thought I was going a bit retro in the winter.
    FCN: Brompton: 12, Tourer: 7, Racer: 4

    http://www.60milestonod.blogspot.com
  • It's early. but I've already switched from the winter bike to the spring bike.

    If we have as good a spring as forecasters asre currently predicting, I may make a similiarly early switch from the spring bike to the summer bikes.

    There's currently no telling when I'll want to switch from the summer bikes to the autumn bikes.

    Probably switch back to the winter bike around November or December.

    bc
    2013 Colnago Master 30th Anniversary
    2010 Colnago C50
    2005 Colnago C40
    2002 Colnago CT1
    2010 Colnago World Cup
    2013 Cinelli Supercorsa
    2009 Merckx LXM
    1995 Lemond Gan Team
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    Yepp, stuck my RS80s back on at the w/e, mudguards came off and I got a couple of lovely rides in shorts and mitts...too frigging cold for just shorts now though. Went out earlier and had to wear tights and decent gloves too...and the overnight forecast for the next 10 days is dropping back down to 2 degrees. The worst thing is that I am also getting a constant whining noise in my ears due the temp dropping....Nothing medical, I just turned the central heating off on Saturday and my wife wants to turn it back on :)
  • alihisgreat
    alihisgreat Posts: 3,872
    Simon E wrote:
    As you are obviously in need of assistance here are some possible ways to choose:

    1. When the clocks go forward.
    2. Check the forecast for rain.
    3. Toss a coin (not easy for those with 3 bikes all wanting some lurve).
    4. Alternate between them on each week or ride so neither feels left out.
    5. Ask your next door neighbour. They probably think you're weird already but it will remove any doubt.
    5. Ride the bike you like riding most every time and quit caring. Wear it out, that's what it's for.

    Is that enough?


    3. random number generator.. for those with more than two bikes?

    or

    3. double headed coin.. for those with one bike :roll:
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    edited February 2012
    Spring bikes and Autumn bikes too ?
    Can you tell if a bike is being ridden 'out of season' ?

    I like the idea of that actually... A nice metallic blue/white for Winter (wide tyres, furry saddle, led lighting), switching to fresh greens and yellows for Spring, purples with perhaps an orange accent in Summer before bringing the orange more to the fore, accompanied by subtle reddish browns and greys for Autumn.

    Those of us with just one bike, can stick to good old red, white and black - shouldn't be too hard to find.

    Next question: Who wears different outfits to compliment the different bikes ? come on now...

    I TOTALLY get this now :D
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    sungod wrote:
    ...imho every day i'm not riding it is a day i'll never ride it, i'd rather enjoy things


    I like that. Well said.
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    Simon E wrote:

    3. double headed coin.. for those with one bike :roll:

    Ah but what if I call tails ?
  • I am a convert to the Summer/Winter bike after being initially skeptical. I bought a shiny carbon bike in Summer 2010, I ride a lot of country back roads and in October there was a noticeable increase in muck and grit and I went from having to clean the bike every few weeks to having to do it every ride. So I bought a cheap Halfords bikes, fitted some mudguards and rode it for the rest of the winter, I set a date of April 1st for when I would transition and held out for that.

    I switched back to the Winter bike again, this October, and despite lots of wet weather I have able to get in lots of long slow distance (100km+) rides in relative comfort, when everyone else was avoiding going out. The roads aren't too bad now, so I take the Summer bike if it's dry and Winter one if it's wet.

    One think I will note, my winter bike is 13kgs plus wind stall mudguards versus 8kg aero for Summer. Out of curiosity I researched the heavier bike training question and all the experts said it doesn't make any difference, you just ride a lighter bike faster with same power, so it's no advantage. I disagree for two reasons, 1st: If you are on a group ride, you will ride at the group pace, so if you are on a heavy un-aero bike you will work harder than on your good bike. 2nd: It will take you longer to climb every hill on the heavy bike than the light bike at the same power, so you will get a longer workout. By the end of the Winter, I was matching my Summer bike times on Climbs and am subsequently significantly better when I go back to the Summer bike.
    MTB HardTail: GT Aggressor XC2 '09
    Road Summer(s): Kuota Kharma '10
    Road Winter(w): Carrera Virtuoso '10
    Full Suspension: Trek Fuel Ex 8 '11

    http://app.strava.com/athletes/130161
  • Bobbinogs
    Bobbinogs Posts: 4,841
    ...I went from having to clean the bike every few weeks to having to do it every ride. So I bought a cheap Halfords bike...

