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Shoes for cycling in the snow?

RowCycleRowCycle Posts: 367
edited December 2011 in Commuting general
Hello,

Inspired by another thread, when it snows I still commute into work, but on my mtb. This has normal pedals, which I appreciate as I can take my feet off if the bike starts to slide. But my feet get very wet.

Does anyone know of any overshoes, similar to the ones you put over cycling shoes/cleats but for normal shoes?

Thanks

Posts

  • not really, but not something I've ever looked for TBH.

    I'd suggest a pair of waterproof hiking shoes more snow friendly grip for those foot down moments too. I got a pair of Karrimor (the budget reincarnation of the brand) ones from Sports Direct for £20 last year for dog walking and ended up using them on the Ute bike for a lot of the cold weather and all of the snow/heavy frost days.

    or have you considered waterproof socks and a radiator
  • Wellingtons, black for town, green for country
  • TorvidTorvid Posts: 449
    417aY1TtUsL._SL150_.jpg

    might be slight toe overlap 8)
    Commuter: Forme Vision Red/Black FCN 4
    Weekender: White/Black - Cube Agree GTC pro FCN 3
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    I used my overshoes on normal shoes (basket ball boots) last year before I moved to SPDs.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    I'd suggest a pair of waterproof hiking shoes more snow friendly grip for those foot down moments too. I got a pair of Karrimor (the budget reincarnation of the brand) ones from Sports Direct for £20 last year for dog walking and ended up using them on the Ute bike for a lot of the cold weather and all of the snow/heavy frost days.

    Karrimor shoes - possibly the single worst product I have ever bought. It isn't just that the soles were made of cheese (actually, cheese might have lasted longer) but the two pairs I bought weren't even consistent with one pair being less disasterous than the other. Wholely innappropriate materials and terrible QA.

    I wouldn't wish Karrimor footwear on my worst enemy..........

    To OP - why not just get a pair of M520 pedals for the MTB? One thing about the snow is that it doesn't hurt if you fall off! You could use overshoes on normal footwear but they might not last too long.
    Faster than a tent.......
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    That would be because conventional wisdom says ditch the SPDs when the snow and ice comes.
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • DrLexDrLex Posts: 2,142
    What's wrong with "regular" overshoes for snow & ice? Might just need to size-up to fit over a boot/thick shoe. If traction on ice on dismount is a concern, then use cleats (yak trax or similar) that don't interfere too much with the pedal face.
    Location: ciderspace
  • I used my overshoes on normal shoes (basket ball boots) last year before I moved to SPDs.
    That would be because conventional wisdom says ditch the SPDs when the snow and ice comes.

    I'm a little confused - are you pro or anti SPD for snow?

    Personally, I'm SPD all the way - but then I ride on ice tyres and have every confidence in staying reasonably upright. In fact, snow really isn't the enemy, it's ice - the black stuff especially. Just ride in some decent boots - the same ones that you'd walk in snow in. Or get some studded tyres.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • rolf_frolf_f Posts: 16,015
    That would be because conventional wisdom says ditch the SPDs when the snow and ice comes.

    I've not heard conventional wisdom saying this! If conventional wisdom said this it would be confused that mountain bikers use SPDs at all considering how easy it is to fall off whilst off road. The only time I fell off in the snow, I was trying to plough through a foot deep fresh snow at stalling speed. Hardly surprising there was no time to unclip but I wasn't fussed as I expected, and got, a very soft landing! Normally you'd have as much time to react to a situation as any non snowy/icey circumstance and as Meanredspider says, if you are confident of staying upright why need to change pedals?
    Faster than a tent.......
  • bigmatbigmat Posts: 5,111
    +1 for waterproof walking boots. My issue with SPDs last winter was when it got too icy to continue (23mm slicks, I wasn't exactly prepared!)and I had to walk the bike home. The snow somehow compacted around the cleats and formed a mini ball of ice under the ball of my foot that made it really uncomfortable to walk and also impossible to clip in when I thought it might be safe to continue.

    I've got some knobblies ready for the MTB this winter, its great to be able to cycle to work when the trains and buses are cancelled!
  • Well - the first forecasts of snow are beginning to arrive for us. Personally I'm looking forward to it though I'd be happier if Mercedes had the winter tyres/wheels I ordered 6 weeks ago in stock. The muppets say there has been "unanticipated demand". Where have they been the last two winters?
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    I used my overshoes on normal shoes (basket ball boots) last year before I moved to SPDs.
    That would be because conventional wisdom says ditch the SPDs when the snow and ice comes.

    I'm a little confused - are you pro or anti SPD for snow?

    Personally, I'm SPD all the way - but then I ride on ice tyres and have every confidence in staying reasonably upright. In fact, snow really isn't the enemy, it's ice - the black stuff especially. Just ride in some decent boots - the same ones that you'd walk in snow in. Or get some studded tyres.

    I used my overshoes on normal shoes last winter, this summer I got SPDs, now I'm thinking I'll switch back to flat pedals and use regular boots when winter hits.

    I'm SPD in snow agnostic for now, I'll probably keep them on and see how it goes. I've been mud plugging in SPDs and it was OK, but clipping in and out is an extra thing to think about on the trail. On an icy a road you can just go over and there's not going to be a 10 ton truck with as little traction as you behind you on a MTB descent.

    Would being clipped in make a fall on ice on a road more or less likely to lead to broken bones and A&E visits?
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • there's not going to be a 10 ton truck with as little traction as you behind you on a MTB descent.

    You've obviously never been on an MTB descent with me behind you then... :wink:

    As I said, I think ice is far worse than snow from a falling over POV. I think unclipping has become second nature to me now as well (I've surprised myself on a couple of occasions - most recently when turning into a junction and nearly losing the front with a deflating tyre - and found my foot already off the pedal).

    Anyhow, better to have the right tyres and eliminate the issue than the "right" shoes and only mitigate some of the risk.
    ROAD < Scott Foil HMX Di2, Volagi Liscio Di2, Jamis Renegade Elite Di2, Cube Reaction Race > ROUGH
  • InitialisedInitialised Posts: 3,047
    That's me reassured, been itching to fit the Snow Studs since the first (so far only) frost. Will stick with the SPDs for at least the first two days of snow. After all, what's the worst that could happen, a few more scars and another broken bone or two?
    I used to just ride my bike to work but now I find myself going out looking for bigger and bigger hills.
  • The OrsThe Ors Posts: 130
    I have a couple of pairs of 'Hi-Tec Aukland WP' waterproof trainer/hiking shoes. One pair that I use for my MTB & the other for general use.

    About £30pr & despite the budget name I've found them warm, comfortable, hard-wearing & pretty good at keeping the water out. Despite being given a couple of years of good hard use the MTB pair are still going strong. Highly recommended.
  • Finlab6Finlab6 Posts: 127
    last year 2 pairs of socks, poly bag from sainsburys (tesco will also work) and pair of old cross trainers - toasty and dry
    MTB GT Avalanche 1.0
    Road - Specialized Allez Sport


    exercise.png
  • wyadvdwyadvd Posts: 590
    have a read on this website:

    http://www.icebike.org/
  • Got flat pedals on the mtb and I've been wearing neophrene overshoes over a pair of Inov-8 trail running trainers, these trainers are quite narrow so works well and feet are toasty, a long pair of socks helps too :)
    Road:Giant SCR3
    Commuting: Giant TCX2
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