Britains favourite supermarket foods.

Frank the tank
Frank the tank Posts: 6,553
edited February 2012 in The bottom bracket
Anyone see this? BBC1 Wednesday 8.00pm.

Some may already know but they did a test on how milk compared to the sports drinks as a post exercise recovery drink.

Milk, beit full fat,semi-skimmed or skimmed came out best.

Fair do's it wasn't a fully extensive range of all sports drinks but, food (or drink) for thought.

It convinced me anyway, skimmed milk about 45p/litre much cheapness. :D
Tail end Charlie

The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.

Comments

  • rc856
    rc856 Posts: 1,144
    My physio, who also does work with some British teams, told me that milk and chocoloate Nesquik is ideal for a recovery drink......tastes good too :D
  • t.m.h.n.e.t
    t.m.h.n.e.t Posts: 2,265
    Yeah the sports drinks are full of carbs which are great,but it's protein which repairs muscle fibre.

    Milk is godly :)
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,404
    It convinced me anyway, skimmed milk about 45p/litre much cheapness. :D
    Cheaper than a litre of bottled water.

    How a litre of goodness-laden drink that's been produced by an animal who has been looked after throughout the year and round the clock by some farmer and has been processed by a dairy can cost less than a litre of water that's come out of the ground and put into a bottle, is totally beyond me. (Probably the same efficient economic system that means it's cheaper to jump into a jet that costs £60m and flies at 20,000ft to go from England to Scotland than it is to get on a train that costs £3m and carries twice as many people.)
  • jonsi
    jonsi Posts: 44
    It convinced me anyway, skimmed milk about 45p/litre much cheapness. :D
    Cheaper than a litre of bottled water.

    How a litre of goodness-laden drink that's been produced by an animal who has been looked after throughout the year and round the clock by some farmer and has been processed by a dairy can cost less than a litre of water that's come out of the ground and put into a bottle, is totally beyond me. (Probably the same efficient economic system that means it's cheaper to jump into a jet that costs £60m and flies at 20,000ft to go from England to Scotland than it is to get on a train that costs £3m and carries twice as many people.)

    +1
  • My son (18) works on a farm (300 cows) and I often wonder how they can make enough money, he starts work around 7.15 - 7-30 am and most evenings it's dark when he gets home (last night it was 6.30), hard often wet work, one weekend on one weekend off, not bad money for an 18 year old, but HARD WORK !

    It convinced me anyway, skimmed milk about 45p/litre much cheapness. :D
    Cheaper than a litre of bottled water.

    How a litre of goodness-laden drink that's been produced by an animal who has been looked after throughout the year and round the clock by some farmer and has been processed by a dairy can cost less than a litre of water that's come out of the ground and put into a bottle, is totally beyond me. (Probably the same efficient economic system that means it's cheaper to jump into a jet that costs £60m and flies at 20,000ft to go from England to Scotland than it is to get on a train that costs £3m and carries twice as many people.)
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,404
    My son (18) works on a farm and I often wonder how they can make enough money, he starts work around 7.15 - 7-30 am and most evenings it's dark when he gets home (last night it was 6.30), hard often wet work, one weekend on one weekend off, not bad money for an 18 year old, but HARD WORK !
    And I was a herdsman for fourteen years. And when you see the result of yours and the cows' labour being sold for less than water, it does lead you to question the economic system that can produce such a gross distortion.

    Incidentally, when the film AI came out, I did wonder how they were going to fill 2 hours of screen time with men stick their arms up cows' arses. Turns out the film wasn't about artificial insemination after all.
  • My son (18) works on a farm and I often wonder how they can make enough money, he starts work around 7.15 - 7-30 am and most evenings it's dark when he gets home (last night it was 6.30), hard often wet work, one weekend on one weekend off, not bad money for an 18 year old, but HARD WORK !
    And I was a herdsman for fourteen years. And when you see the result of yours and the cows' labour being sold for less than water, it does lead you to question the economic system that can produce such a gross distortion.

    Incidentally, when the film AI came out, I did wonder how they were going to fill 2 hours of screen time with men stick their arms up cows' arses. Turns out the film wasn't about artificial insemination after all.

    Farmers get a rough deal from the supermarkets and short of everyone boycotting them there's not too much we can do about that. Please, don't get me started.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.
  • cornerblock
    cornerblock Posts: 3,228
    Please, don't get me started.

    Ok.

    gotmilk2+%282%29.jpg
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,404
    Farmers get a rough deal from the supermarkets and short of everyone boycotting them there's not too much we can do about that. Please, don't get me started.
    Ooh, can I get you started?

    The trouble is that most of us are hypocrites, and continue to fund a supermarket system that (now) has an inbuilt imbalance of power. This has happened in my lifetime. Tesco UK profits of £2.5bn in 2010/11 equates to a profit of nearly £42 for every single person in the UK. (Though that pales in comparison with the profit Apple is making per person on the whole planet.) These are obscene figures.