    Yeegads :shock:
  • Oops! I assumed too much, this is a beginners forum: Increased need to clean, means obviously, more dirt, which will lead to increased mechanical wear and thus increased frequency of replacement of expensive mechanical parts.

    Dirt acts like grinding paste, so using a bike with cheaper replacement parts, or mudguards to keep said dirt off those parts only makes practical sense.

    Depends on how much you ride your bike too I guess, if you are only doing a few thousand kilometers a year then the wear frequency may be more acceptable but if you are doing over 10,000 then a winter bike becomes essential kit, like winter clothes.
    MTB HardTail: GT Aggressor XC2 '09
    Road Summer(s): Kuota Kharma '10
    Road Winter(w): Carrera Virtuoso '10
    Full Suspension: Trek Fuel Ex 8 '11

    http://app.strava.com/athletes/130161
  • DonutDad
    DonutDad Posts: 104
    1st: If you are on a group ride, you will ride at the group pace, so if you are on a heavy un-aero bike you will work harder than on your good bike.
    But... you said everyone else was avoiding going out...
    Ahh, there ARE others with winter bikes... doesn't that mean you'll all go slower together ?
  • Going slower, see point 2.
    MTB HardTail: GT Aggressor XC2 '09
    Road Summer(s): Kuota Kharma '10
    Road Winter(w): Carrera Virtuoso '10
    Full Suspension: Trek Fuel Ex 8 '11

    http://app.strava.com/athletes/130161
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    Some people like to think bike/component weight makes a bigger difference than it really does.

    A doctor compared commuting times on his old steel tourer and a somewhat lighter carbon bike. There's a discussion in this thread, it was featured by Bikebiz, and the subject was revisited in the latest CTC magazine. For general day-to-day riding it seems there may be other factors that may have a greater bearing on overall travel time than bike weight.

    I commuted on my nearly-new road bike in its first winter (2008-2009). Exposed metal soon furred up and looked corroded from the salt, the rear shifting quality became really sluggish, the brake adjuster screw and QR got difficult to move. As a result I decided to use the 12 year old rigid MTB with 1.5" slicks for poorer weather, which it shrugs off with aplomb. As a result the road bike hasn't needed much maintenance at all.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    My winter / tourer / utility bike is about 25% slower than the summer bike.

    I ride the summer bike as soon as I dare! I.e. when I don't need a big front light for the commute, usually.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}
  • I wonder how many people have actually used their winter bikes regardless, or have been brave enough to 'risk it', as presumably the 'summer' bike is a better ride, otherwise they've wasted their money.

    I don't understand the 'wasting their money' bit, what about protecting their investment. Since Aug '10, I've 10,000km done on my Summer bike and 5,000km done on my Winter bike. Those 5,000 Winter Km's have been far more damaging that the 10,000 Summer KM's. I can replace the Winter bike 4.5 times before it will cost as much as the Summer bike.

    The Doctor who did the experiment with the steel and carbon bikes, did it pootling on a commute, in which case the advantages of the lighter, stiffer bike won't really be demonstrated. If he had compared them over hilly 100km sportives or in race conditions then he would have appreciated the new bike a lot more.
    MTB HardTail: GT Aggressor XC2 '09
    Road Summer(s): Kuota Kharma '10
    Road Winter(w): Carrera Virtuoso '10
    Full Suspension: Trek Fuel Ex 8 '11

    http://app.strava.com/athletes/130161
  • I took my "summer" bike out the weekend just gone and it felt great! In reality it's more of dry weather bike an my old alu Giant is for commuting/wet club runs and considerably heavier so the hours on the road using that through the winter have had their benefit, as when I got back on my carbon bike it feels like your flying along.
  • desweller
    desweller Posts: 5,175
    I wonder how many people have actually used their winter bikes regardless, or have been brave enough to 'risk it', as presumably the 'summer' bike is a better ride, otherwise they've wasted their money.

    I don't understand the 'wasting their money' bit, what about protecting their investment. Since Aug '10, I've 10,000km done on my Summer bike and 5,000km done on my Winter bike. Those 5,000 Winter Km's have been far more damaging that the 10,000 Summer KM's. I can replace the Winter bike 4.5 times before it will cost as much as the Summer bike.

    The Doctor who did the experiment with the steel and carbon bikes, did it pootling on a commute, in which case the advantages of the lighter, stiffer bike won't really be demonstrated. If he had compared them over hilly 100km sportives or in race conditions then he would have appreciated the new bike a lot more.

    Yep, the winter beast is a lot cheaper and more sturdily built than the light roadie. It takes more abuse and I don't worry if the paint gets knocked about a bit.
    - - - - - - - - - -
    On Strava.{/url}