E-Readers

Bunneh
Bunneh Posts: 1,329
edited November 2011 in The bottom bracket
The girlfriend did at one point ask for a Kindle for Christmas but as money got tighter she said it didn't matter; however I have been saving up a little (shuuush). I can't afford the £150 Kindle, but I can afford the £89 one - however I've started to see a glut of these e-readers lately, Android, Sony etc, and WHSmiths seem to have one too... thing is which one is the best to buy?

I know there's a glut of free books on Amazon, and when she's at mine she has access to my WiFi so 3G isn't really important, although it would be nice when she's out and about. I could of course use the various websites out there that give reviews but would prefer to get recommendations from real people, not some possibly sponsored site.

I can go to £100, that's my max.

Thanks :)

Comments

  • TheStone
    TheStone Posts: 2,291
    The new £89 one is a nicer product.
    No need for keyboard of 3G. I didn't use them at all.
    exercise.png
  • apreading
    apreading Posts: 4,535
    3G is a must on this - its the only way you can get your emails FREE, ANYWHERE in the world. You can also do facebook and check the news anywhere in the world if that takes your fancy.

    So no more expensive data charges when on holiday/business overseas.

    If you never travel or dont need or value access to the internet then you dont need 3G. For the majority its one of the best features, possibly even more important than the book reading!
  • MattC59
    MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    My Mrs has got the wifi version of the Kindle. She loves it !!
    when I bought it for her, I didn't really see the need for the 3G version. After all, how often do you suddenly finish a book, when you weren't expecting it, and then have nothing to read ? You can also put more than enough books onto it, so you shouldn't be in this position. For the amount of time that she's downloading books, you'll find that there's no inconvenience to not having 3G.

    As was mentioned earlier, if you want to download emails, read the paper etc, then buy the 3G version, but to be honest, as with most people who buy a Kindle, they buy it to read books. Stick with the standard version.

    In short, the Kindle is easy to use, has a battery life which seems to last for ever and the customer service which Amazon dedicate to Kindle is second to none. My Mrs had a screen failure, called to see what could be done and a replacement landed on the doorstep the next day. She also dropped one (the replacement :roll: ) in the bath, and although it wasn't covered under warranty, they gave here a new unit at a greatly reduced price (about 60% discount I seem to remember).

    I could go on (seriously, it's that good) but I can't be a*sed :D
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • pb21
    pb21 Posts: 2,170
    I don’t really get the point of these?

    I can understand MP3 players, they’re great being able to take your music collection wherever you go. But who has the need to carry more than one or two books around with them? Plus they're not much small than a paper book. Also books generally don’t have repeat value, I think I have only read two books twice, whereas music is listened too many times. With a paper book you can flick quickly between pages to check on something earlier in the book, and if it’s that type of book write notes in the margins etc.

    What are the benefits of an electronic book?
    Mañana
  • apreading
    apreading Posts: 4,535
    ebooks can also write notes 'in the magins' etc
    You can also highlight sections and send them to facebook
    you can also highlight words and ask what they mean
    You can also ask it to read the book for you (but dont - it sounds poor)
    You can also change the font/size - which is really useful for my son who doesnt like books with small print
    You can often get books cheaper & quicker
    You can also play back music if it takes your fancy (although limited features for this)

    YOU CAN GET THE INTERNET AND EMAIL FREE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

    You can get your newspapers delivered to the device everyday - useful if you commute by train so you dont have to wait for paper delivery or buy one at the station every day. Also useful if overseas where papers are a day late and expensive.

    Without the 3G connectivity I am not totally convinced but with it there are several compelling arguements...
  • pb21
    pb21 Posts: 2,170
    The ability to change font size would be useful for some people, as would the newspaper function.

    Other than that my cynical self thinks it’s the epitome of something we don’t need but are led to believe will make our lives better and more fulfilling, much like bottled water!
    Mañana
  • MattC59
    MattC59 Posts: 5,408
    pb21 wrote:
    I don’t really get the point of these?

    I can understand MP3 players, they’re great being able to take your music collection wherever you go. But who has the need to carry more than one or two books around with them? Plus they're not much small than a paper book. Also books generally don’t have repeat value, I think I have only read two books twice, whereas music is listened too many times. With a paper book you can flick quickly between pages to check on something earlier in the book, and if it’s that type of book write notes in the margins etc.