    The difficulty is that every single time we spend money we are making moral choices, and each one is incredibly (impossibly) complicated. And all our values are skewed by the way that we become programmed (through necessity or otherwise) not to 'waste' money, sometimes simply to make ends meet and feed our families, other times just through the 'bargain hunting' impulse most of us seem to have. How we spend our money is probably the most powerful and morally effective action most of us make. Too many of us have abdicated our responsibilities to the supermarkets, and most supermarkets have only one moral principle: profit for the shareholders.

    We've lost the degree of trust that used to exist in the High Street: between the farmer and the dairy or market; between the wholesaler and the retailer; and between the retailer and the (please excuse the politically incorrect, but nonetheless accurate) housewife. All the power now resides with the supermarkets.

    Specifically in milk, since the demise of the Milk Marketing Board (the deregulation panacea) the proportion of the price of a litre of milk paid to the primary producer (the farmer) has declined rapidly. As The Guardian reported in 2010 "The supermarkets have quintupled their profit margin on milk in the last 15 years. Farmers who had made 4p a litre on milk now make nothing, or (as I found when I talked to many in January) less than 1p. Without investment, dairy processing moved abroad, and even though Britain produces the cheapest milk in Europe we now import much of our butter, 40% of our yoghurt and 40% of cheddar." Oxford University economists have detailed the imbalance of power in the dairy chain. But we allow cling onto the fantasy that supermarkets represent a free market. It's not a free market. It's a market controlled by the supermarkets. We're deluded if we think otherwise.

    There. Saturday night's polemic.
  • milk is the devils spaff

    yours lactose intolerantly
    'dont forget lads, one evertonian is worth twenty kopites'
  • roddixon
    roddixon Posts: 100
    milk is the devils spaff

    yours lactose intolerantly
    You poor (genetically deficient) b**ger :wink:

    I get through at least a half a pint of devil's spaff a day, if not more
  • Incidentally, when the film AI came out, I did wonder how they were going to fill 2 hours of screen time with men stick their arms up cows' arses. Turns out the film wasn't about artificial insemination after all.
    If you think artificial insemination involves the arse, then you need a long chat with your father as you obviously missed one when you were in your teens.
  • briantrumpet
    briantrumpet Posts: 17,404
    If you think artificial insemination involves the ars*, then you need a long chat with your father as you obviously missed one when you were in your teens.
    It does.

    You stick your hand up the cow's ar$e and grab hold of the cervix through the thin tissue separating the defecatory and sexual tracts. Then you insert the AI thingy that holds the straw of semen into the cervix via the, er, correct orifice until you feel the tip of the AI thingy touch the tip of your finger that's resting on the far end of the cervix. Then you gently push the button on the end of the AI thingy to release the bull semen into the uterus, the objective to get the semen to go up both fallopian tubes, as you don't know which horn of the uterus has the egg travelling down it. I know, because I've done the training, and have got a cow in calf.

    Serves you right.
  • Want bitty....
  • Farmers get a rough deal from the supermarkets and short of everyone boycotting them there's not too much we can do about that. Please, don't get me started.
    Ooh, can I get you started?

    The trouble is that most of us are hypocrites, and continue to fund a supermarket system that (now) has an inbuilt imbalance of power. This has happened in my lifetime. Tesco UK profits of £2.5bn in 2010/11 equates to a profit of nearly £42 for every single person in the UK. (Though that pales in comparison with the profit Apple is making per person on the whole planet.) These are obscene figures.

    The difficulty is that every single time we spend money we are making moral choices, and each one is incredibly (impossibly) complicated. And all our values are skewed by the way that we become programmed (through necessity or otherwise) not to 'waste' money, sometimes simply to make ends meet and feed our families, other times just through the 'bargain hunting' impulse most of us seem to have. How we spend our money is probably the most powerful and morally effective action most of us make. Too many of us have abdicated our responsibilities to the supermarkets, and most supermarkets have only one moral principle: profit for the shareholders.

    We've lost the degree of trust that used to exist in the High Street: between the farmer and the dairy or market; between the wholesaler and the retailer; and between the retailer and the (please excuse the politically incorrect, but nonetheless accurate) housewife. All the power now resides with the supermarkets.

    Specifically in milk, since the demise of the Milk Marketing Board (the deregulation panacea) the proportion of the price of a litre of milk paid to the primary producer (the farmer) has declined rapidly. As The Guardian reported in 2010 "The supermarkets have quintupled their profit margin on milk in the last 15 years. Farmers who had made 4p a litre on milk now make nothing, or (as I found when I talked to many in January) less than 1p. Without investment, dairy processing moved abroad, and even though Britain produces the cheapest milk in Europe we now import much of our butter, 40% of our yoghurt and 40% of cheddar." Oxford University economists have detailed the imbalance of power in the dairy chain. But we allow cling onto the fantasy that supermarkets represent a free market. It's not a free market. It's a market controlled by the supermarkets. We're deluded if we think otherwise.

    There. Saturday night's polemic.

    When farming becomes totally unprofitable due to the big four and we as a nation have lost the ability to feed ourselves who do we blame?

    Everything has to be grown, mined, made or processed. We as a nation are slowly losing the ability to do any of these things. God help us, we can't all work in services or finance.

    To get back on track, it's the milky way for me.
    Tail end Charlie

    The above post may contain traces of sarcasm or/and bullsh*t.