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Speed with (relative) comfort?

*Dusty**Dusty* Posts: 35
edited January 2012 in Road buying advice
Greetings all.

I've recently joined this illustrious establishment after purchasing a little Hybird from Halfords (I know, forgive me...) and rediscovering my love for cycling which I have been neglecting for 15 odd years. Work, family, kids etc have conspired against me but I'm now looking at a 13 mile commute to work to build fitness and lose a bit of the christmas indulgence.

I'm really after some advice to be honest, which road bike offers a fair compromise of speed and comfort? I don't want to hobble into the office, my work involves a bit of walking during the day so NOT being crippled on arrival would be a big bonus :D

I have no intention of racing or club riding or anything, i will most likely go for a bit of a jaunt on my own from time to time for pleasure but the main purpose of the bike will be for the commute on mainly b-roads with a bit of a town centre in the middle of it all!

Somewhere in th £400 -700 range if possible, failing that all hints and tips appreciated :)

Posts

  • Cornish-JCornish-J Posts: 978
    If it's mainly b roads for commuting then i'd stick with the hybrid or get a CX.

    boardman range offer pretty good value for money in your price bracket.
  • *Dusty**Dusty* Posts: 35
    Ok thanks, hybrid feels a bit short geared for that kind of distance to be honest, maybe i'll get used to that over time though. If it would save me money on buying another bike so much the better though!

    Again pardon my ignorance but what's a CX? Cyclocross? one of those road bike things with mountain bike tyres?
  • bristolpetebristolpete Posts: 2,255
    Tale a look at the Specialized Secteur range. £650.00 up.

    Long wheelbase, reasonable length on the head tube for comfort, carbon forks with a zert instert, 700c wheels with 25c tyre, nice colours, lifetime warranty on the frame and rides well for the money.
  • esspeebeeesspeebee Posts: 174
    CX is, as you said, cyclocross. Essentially a road bike, but with tyres and brakes that will let you ride in the mud as well. The Specialized Tricross is worth a look for an example of that type that should be in your price range, or the Boardman CX range.

    Your other option is an out-and-out road bike, but one built for distance riding rather than racing -- for that, I'd look at the Giant Defy range, or similar bikes from many other manufacturers. You'll feel the road more than on a CX bike, but the riding position is still tuned for comfort so you shouldn't arrive with a broken back.

    Between those two, the choice really rests on where you're going to ride it, and which type you get on with best. The best thing you can do would be to find a local bike shop (not Halfords), tell them what you just posted here, and they should be able to suggest a few options that you can try out. Ultimately, the right bike is the one that you enjoy riding, not what some guy on the internet says is best.
  • *Dusty* wrote:
    Ok thanks, hybrid feels a bit short geared for that kind of distance to be honest, maybe i'll get used to that over time though. If it would save me money on buying another bike so much the better though!

    Again pardon my ignorance but what's a CX? Cyclocross? one of those road bike things with mountain bike tyres?

    A cheaper option might be to speak to your local bike shop about re-gearing your bike. It doesn't cost much to change a front chainring but you would need a new chain for the extra length required.

    [yes By CX he meant cyclocross, some people buy them and put road tyres on, I don't really see why. I use my CX for cyclocross and my road bike for the road. but then - I've always been an odd'un.]
    Quintana Roo Kilo ~ Genesis Equilibrium ~ Focus Mares ~ Trek EX7
  • Cornish-JCornish-J Posts: 978
    If your aims are purely commuting in comfort then a cx bike with slicks is a good alternative to a road bike imo - you get disc brakes, thicker tyres which are far better for our crappy roads and crappy weather and a much more comfortable ride.
    and you still have the option of riding it off road/trails too.

    only my opinion though...
  • *Dusty**Dusty* Posts: 35
    Cheer all for the help. I've zero intention of buying one off the 'net, it'll be bought from a localish bike shop. Being in good old Northern Ireland kind of limits my options outside of Belfast but I believe McConveys have a good reputation.

    Good sensible stuff going on so far, keep up the excellent work chaps! :):)
  • *Dusty**Dusty* Posts: 35
    Yes, I'll pop in and see them too. Get a bit of discount with a work perks card through McConvey's though, on a bike at that price it would go someway to paying for the essentials and clothing :)
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