    What are the benefits of an electronic book?

    Travelling. When we go on holiday, my Mrs usually takes 4-5 books with her. This used to be a pain, but not with an e-reader.
    Science adjusts it’s beliefs based on what’s observed.
    Faith is the denial of observation so that Belief can be preserved
  • Scrumple
    Scrumple Posts: 2,665
    Rubbish (see 2 posts up)

    Mine was superb on holiday.

    Read 10 books
    Got BBC football website on, and kept up to date on the champs league results on the refreshing web page - live
    Had the telegraph delivered every day to my ebook
    Mrs used it to check an email and to visit various websites.
    And it doesn't chew battery.

    Say goodbye to a bag full of books.

    And most of this was done on an African beach, for free.
  • cougie
    cougie Posts: 22,512
    I just use the kindle app on my phone. OK so the page is slightly smaller - but I always have my phone with me and its got a backlight. I don't think the kindle has this ?
  • ChrisSA
    ChrisSA Posts: 455
    cougie wrote:
    I just use the kindle app on my phone. OK so the page is slightly smaller - but I always have my phone with me and its got a backlight. I don't think the kindle has this ?

    Neither do books! That is the beauty of the Kindle. It doesn't shine light at you to tire your eyes.
  • I'm undecided about making the transition, one issue I have is digital books have VAT charged on them as they are classed as a luxury item but does this mean as the population gradually transfers to this format we are suddenly paying VAT for something we never used to? Plus with a paper book if I enjoy and want someone else to read it I just hand it over to them...how would this work with a kindle?
  • RDW
    RDW Posts: 1,900
    cougie wrote:
    I just use the kindle app on my phone. OK so the page is slightly smaller - but I always have my phone with me and its got a backlight. I don't think the kindle has this ?

    I was surprised how well a phone works for this - just finished a 900 page book on a basic Android phone with a 3.5" screen.
    ChrisSA wrote:
    That is the beauty of the Kindle. It doesn't shine light at you to tire your eyes.

    On the other hand, you can't read it in the dark! I generally use 'night mode' on the phone (white text on a black backround), which is pretty easy on the eyes.
    I'm undecided about making the transition, one issue I have is digital books have VAT charged on them as they are classed as a luxury item but does this mean as the population gradually transfers to this format we are suddenly paying VAT for something we never used to?

    Yes, it seems this is 'progress'. Plus they seem to charge at least as much as the paperback, though the distribution costs must be much lower.
    Plus with a paper book if I enjoy and want someone else to read it I just hand it over to them...how would this work with a kindle?

    In the US there's some sort of rubbish 14 day lending feature on the Kindle for some of the books, but I don't think we have this in the UK. Amazon basically retains control over how you use a book you've paid for, and sometimes uses this power to remove books:

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/18 ... om_kindle/

    remove features:

    http://boingboing.net/2009/05/14/kindle ... start.html

    or unexpectedly deny you access to a purchase:

    http://www.geardiary.com/2009/06/19/kin ... t-is-ugly/

    You can also only read Kindle books on devices Amazon sells or has an app for, and only for as long as they choose to support them. This is why some naughty, naughty people strip the DRM from every ebook they buy (I hear that someone called 'Apprentice Alf' was once one of these disreputable characters, so you should on no account attempt to Google his evil website).
  • I dont think that removing the DRM from books you buy is naughty, if you've bought a book you should be able to read it with any device or software you want to. Occasionally a book will be cheaper on WHSmith's or Waterstone's websites than on Amazon's, and the only way to read these books on a Kindle is indeed to strip the DRM, that's not naughty, its sensible.

    Its the same as ripping a CD onto your iTunes, without realising it you are removing the DRM from the CD you've just bought and this is under the same Digital media laws as removing DRM from ebooks, and if you tell me you dont rip CDs onto your Ipod then quite frankly I dont believe you.

