Forum home Road cycling forum Road general

Vintage road bike ID help

oldskaterdoodoldskaterdood Posts: 18
edited December 2011 in Road general
2011-11-28140655-1.jpg
2011-11-28142258-1.jpg
2011-11-28140545-1.jpg
2011-11-28140423-1.jpg
2011-11-28140612-1.jpg
2011-11-28140355-1.jpg
Any ideas?

Posts

  • Monty DogMonty Dog Posts: 20,614
    I can't help in terms of the maker, but suggest that it's probably from the late 1970's judging by the frame and components. I don't believe it's a high-spec model due to the pressed lugs.
    Make mine an Italian, with Campagnolo on the side..
  • Monty Dog wrote:
    I can't help in terms of the maker, but suggest that it's probably from the late 1970's judging by the frame and components. I don't believe it's a high-spec model due to the pressed lugs.

    I disagree... there is no mech hanger, which suggests it's a frame of the 1950s. Also, cottered single chainsets had long disappeard on road bikes by then. Brakes and stuff are a later addition. There is only one cable guide for the gears, which again, points to 1950s
    It could well be a Claud Butler, which has been badly neglected and terribly repainted. If the guy wants to spend some money on it, it could come out a very nice restoration for rides like "l'Eroica", "L'Anjou velo vintage" or the "Retroronde". Rust is probably only superficial, worth having a go with sandpaper to check how deep it is... in the presence of deep corrosion, it's not worth bothering.

    PM me if you are interested in the project... I am currently restoring a 1952 Claud Butler on a shoestring and can give you some advice... budget 500-600 pounds for respray and rebuild with decent period components (Campagnolo Gran Sport or Simplex)... that's the price of a low range plastic frame these days
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 15,959
    I disagree... there is no mech hanger, which suggests it's a frame of the 1950s. Also, cottered single chainsets had long disappeard on road bikes by then. Brakes and stuff are a later addition. There is only one cable guide for the gears, which again, points to 1950s
    It could well be a Claud Butler, which has been badly neglected and terribly repainted. If the guy wants to spend some money on it, it could come out a very nice restoration for rides like "l'Eroica", "L'Anjou velo vintage" or the "Retroronde". Rust is probably only superficial, worth having a go with sandpaper to check how deep it is... in the presence of deep corrosion, it's not worth bothering.

    +1 - to me the frame lugs look very 1950s in style. By the 70s, that sort lug would have been pretty old fashioned and I would have thought high end only (for the older, wealthier cyclist!).

    That is a terrible paintjob though - looks like even the saddle is trying to escape! :lol:
    Faster than a tent.......
  • WOW thanks for your responses ppl! Very interesting.

    I purchased the bike for £10 at my local tip, saw the lugs and couldnt leave it there..

    I have restored a few bikes from the tip while i was off work for 18 months with a prolapse disc, all restos have been on a shoe string, proper home brue efforts but with good results. Mostly kids bikes for family and friends and a couple raleigh burners which are now sold.

    I am back at work now so not much time for restos but my road and mountain bikes do get used weekly.

    I did this CB legend up for myself,

    BEFORE...

    2011-02-20130732-1.jpg

    AFTER...

    2011-05-06130200_Bridgwater_GB-1.jpg

    I cold set the stays for a 9 speed wheel and chopped off the brake bosses for a cleaner look and fitted these nice old brakes (also from the tip)

    2011-05-06130355_Bridgwater_GB-1.jpg

    I get on really well with the bike but its a bit heavy (reynolds 500)

    Im temped to clean up the 1950's? frame to use instead or maybe start again and build it up as a fixie but i wasnt sure if its worth the hassle. I am more inspired now that it could be a 50's bike, it seems pretty light, any ideas what the tubing might be?
  • I am almost certain it's a Claud Butler, the design of the cable router and the braze ons for the pump are exactly like a 1950s Claud Butler, Holsworth period... if it's not, it's a damn good copy!
    If it is, then it's probably Reynold 531, and yes, it will be light, depending on the size even less than 2 Kg for the frame only... the fork will be a bit sturdier.
    If it's a 1950s, the rear dropouts will be 120 mm wide and the front is likely to be a touch smaller than 100 mm, even down to 93-94. Seat tube is likely to be a 26.4 or thereabout.
    Restoring with modern components will be a lot of hassle and the result disappointing, I think you should go period (unless you want the fixie). The difficult parts to find are a 120 mm hub for road and not track, but you can buy an old 126, remove spacers and file down the axle to fit your frame... I've done it succesfully in the past. Your frame asks for a single chainset, or alternatively a double with some form of vintage stick front derailleur (Simplex made a nice one at the time)... if you want a double, then you have to find an elegant and practical way to route the cable, as there are no braze ons on the left and you probably don't have a hole in the BB shell to fit a plastic "router". Other parts can be sourced at cycle jumbles and with a bit more money on Ebay or at "Campyoldy", Nigel can be very helpful and he's definitively up for advice if you need.
    But first thing first, you need to get that cottered chainset/BB out, which is not going to be easy and then you need to invest in a respray (decals can be found on Ebay or elsewhere), as at the moment it looks awful
  • 2011-12-02141126-1.jpg

    Thanks again for your help ugo. Great info !

    As you can see i got the bike dismantled without marking that beautiful paint job! :) The frame with the headset cups still installed and all that paint weighs 2.3kg according to my kitchen scales.

    The BB shell was still full of grease and generaly the frame is in very good nick with all threads in tacked etc. Ive filled all the tubes up with oil while i decide its future.

    I'll get all the measurment soon and let you know (seat tube and spacings etc)

    WIll restoring the frame with modern parts really be that difficult and disapointing? I can re set the stays for 130mm spacing, fit band on shifters and mount a guide on the BB shell by drilling or just glueing.
    However the frame may be a tad large for me to do 100's of miles on so i may just go the fixie route anyway. Or just sell it.
Sign In or Register to comment.