TT Wheels

Dick Scruttock
Dick Scruttock Posts: 2,533
edited December 2011 in Road buying advice
What depth of wheels would people recommend for someone new to time trials? Had been looking at 80/101 from PX but someone has said got for 50 and a rear disk. Would 50/50 and a disk cover be a pretty good compromise as not really feeling like splashing £1k + on a disk at this stage.

Did ride a friends bike with 80/101's and it was ok, a little unnerving when trucks came past though!

Comments

  • How fast are you?

    TT bike or road bike?

    Aero helmet or normal one

    Skinsuit or top and shorts

    How long are your "races" ?
  • napoleond
    napoleond Posts: 5,992
    edited December 2011
    I wouldn't get an 80 front yet. If you get well into it consider it an option on a really still day.

    50/50 with disk cover is an excellent compromise. (and probably more aero due to the lenticular shape than a flat disc wheel)
    Insta: ATEnduranceCoaching
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  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    50mm's and a disc cover sounds a pretty good compromise, you could then use the wheels if you go road racing.
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    NapoleonD wrote:
    I wouldn't get an 80 front yet. If you get well into it consider it an option on a really still day.

    50/50 with disk cover is an excellent compromise. (and probably more aero due to the lenticular shape than a flat disc wheel)

    +1

    I have a Blackwell Research rear disc (re-badged Zipp900) that I use, my coach needed some power data (CP20 & CP60) so I rode a normal road wheel with a disc cover in a couple of races, I did a 59min 25 on a not very quick course with it, which was a suprise, so yes, I'd say a pair of 50's with a disc cover would be a great way to start.

    How about these? 1595g clinchers for £399 a pair (bloody bargain if you ask me) http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/WPP ... r_wheelset
  • danowat wrote:
    NapoleonD wrote:
    I wouldn't get an 80 front yet. If you get well into it consider it an option on a really still day.

    50/50 with disk cover is an excellent compromise. (and probably more aero due to the lenticular shape than a flat disc wheel)

    +1

    I have a Blackwell Research rear disc (re-badged Zipp900) that I use, my coach needed some power data (CP20 & CP60) so I rode a normal road wheel with a disc cover in a couple of races, I did a 59min 25 on a not very quick course with it, which was a suprise, so yes, I'd say a pair of 50's with a disc cover would be a great way to start.

    How about these? 1595g clinchers for £399 a pair (bloody bargain if you ask me) http://www.planet-x-bikes.co.uk/i/q/WPP ... r_wheelset

    Would i be better of with clinchers rather than tubulars?

    I was going for some Planet X wheels as the value is great. I notice that they have deals on the 50/82 wheelset and i can still get a disk cover for these wheels. The 50/50 wheel set is out of stock at the minute but if these are the better option I will bide my time until the have them.
  • markos1963
    markos1963 Posts: 3,724
    The advantage of using 50's is that if the wind gets up you can still ride ok without the disc cover, get the 82/101 and you'll be a gibbering wreck before the turn around.

    As for tubs vs clinchers well it's up to you but if you are just using them for racing then I'd go tubs to get the weight benefit as well as the ability to ride home if you flat on them.
  • danowat
    danowat Posts: 2,877
    I run tubs, simply because the rims were cheaper and lighter, if I was in the market now for some 50's, I'd go for those clinchers.

    As for riding home on a flat tub, hmmmm, I tried to ride 1 mile from the startline at a TT back to the HQ, and the result wasn't pretty
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    What depth of wheels would people recommend for someone new to time trials?
    If you're new to time trialling I wouldn't recommend wheels at all. I'd recommend training, pacing your effort and working on making yourself more aerodynamic. Get the basics right first, they will gain you more time than wheels.
    Would i be better of with clinchers rather than tubulars?
    If you have to ask then you wouldn't want tubs.

    If you really want a pair of wheels I'd suggest American Classic AM 420 Aero 3 (30mm section). Good reviews online, a few people in our club have them and rate them highly. Otherwise maybe the the 50mm Shimano RS80s or their pricier Dura-Ace siblings.
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • Simon E wrote:
    Would i be better of with clinchers rather than tubulars?
    If you have to ask then you wouldn't want tubs.

    If you really want a pair of wheels I'd suggest American Classic AM 420 Aero 3 (30mm section). Good reviews online, a few people in our club have them and rate them highly. Otherwise maybe the the 50mm Shimano RS80s or their pricier Dura-Ace siblings.

    Why, at least take the time to explain your reasoning for the tubs v clinchers decision.
  • simon_e
    simon_e Posts: 1,706
    Why, at least take the time to explain your reasoning for the tubs v clinchers decision.
    It's a take on the old aphorism "If you have to ask you can't afford it". If you don't yet understand the pros and cons of each then how are you able to make an informed choice?

    Go for clinchers and a decent pair of race tyres e.g. Pro 3, Ultremo, GP4000S or Corsa Evo CX. But, as I said earlier, are wheels really your top priority at this point?
    Aspire not to have more, but to be more.
  • I was same, couldn't justify a grand for a disc. After some research of them all, i ended up with a HED Disc and a Hed 60 front for around £1400 which for two wheels that have some good aero research behind them I thought was a good deal.
    I bought clinchers as a spare tube and levers takes up little space and weight behind your saddle, easy and cheaper to repair than a tub, Conti suspersonic tyres are noticeably fast when you ride them for first time, seem to last well too, arguably the best TT clincher out there and also the disc is really a cover and underneath just spokes, so upshot is easy to fix with a spoke key and they ride like normal wheels so comfort and handling is great, I've never ridden a full carbon disc but would imagine a stiff harsher rider. My choice turned out to be not the most expensive wheelset and not the heaviest neither, the rear is lighter than some but heavier than say more pricy zipps, the front is very light too, lovely to ride and reckon I could use the next size up on the front on calmer days.
    Suited my budget perfect and I most certainly went faster.
    Team4Luke supports Cardiac Risk in the Young
  • I have a set of planet x 82/101 for sale with tubs and cassette - pm me if interested.