    What is naughty is then making these publicly available online, but that is a different matter entirely, and of course not one I condone.
  • Keith47
    Keith47 Posts: 158
    As an avid book reader I never thought I would like the Kindle but a chap at work was selling a virtually brand new 3G one for £50 as he hated it, so I bought it thinking if I didn't like it I could sell it on without loss, but I have to say I love it! I've got 7 unread books on it in addition to the 30 or so I've already finished, so no danger of running short of reading matter.
    Also, at work in the canteen when I'm using both hands to devour a breeze block sized sandwich, there's no problem with the pages flipping back over while you're trying to read, a light touch with your little finger turns to the next page, when you turn the device on you go straight to the page you were last reading, being able to adjust font size is a bonus for someone with eyesight as bad as mine, you can take as many books with you as you like (up to 3500 I'm led to believe), and downloading takes about 2 seconds.
    I'd recommend them to anyone :wink:
    The problem is we are not eating food anymore, we are eating food-like products.
  • RDW
    RDW Posts: 1,900
    citrus wrote:
    I dont think that removing the DRM from books you buy is naughty, if you've bought a book you should be able to read it with any device or software you want to.

    Citrus, I hope you're not suggesting that anyone who wants to read the books they've paid for any way they want to, instead of the way Amazon (etc.) dictates, seeks out the website mentioned above? Because then they might read the clear, easy to follow instructions for installing a popular ebook converter and a set of plugins that can seamlessly strip most DRM with a single click, permanently freeing their purchases from external control, and allowing the files to be converted to the format of their choice for reading on nearly any device. Which would be wrong. Very, very wrong.
  • term1te
    term1te Posts: 1,462
    I'm a convert, my wife has the 3G version and it was great on holiday getting the paper delivered before breakfast and being able to check the news, football, etc. for free. I piked up the new wifi version in the US last week, 79USD, bargin. I'd recommend using the Calibre program, if only to collate free news and articles into virtual Kindle books, look it up if you have an E-reader and you haven't found it yet.
  • dabber
    dabber Posts: 1,924
    I'm tempted towards the 3G (keyboard version) as, apart from its book reading function, the free web browsing capability is attractive. I spend about a third of the year in France and it would be very handy to check my gmail account whilst there. I know performance may be a bit slow and the browser capability clunky but if it doesn't cost me anything (above the initial puchase outlay over the wifi version) it could be quite attractive.
    I've asked the question on a French forum and it seems there are others doing this although the 3G coverage is patchy, the 2G performance is usable.
    “You may think that; I couldn’t possibly comment!”

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  • Nuggs
    Nuggs Posts: 1,804
    I read for at least two hours a day during my commute and wouldn't be without my Kindle 3G.

    I have a range of books on it, which would break my back if I tried to carry them around with me. The search, highlight, notes and bookmark functions have all proved more useful than I would have thought possible.

    The fact it doesn't have a backlight is a real bonus as it doesn't cause eye strain. It can also be easily read in direct sunlight.

    I thought I would miss the feel of a book but I really don't. Nor do I miss having stacks of old books dotted around the house that I can't find a home for.

    The Kindle is, without doubt, the best gadget that I own. Love it and wouldn't be without it.
  • RDW wrote:
    Citrus, I hope you're not suggesting that anyone who wants to read the books they've paid for any way they want to, instead of the way Amazon (etc.) dictates, seeks out the website mentioned above? Because then they might read the clear, easy to follow instructions for installing a popular ebook converter and a set of plugins that can seamlessly strip most DRM with a single click, permanently freeing their purchases from external control, and allowing the files to be converted to the format of their choice for reading on nearly any device. Which would be wrong. Very, very wrong.

    Im not saying that explicitly no, because its easy enough for anybody with any basic knowledge of computing to write their own Python scripts to remove DRM themselves. But I am suggesting it is a good idea yes. Owning DRMed books ties you into reading them on a Kindle. What if you want your next ereader to be a Sony one? Is it wrong to read your books on that.

    Could you please answer the question of do you rip CD's onto your iPod? Because that is exactly the same thing.
  • RDW
    RDW Posts: 1,900
    Sorry, I think I'm going to have to start using this:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irony_punctuation
  • ddraver
    ddraver Posts: 26,322
    So would you have a Kindle or a tablet PC/ipad.....? I ask as I like to get magazines but as I'm abroad I can't get them (at anything like a fair price) unless i download pdf's from disreputable sources...(obvioulsy I never...ever....do this with any future publishing material, just mbr ;) )

    THe big problem with that is that moving my desktop into the bog is a bit of a challenge!
    We're in danger of confusing passion with incompetence
    - @ddraver
  • balthazar
    balthazar Posts: 1,565
    ddraver wrote:
    THe big problem with that is that moving my desktop into the bog is a bit of a challenge!

    Could always go the other way:

    Office-Prank-Toilet-Chair.jpg